12 Republican senators defy Trump on emergency declaration 

Twelve Senate Republicans from different corners of the party banded together Thursday to deliver President TrumpDonald John TrumpGiuliani says he is unaware of reported federal investigation Louisiana's Democratic governor forced into runoff Lawmakers focus their ire on NBA, not China MORE the biggest rebuke of his presidency, voting to disapprove of his emergency declaration for the Southern border.

The Republican rebels joined every single Senate Democrat in the chamber in voting to block Trump’s emergency declaration, which grants him access to $3.6 billion in military construction funding to build border barriers. 

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The vote brought together prominent moderates — Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsMcConnell tightlipped as impeachment furor grows Congress set for showdown with Trump over Kurds Trump seeks to distance himself from Turkish invasion of Syria MORE (R-Maine) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiMurkowski warns against rushing to conclusions on Trump impeachment GOP requests update on criminal referrals prompted by 2018 Kavanaugh probe Republicans show signs of discomfort in defense of Trump   MORE (R-Alaska) — and staunch conservatives — Sens. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSunday Show Preview: Trump's allies and administration defend decision on Syria Ana Navarro clashes with Rand Paul in fiery exchange: 'Don't mansplain!' Trump's Syria blunder is escapism not strategy MORE (R-Ky.) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeGOP requests update on criminal referrals prompted by 2018 Kavanaugh probe McConnell warns Trump against withdrawing troops from Syria The American people deserve a debate about Ukrainian military aid MORE (R-Utah) — as well as other Republicans who fall between them on the ideological spectrum. 

The resolution also won the support of three of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMattis warns 'ISIS will resurge' without U.S. pressure on Syria McConnell tightlipped as impeachment furor grows Hillicon Valley: Google, Reddit to testify on tech industry protections | Trump joins Amazon-owned Twitch | House to vote on bill to combat foreign interference MORE’s (R-Ky.) most trusted advisers on policy issues: Sens. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGOP senator: 'Not appropriate' to ask foreign governments to investigate Biden GOP senator says he doesn't remember signing 2016 letter urging 'reform' of Ukraine prosecutor's office Lobbying World MORE (R-Ohio) and Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyNSA improperly collected US phone records in October, new documents show Overnight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general WH backpedals on Trump's 'due process' remark on guns MORE (R-Pa.), members of the Finance Committee who are considered experts on trade and tax policy, and Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderMcConnell tightlipped as impeachment furor grows GOP senator: 'Inappropriate' to discuss opponents, but impeachment a 'mistake' The revolution has arrived in college admissions MORE (R-Tenn.), an authority on a range of topics.

It also won the last-minute support of Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntSenators take fundraising efforts to Nats playoff games Senate Intelligence report triggers new calls for action on election security Sunday shows - Second whistleblower grabs spotlight MORE (R-Mo.), the chairman of the Senate Republican Policy Committee and a member of McConnell’s elected leadership team. 

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyMcConnell tightlipped as impeachment furor grows The Memo: Bad polls for Trump shake GOP Romney brushes off Trump criticism: 'I don't follow the president on Twitter' MORE (R-Utah), who has emerged as a counterweight to Trump in the Senate’s freshman class, announced his support for the resolution Thursday morning, declaring, “This is a vote for the Constitution and for the balance of powers that is at its core.”

His home-state colleague, Lee, who tried to assemble a last-minute deal with the White House to rein in the president’s powers under the National Emergencies Act, said, “The White House is asserting authority to spend money objects and priorities in a manner not themselves directly authorized by Congress.”

“Congress directly refused the request to appropriate the specific amount of funds that we’ere dealing with here,” he added. 

The backlash against Trump was all the more pointed after days of lobbying led by Vice President Pence, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenTrump says acting Homeland Security chief McAleenan will step down Activists to demonstrate at ICE headquarters after Cameroonian immigrant dies in custody Ex-Citizenship and Immigration Services chief returns to DHS in different role MORE and White House legislative liaison Shahira Knight.

Trump himself made a final appeal to Republican senators on Thursday, tweeting about drug smuggling and human trafficking at the border and asserting the constitutionality of his action. 

“A vote for today’s resolution by Republican Senators is a vote for Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiWhy calls for impeachment have become commonplace The Constitution doesn't require a vote to start the impeachment process Louisiana voters head to the polls in governor's race as Trump urges GOP support MORE, Crime, and the Open Border Democrats!” he warned. 

But in a telling reflection of Trump’s popularity with the Republican base, only one of the 12 rebels is up for reelection next year: Collins, who represents a state that Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonRonan Farrow exposes how the media protect the powerful Kamala Harris to Trump Jr.: 'You wouldn't know a joke if one raised you' Comey says he has a 'fantasy' about deleting his Twitter account after end of Trump term MORE won in 2016. 

Another Republican facing reelection, Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisTillis says impeachment is 'a waste of resources' GOP requests update on criminal referrals prompted by 2018 Kavanaugh probe The Hill's Campaign Report: Warren, Sanders overtake Biden in third-quarter fundraising MORE (R-N.C.), changed his position on the disapproval resolution moments before the vote. 

Tillis stated his support for the resolution in a Feb. 25 op-ed in The Washington Post but since then has come under pressure from conservatives in North Carolina, who warn he may face a primary challenge in 2020. 

Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseSenators take fundraising efforts to Nats playoff games On The Money: Fed officials saw rising risk of recession | Ocasio-Cortez, Cruz blast NBA for 'outrageous' response to China | Prospects dim for trade breakthrough with China Ocasio-Cortez, Ted Cruz join colleagues blasting NBA for 'outrageous' response to China MORE (R-Neb.), who describes himself as a “constitutional conservative” and warned in February that Trump’s declaration could undermine constitutional checks and balances, also voted "no." 

Sasse was seen as a possible "yes" vote, but he too is on the ballot in 2020 and could face a primary challenger on the basis of his up-and-down relationship with Trump.  

Some Republicans, such as Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioFive ways Trump's Syria decision spells trouble Rubio hits Warren's 'crude' and 'vulgar' response to opposition to same-sex marriage Trump puts election-year politics at center of impeachment case MORE (Fla.), had made up their minds days ago but kept their decisions private out of deference to the White House and GOP colleagues who were trying to come up with a compromise to avoid voting for the disapproval resolution. 

Rubio, however, a member of the Senate Appropriations subcommittee on military construction, made clear last month that he had serious misgivings about diverting funds Congress had appropriated to rebuild and maintain military installations. 

Some Republicans who voted against the resolution flew under the radar in the days leading up to the vote. 

Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranMcConnell signaling Trump trial to be quick, if it happens Overnight Defense — Presented by Huntington Ingalls Industries — Furor over White House readout of Ukraine call | Dems seize on memo in impeachment push | Senate votes to end Trump emergency | Congress gets briefing on Iran Senate again votes to end Trump emergency declaration on border wall MORE (R-Kan.), who kept his position private and didn’t participate prominently in the frantic negotiations of the past week to come up with a way to defeat the disapproval resolution, announced his "yes" vote on Thursday morning. 

“I share President Trump’s goal of securing our borders, but expanding the powers of the presidency beyond its constitutional limits is something I cannot support,” he tweeted.

Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerHillicon Valley: Trump official declines to testify on trade protections for tech | Senators call for better info-sharing on supply chain threats | Apple pulls app after Chinese pressure Key Democrat presses FTC over Facebook settlement's 'dangerous precedent' Cyber rules for self-driving cars stall in Congress MORE (R-Miss.), the chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, also kept his position quiet until voting for the resolution on the floor. 

After years of watching power in Washington slowly shift from Congress to the White House, a trend accelerated by the gridlock that has characterized Capitol Hill over much of the last decade, Republican senators on Thursday said they hah had enough. 

In the end, the vote boiled down to an effort by GOP lawmakers to preserve their power of the purse, even though they agree with Trump’s desire to secure the border to halt the flow of drugs and illegal immigrants. 

“One branch of government is asking another branch to give up power. Nobody gives up power around here. People want power, they don’t want to give it up,” said Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.), explaining why it was perhaps inevitable that Republican colleagues would rebel against Trump’s emergency declaration. 

Thursday’s vote was the second time in two days the Senate voted to limit Trump’s power.

Senators voted Wednesday 54-46 to withdraw U.S. military support for a Saudi-backed coalition fighting in Yemen’s civil war. Seven Republicans voted for that measure even though it faces a veto.

Here is the list of the GOP senators who voted against Trump on the emergency declaration:

Sen. Lamar Alexander (Tenn.)

Sen. Roy Blunt (Mo.)

Sen. Susan Collins (Maine)

Sen. Mike Lee (Utah) 

Sen. Jerry Moran (Kan.)

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska)

Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.)

Sen. Rob Portman (Ohio)

Sen. Mitt Romney (Utah)

Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.)

Sen. Pat Toomey (Pa.)

Sen. Roger Wicker (Miss.)

--Updated at 3:30 p.m.