McConnell: Senate will pass resolution blocking Trump's emergency declaration

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPatient advocates launch drug pricing ad campaign Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — House passes resolution rebuking Trump over Syria | Sparks fly at White House meeting on Syria | Dems say Trump called Pelosi a 'third-rate politician' | Trump, Graham trade jabs War of words at the White House MORE (R-Ky.) on Monday said that he expects a resolution blocking President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP congressman slams Trump over report that U.S. bombed former anti-ISIS coalition headquarters US to restore 'targeted assistance' to Central American countries after migration deal Trump says lawmakers should censure Schiff MORE's emergency declaration to pass the Senate, but he does not believe lawmakers will be able to override a veto.  

"I think what is clear in the Senate is that there will be enough votes to pass the resolution of disapproval, which will then be vetoed by the president and then in all likelihood the veto will be upheld in the House," McConnell said while speaking to reporters in Kentucky. 

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The Senate will vote on the resolution before lawmakers leave town on March 15 for a weeklong recess. 

The resolution blocking Trump's emergency declaration appeared to clinch the 51 votes needed to pass the Senate when Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulCheney unveils Turkey sanctions legislation CNN catches heat for asking candidates about Ellen, Bush friendship at debate Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Trump isolated amid Syria furor | Pompeo, Pence to visit Turkey in push for ceasefire | Turkish troops advance in Syria | Graham throws support behind Trump's sanctions MORE (R-Ky.) announced over the weekend that he would vote for it.  

In addition to Paul, Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGOP warns Graham letter to Pelosi on impeachment could 'backfire' The Hill's Morning Report - Dem debate contenders take aim at Warren Schumer seeks focus on health care amid impeachment fever MORE (R-Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOvernight Energy: Trump administration issues plan to reverse limits on logging in Tongass National Forest| Democrats inch closer to issuing subpoenas for Interior, EPA records| Trump's plan to boost ethanol miffs corn groups and the fossil fuel industry Trump administration issues plan to reverse limits on logging in Tongass National Forest Democrats can lose Trump impeachment battle and still win electoral war MORE (R-Alaska) and Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisTillis says impeachment is 'a waste of resources' GOP requests update on criminal referrals prompted by 2018 Kavanaugh probe The Hill's Campaign Report: Warren, Sanders overtake Biden in third-quarter fundraising MORE (R-N.C.) have said they will vote for a resolution of disapproval. Several other GOP senators, including Sens. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerGOP warns Graham letter to Pelosi on impeachment could 'backfire' The Hill's Morning Report - Dem debate contenders take aim at Warren Schumer seeks focus on health care amid impeachment fever MORE (R-Colo.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioChina's TikTok turns to former lawmakers to help with content moderation policies Hillicon Valley: Warren turns up heat in battle with Facebook | Instagram unveils new data privacy feature | Advocacy group seeks funding to write about Big Tech TikTok adds former lawmakers to help develop content moderation policies MORE (R-Fla.) and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyWar of words at the White House GOP warns Graham letter to Pelosi on impeachment could 'backfire' Club for Growth to run ads in Utah attacking Romney as 'Democrat secret asset' MORE (R-Utah), have yet to say how they will vote. 

Trump announced that he would declare a national emergency to build the U.S.-Mexico border wall after Congress passed a funding bill that included $1.3 billion for physical barriers, below the $5.7 billion the president requested. 

But his decision has put Republicans in a bind. GOP senators have been wary of breaking with the president on border security, but they've also been concerned that Trump's decision could let a future Democratic president use a national emergency declaration on issues like climate change. 

McConnell added that while he was supporting Trump's emergency declaration, he was "hoping he wouldn't take that particular path."

"Yeah I am," he said, asked if he was concerned about the precedent set for a Democratic president. "That's one reason I argued obviously without success to the president that he not take this route."