Senate set to rebuke Trump on support for Saudi Arabia

Senate set to rebuke Trump on support for Saudi Arabia
© Stefani Reynolds
The Senate is set to break with the administration's support for the Saudi-led military campaign in Yemen on Wednesday, likely handing President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump calls for Republicans to be 'united' on abortion Tlaib calls on Amash to join impeachment resolution Facebook temporarily suspended conservative commentator Candace Owens MORE his second setback from Capitol Hill this week. 
 
"The resolution we will vote on in the Senate tomorrow to end U.S. support for the Saudi-led war in Yemen is enormously important and historic. This war is both a humanitarian and a strategic disaster, and Congress has the opportunity to end it," Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersHere are the potential candidates still eyeing 2020 bids Sanders unveils education plan that would ban for-profit charter schools Warren policy ideas show signs of paying off MORE (I-Vt.) said in a statement. 

Three Senate aides told The Hill that they expect a resolution to come to the floor Wednesday that will call on Trump to withdraw any troops in or affecting Yemen within 30 days unless they are fighting al Qaeda.
 
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The resolution would need only a simple majority to pass the Senate, which approved a similar resolution in December. The resolution would need to pass the House before heading to Trump's desk, where he has said he would veto the measure. 
 
With Republicans holding 53 seats in the Senate, Democrats would need to win over at least four Republicans and keep their entire caucus united in order to pass the resolution. The 2018 resolution passed with 56 votes. 
 
Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyConnecticut radio station rebrands itself 'Trump 103.3' Foreign Relations senators demand Iran briefing Prosecutor appointed by Barr poised to enter Washington firestorm MORE (D-Conn.), one of the co-sponsors of the resolution, told The Hill that he expected the vote would be "tight" but predicted that supporters would again be able to pass the resolution. 
 
"It's going to be tight," he said late last week. "But you know nothing has happened to peel Republicans away."
 
The Wednesday vote will come a day before the Senate likely hands a second setback to Trump, with the chamber scheduled to take up a resolution of disapproval on his emergency declaration. If both measures pass Congress it would pave the way for the president to have to use back-to-back veto measures to defeat legislation. 

The House passed its own Yemen resolution last month but it ran into a procedural roadblock in the Senate after the parliamentarian determined that it was not privileged, the status that lets supporters pass the measure with only a majority support in the Senate. 

Supporters have brought up the resolution under the War Powers Act, which gives it a privileged status that allows it to be fast-tracked through Congress and avoid the 60-vote legislative filibuster in the Senate. 

Tensions over Saudi Arabia have been running high on Capitol Hill since last year's slaying of U.S. resident and Washington Post contributor Jamal Khashoggi, which opened up a gap between the administration and lawmakers on the issue. 

Members of the Trump administration briefed the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Monday evening about an investigation, ordered by members of the panel last year, into Khashoggi’s death.

But Republicans on the committee appeared underwhelmed by the meeting, indicating that they didn't learn new information. 

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump: Anonymous news sources are 'bulls---' Trump: 'Good chance' Dems give immigration 'win' after Pelosi called White House plan 'dead on arrival' The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition — Trump: GOP has `clear contrast' with Dems on immigration MORE (R-S.C.), a member of the panel, called the briefing a "waste of time," while Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneySeveral factors have hindered 'next up' presidential candidates in recent years Small Florida county that backed Trump one of two targeted by Russians: reports Foreign Relations senators demand Iran briefing MORE (R-Utah) added that lawmakers "learned very little."
 
—Updated at 5:56 p.m.