Warner says there are 'enormous amounts of evidence' suggesting Russia collusion

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerTikTok chief cancels Capitol Hill meetings, inflaming tensions Watchdog report finds FBI not motivated by political bias in Trump probe Ex-Rep. Scott Taylor to seek old Virginia seat MORE (D-Va.) said Sunday that there are "enormous amounts of evidence" suggesting collusion between President TrumpDonald John TrumpSanders urges impeachment trial 'quickly' in the Senate US sending 20,000 troops to Europe for largest exercises since Cold War Barr criticizes FBI, says it's possible agents acted in 'bad faith' in Trump probe MORE's 2016 campaign and Russia.

"Where that evidence leads, in terms of a conclusion — and we still have some of those key people to come back — I'm going to reserve judgment until I'm finished," Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, said on NBC's "Meet the Press."

"There's no one that could factually say there's not plenty of evidence of collaboration or communications between Trump Organization and Russians."

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Warner's comments came in response to a quote from Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrGOP senators request interview with former DNC contractor to probe possible Ukraine ties North Carolina congressman says he won't seek reelection after redistricting Senate passes bipartisan bill to permanently fund historically black colleges MORE (R-N.C.) in which he said there was "no factual evidence" of collusion.

Host Chuck Todd pressed Warner on whether there was an actual crime in play that could precipitate the impeachment of Trump.

"I have never in my lifetime seen a presidential campaign, from a person of either party, have this much outreach to a foreign country and a foreign country that the intelligence community, and our committee has validated, intervened, massively, in our election and intervened with an attempt to help one candidate, Donald Trump, and to hurt another candidate, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDOJ backs ex-Trump campaign aide Rick Gates's probation request The media have fallen out of love with Bernie, but have voters? Trump request for Ukrainian 'favor' tops notable quote list MORE," he said.

Warner continued that he would reserve his judgement until criminal investigations from special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts House impeachment hearings: The witch hunt continues Speier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump MORE conclude so that the Intelligence Committee can meet with key figures.

"Those criminal investigations need to conclude, before we get a chance to talk to them," he said.

Trump has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing related to collusion, calling investigations into him a "witch hunt."