GOP Sen. Lamar Alexander to vote against Trump on emergency declaration

GOP Sen. Lamar Alexander to vote against Trump on emergency declaration
© Anna Moneymaker

Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderPelosi aide hopeful White House will support drug-pricing bill despite criticism Overnight Energy: BLM staff face choice of relocation or resignation as agency moves | Trump says he's 'very much into climate' | EPA rule would expand limits on scientific studies Juan Williams: Republicans flee Trump MORE (R-Tenn.) said on Thursday that he would vote for a resolution blocking President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy Official testifies that Bolton had 'one-on-one meeting' with Trump over Ukraine aid Louisiana governor wins re-election MORE’s emergency declaration.

Alexander, asked how he would vote after a floor speech criticizing Trump, said he would vote for the resolution of disapproval that is coming up for a vote later Thursday.

Alexander has voiced concerns for weeks about Trump's actions, but remained tightlipped as recently as earlier Thursday about how he would vote. He reiterated his concerns during a floor speech shortly before he confirmed to reporters that he would vote for the resolution of disapproval.

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"The president's emergency declaration to take an additional $3.6 billion that Congress has appropriated for military hospitals, for basics and for schools … is inconsistent with the United States Constitution that I took an oath to support and defend," Alexander said from the Senate floor.

Alexander is the seventh Republican senator to announce they would vote for the resolution of disapproval, which Trump is pledging to veto.

“This declaration is a dangerous precedent. Already, Democrat presidential candidates are saying they would declare emergencies to tear down the existing border wall, take away guns, stop oil exports, shut down offshore drilling and other left-wing enterprises — all without the approval of Congress," he said.

Alexander, an institutionalist viewed as a member of the GOP governing wing, is retiring at the end of the current Congress, giving him the freedom to vote against Trump without having to worry about political blowback.

He is the second GOP senator to come out in support of blocking Trump's emergency declaration on Tuesday.

In addition to Alexander, GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Defense: Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators | Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract decision in court | Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families Senate confirms controversial circuit court nominee Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families MORE (Maine), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy Hillicon Valley: Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract in court | State antitrust investigation into Google expands | Intel agencies no longer collecting location data without warrant Senators introduce bipartisan bill restricting police use of facial recognition tech MORE (Utah), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiHillicon Valley: Federal inquiry opened into Google health data deal | Facebook reports millions of post takedowns | Microsoft shakes up privacy debate | Disney plus tops 10M sign-ups in first day Senators press FDA tobacco chief on status of vaping ban Federal inquiry opened into Google health data deal MORE (Alaska), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy Trump: 'Everybody knows who the whistleblower is' Johnson opens door to subpoenaing whistleblower, Schiff, Bidens MORE (Ky.), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyDeval Patrick: a short runway, but potential to get airborne Ocasio-Cortez jabs 'plutocratic' late entrants to 2020 field Jon Huntsman expected to run for governor in Utah MORE (Utah) and Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisThis week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry Progressive veterans group launches campaign labeling Trump as a 'national security threat' Trump rules out total rollback of Chinese tariffs MORE (N.C.) have said they will support the resolution of disapproval.

The Senate is expected to pass the resolution of disapproval later Thursday, sparking the first veto showdown with Trump, who is adamantly opposed to the resolution.

Trump made a series of eleventh-hour pleas to Republicans to vote against the resolution of disapproval, ranging from being open to amending emergency powers in the future to warning they were siding with Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiLouisiana governor wins re-election Dynamic scoring: Forward-thinking budgeting practices to grow our economy Pelosi: Trump tweets on Yovanovitch show his 'insecurity as an imposter' MORE (D-Calif.).

"Prominent legal scholars agree that our actions to address the National Emergency at the Southern Border and to protect the American people are both CONSTITUTIONAL and EXPRESSLY authorized by Congress," Trump said in a tweet Thursday morning.

He pivoted in a subsequent post, adding: "A vote for today’s resolution by Republican Senators is a vote for Nancy Pelosi, Crime, and the Open Border Democrats!"