Warner says there are 'enormous amounts of evidence' suggesting Russia collusion

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerSenate dodges initial December crisis with last-minute deal Liberty University professor charged with alleged sexual battery and abduction of student Five Senate Democrats reportedly opposed to Biden banking nominee MORE (D-Va.) said Sunday that there are "enormous amounts of evidence" suggesting collusion between President TrumpDonald TrumpGOP grapples with chaotic Senate primary in Pennsylvania ​​Trump social media startup receives commitment of billion from unidentified 'diverse group' of investors Iran thinks it has the upper hand in Vienna — here's why it doesn't MORE's 2016 campaign and Russia.

"Where that evidence leads, in terms of a conclusion — and we still have some of those key people to come back — I'm going to reserve judgment until I'm finished," Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, said on NBC's "Meet the Press."

"There's no one that could factually say there's not plenty of evidence of collaboration or communications between Trump Organization and Russians."

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Warner's comments came in response to a quote from Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrTexas Democrat Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson announces retirement at end of term On The Money — IRS chief calls for reinforcements Burr brother-in-law ordered to testify in insider trading probe MORE (R-N.C.) in which he said there was "no factual evidence" of collusion.

Host Chuck Todd pressed Warner on whether there was an actual crime in play that could precipitate the impeachment of Trump.

"I have never in my lifetime seen a presidential campaign, from a person of either party, have this much outreach to a foreign country and a foreign country that the intelligence community, and our committee has validated, intervened, massively, in our election and intervened with an attempt to help one candidate, Donald Trump, and to hurt another candidate, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonRepublican Ohio Senate candidate slams JD Vance over previous Trump comments Budowsky: Why GOP donors flock to Manchin and Sinema Countering the ongoing Republican delusion MORE," he said.

Warner continued that he would reserve his judgement until criminal investigations from special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerAn unquestioning press promotes Rep. Adam Schiff's book based on Russia fiction Senate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG MORE conclude so that the Intelligence Committee can meet with key figures.

"Those criminal investigations need to conclude, before we get a chance to talk to them," he said.

Trump has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing related to collusion, calling investigations into him a "witch hunt."