McConnell: Senate will pass resolution blocking Trump's emergency declaration

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump, Dems prep for Mueller report's release McConnell touts Trump support, Supreme Court fights in reelection video Why Ken Cuccinelli should be Trump's choice for DHS MORE (R-Ky.) on Monday said that he expects a resolution blocking President TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse Dems demand Barr cancel 'inappropriate' press conference on Mueller report DOJ plans to release 'lightly redacted' version of Mueller report Thursday: WaPo Nadler accuses Barr of 'unprecedented steps' to 'spin' Mueller report MORE's emergency declaration to pass the Senate, but he does not believe lawmakers will be able to override a veto.  

"I think what is clear in the Senate is that there will be enough votes to pass the resolution of disapproval, which will then be vetoed by the president and then in all likelihood the veto will be upheld in the House," McConnell said while speaking to reporters in Kentucky. 

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The Senate will vote on the resolution before lawmakers leave town on March 15 for a weeklong recess. 

The resolution blocking Trump's emergency declaration appeared to clinch the 51 votes needed to pass the Senate when Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulTrump vetoes measure ending US support for Saudi-led war in Yemen Bottom line Trump: I have not read Mueller report, 'though I have every right to do so' MORE (R-Ky.) announced over the weekend that he would vote for it.  

In addition to Paul, Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Energy: Collins receives more donations from Texas oil, gas industry than from Maine residents | Interior chief left meetings off schedule | Omar controversy jeopardizes Ocasio-Cortez trip to coal mine Embattled senators fill coffers ahead of 2020 Collins receives more donations from Texas fossil fuel industry than from Maine residents MORE (R-Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiCain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed License to discriminate: Religious exemption laws are trampling rights in rural America On The Money — Presented by Job Creators Network — Cain expected to withdraw from Fed consideration, report says | Dem bill directs IRS to create free online filing service | Trump considered Ivanka for World Bank MORE (R-Alaska) and Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisPro-life Christians are demanding pollution protections Embattled senators fill coffers ahead of 2020 Abrams: Schumer has been 'relentless but thoughtful' about Senate bid MORE (R-N.C.) have said they will vote for a resolution of disapproval. Several other GOP senators, including Sens. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerCain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed Embattled senators fill coffers ahead of 2020 Obama-era diplomat launches Colorado Senate bid, would be first openly gay male senator MORE (R-Colo.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioDems say attorney general undermined credibility with Trump talking point Pollster says there is no downside to Dems jumping into 2020 primary Senate confirms Trump's pick for ambassador to Saudi Arabia MORE (R-Fla.) and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyCain says he won't back down, wants to be nominated to Fed The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump, Dems prep for Mueller report's release Democrats need a 'celebrity' candidate — and it's not Biden or Sanders MORE (R-Utah), have yet to say how they will vote. 

Trump announced that he would declare a national emergency to build the U.S.-Mexico border wall after Congress passed a funding bill that included $1.3 billion for physical barriers, below the $5.7 billion the president requested. 

But his decision has put Republicans in a bind. GOP senators have been wary of breaking with the president on border security, but they've also been concerned that Trump's decision could let a future Democratic president use a national emergency declaration on issues like climate change. 

McConnell added that while he was supporting Trump's emergency declaration, he was "hoping he wouldn't take that particular path."

"Yeah I am," he said, asked if he was concerned about the precedent set for a Democratic president. "That's one reason I argued obviously without success to the president that he not take this route."