12 Republican senators defy Trump on emergency declaration 

Twelve Senate Republicans from different corners of the party banded together Thursday to deliver President TrumpDonald John TrumpMark Kelly clinches Democratic Senate nod in Arizona Trump camp considering White House South Lawn for convention speech: reports Longtime Rep. Lacy Clay defeated in Missouri Democratic primary MORE the biggest rebuke of his presidency, voting to disapprove of his emergency declaration for the Southern border.

The Republican rebels joined every single Senate Democrat in the chamber in voting to block Trump’s emergency declaration, which grants him access to $3.6 billion in military construction funding to build border barriers. 

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The vote brought together prominent moderates — Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsUnemployment debate sparks GOP divisions Obama announces first wave of 2020 endorsements Senate GOP divided over whether they'd fill Supreme Court vacancy  MORE (R-Maine) and Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenators holding behind-the-scenes talks on breaking coronavirus package stalemate Senate votes to confirm Energy's No. 2 official 300 green groups say Senate has 'moral duty' to reject Trump's public lands nominee MORE (R-Alaska) — and staunch conservatives — Sens. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulMultiple lawmakers self-quarantine after exposure to Gohmert Gohmert tests positive for COVID-19 Republican senators revolt over coronavirus proposal MORE (R-Ky.) and Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeTrump signs major conservation bill into law Tea Party rises up against McConnell's trillion relief plan Hillicon Valley: Twitter bans thousands of QAnon accounts | Bipartisan support grows for election funds in Senate stimulus bill | Senate committee advances bill to ban TikTok from federal devices MORE (R-Utah) — as well as other Republicans who fall between them on the ideological spectrum. 

The resolution also won the support of three of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump's election delay red herring On The Money: Unemployment debate sparks GOP divisions | Pandemic reveals flaws of unemployment insurance programs | Survey finds nearly one-third of rehired workers laid off again OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump signs major conservation bill into law | Senate votes to confirm Energy's No. 2 official | Trump Jr. expresses opposition to Pebble Mine project MORE’s (R-Ky.) most trusted advisers on policy issues: Sens. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSenators holding behind-the-scenes talks on breaking coronavirus package stalemate Overnight Defense: Pompeo pressed on move to pull troops from Germany | Panel abruptly scraps confirmation hearing | Trump meets family of slain soldier Pompeo, lawmakers tangle over Germany troop withdrawal MORE (R-Ohio) and Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyDunford withdraws from consideration to chair coronavirus oversight panel GOP senators push for quick, partial reopening of economy NSA improperly collected US phone records in October, new documents show MORE (R-Pa.), members of the Finance Committee who are considered experts on trade and tax policy, and Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderNegotiators hit gas on coronavirus talks as frustration mounts Chamber of Commerce endorses Ernst for reelection Pelosi huddles with chairmen on surprise billing but deal elusive MORE (R-Tenn.), an authority on a range of topics.

It also won the last-minute support of Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntGOP expects Senate to be in session next week without coronavirus deal House Republicans introduce legislation to give states 0 million for elections Frustration builds as negotiators struggle to reach COVID-19 deal MORE (R-Mo.), the chairman of the Senate Republican Policy Committee and a member of McConnell’s elected leadership team. 

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyNRCC poll finds McBath ahead of Handel in Georgia Unemployment debate sparks GOP divisions Senate GOP divided over whether they'd fill Supreme Court vacancy  MORE (R-Utah), who has emerged as a counterweight to Trump in the Senate’s freshman class, announced his support for the resolution Thursday morning, declaring, “This is a vote for the Constitution and for the balance of powers that is at its core.”

His home-state colleague, Lee, who tried to assemble a last-minute deal with the White House to rein in the president’s powers under the National Emergencies Act, said, “The White House is asserting authority to spend money objects and priorities in a manner not themselves directly authorized by Congress.”

“Congress directly refused the request to appropriate the specific amount of funds that we’ere dealing with here,” he added. 

The backlash against Trump was all the more pointed after days of lobbying led by Vice President Pence, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenTrump's acting ICE chief to leave post Trump's fight with city leaders escalates Neo-Nazi pleads guilty to 'swatting' Black church, Cabinet official, journalists MORE and White House legislative liaison Shahira Knight.

Trump himself made a final appeal to Republican senators on Thursday, tweeting about drug smuggling and human trafficking at the border and asserting the constitutionality of his action. 

“A vote for today’s resolution by Republican Senators is a vote for Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiNegotiators hit gas on coronavirus talks as frustration mounts Hillicon Valley: NSA warns of new security threats | Teen accused of Twitter hack pleads not guilty | Experts warn of mail-in voting misinformation Schiff, Khanna call for free masks for all Americans in coronavirus aid package MORE, Crime, and the Open Border Democrats!” he warned. 

But in a telling reflection of Trump’s popularity with the Republican base, only one of the 12 rebels is up for reelection next year: Collins, who represents a state that Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Hill's Campaign Report: Even the Post Office is political now | Primary action tonight | Super PACS at war Should Biden consider a veteran for vice president? Biden leads Trump by nearly 40 points in California: poll MORE won in 2016. 

Another Republican facing reelection, Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisObama announces first wave of 2020 endorsements On The Trail: The first signs of a post-Trump GOP Chamber of Commerce endorses Ernst for reelection MORE (R-N.C.), changed his position on the disapproval resolution moments before the vote. 

Tillis stated his support for the resolution in a Feb. 25 op-ed in The Washington Post but since then has come under pressure from conservatives in North Carolina, who warn he may face a primary challenge in 2020. 

Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseOn The Trail: The first signs of a post-Trump GOP McConnell: 15-20 GOP senators will not vote for any coronavirus deal CNN chyron says 'nah' to Trump claim about Russia MORE (R-Neb.), who describes himself as a “constitutional conservative” and warned in February that Trump’s declaration could undermine constitutional checks and balances, also voted "no." 

Sasse was seen as a possible "yes" vote, but he too is on the ballot in 2020 and could face a primary challenger on the basis of his up-and-down relationship with Trump.  

Some Republicans, such as Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSenate Intel panel approves final Russia report, moves toward public release Negotiators hit gas on coronavirus talks as frustration mounts Mnuchin: Negotiators no closer to coronavirus deal than a week ago MORE (Fla.), had made up their minds days ago but kept their decisions private out of deference to the White House and GOP colleagues who were trying to come up with a compromise to avoid voting for the disapproval resolution. 

Rubio, however, a member of the Senate Appropriations subcommittee on military construction, made clear last month that he had serious misgivings about diverting funds Congress had appropriated to rebuild and maintain military installations. 

Some Republicans who voted against the resolution flew under the radar in the days leading up to the vote. 

Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranTrump tests GOP loyalty with election tweet and stimulus strategy VOA visa decision could hobble Venezuela coverage As ADA anniversary nears, lawmakers express concern about changes to captioned telephone service MORE (R-Kan.), who kept his position private and didn’t participate prominently in the frantic negotiations of the past week to come up with a way to defeat the disapproval resolution, announced his "yes" vote on Thursday morning. 

“I share President Trump’s goal of securing our borders, but expanding the powers of the presidency beyond its constitutional limits is something I cannot support,” he tweeted.

Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: INOVIO R&D Chief Kate Broderick 'completely confident' world will develop a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine; GOP boxed in on virus negotiations Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers zero in on Twitter after massive hack | US, UK, Canada allege Russian hackers targeted COVID-19 vaccine researchers | Top EU court rules data transfer deal with the US is illegal Lawmakers zero in on Twitter following massive hack MORE (R-Miss.), the chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, also kept his position quiet until voting for the resolution on the floor. 

After years of watching power in Washington slowly shift from Congress to the White House, a trend accelerated by the gridlock that has characterized Capitol Hill over much of the last decade, Republican senators on Thursday said they hah had enough. 

In the end, the vote boiled down to an effort by GOP lawmakers to preserve their power of the purse, even though they agree with Trump’s desire to secure the border to halt the flow of drugs and illegal immigrants. 

“One branch of government is asking another branch to give up power. Nobody gives up power around here. People want power, they don’t want to give it up,” said Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.), explaining why it was perhaps inevitable that Republican colleagues would rebel against Trump’s emergency declaration. 

Thursday’s vote was the second time in two days the Senate voted to limit Trump’s power.

Senators voted Wednesday 54-46 to withdraw U.S. military support for a Saudi-backed coalition fighting in Yemen’s civil war. Seven Republicans voted for that measure even though it faces a veto.

Here is the list of the GOP senators who voted against Trump on the emergency declaration:

Sen. Lamar Alexander (Tenn.)

Sen. Roy Blunt (Mo.)

Sen. Susan Collins (Maine)

Sen. Mike Lee (Utah) 

Sen. Jerry Moran (Kan.)

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska)

Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.)

Sen. Rob Portman (Ohio)

Sen. Mitt Romney (Utah)

Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.)

Sen. Pat Toomey (Pa.)

Sen. Roger Wicker (Miss.)

--Updated at 3:30 p.m.