Trump's attacks on McCain exacerbate tensions with Senate GOP

President TrumpDonald John TrumpDC board rejects Trump Hotel effort to dismiss complaint seeking removal of liquor license on basis of Trump's 'character' DC board rejects Trump Hotel effort to dismiss complaint seeking removal of liquor license on basis of Trump's 'character' Mexico's immigration chief resigns amid US pressure over migrants MORE’s disparaging attack on the late Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCain#JohnMcCainDay trends on Trump's 73rd birthday #JohnMcCainDay trends on Trump's 73rd birthday New poll finds little GOP support for spending cuts to specific federal programs MORE (R-Ariz.) is upsetting Senate Republicans who see the repeated insults on a war hero and former pillar of the Senate as unnecessary and corrosive. 

Trump has lashed out at McCain four times in the last five days, most recently at an event in Ohio on Wednesday where he spent a full five minutes on the senator — at one point even evoking the McCain's state funeral.

“I gave him the kind of funeral that he wanted, which as president I had to approve,” Trump told workers, who went silent during the remarks, at a tank factory in Lima. “I don’t care about this, I didn't get a thank you. That's OK.”

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Several Republican senators have spoken out against the president’s remarks, which come days after the Senate rebuked the president by overturning his emergency declaration to build a wall on the Mexican border.

That vote, which led to Trump’s first veto as president, underscored the brewing tensions between Trump and GOP senators, which are being exacerbated by the president’s insults of McCain.

The strongest pushback against Trump’s putdowns of McCain came Wednesday when Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonSenate passes disaster aid bill after deal with Trump GOP senators work to get Trump on board with new disaster aid package Senators say they've reached deal on Puerto Rico aid MORE (R-Ga.), usually a soft-spoken senator, chastised Trump for his behavior.

Isakson, the chairman of the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee, urged the president to show more respect to combat veterans such as McCain. 

“It’s deplorable what he said,” Isakson said in a radio interview with Bill Nigut of “Political Rewind.” 

“It will be deplorable seven months from now if he says it again,” he added.

“We don’t talk about our veterans in any way but to brag on them for the service they render."

Isakson said he hopes other Senate GOP colleagues will also speak out. 

“I hope my other members will say what they think when they think it’s appropriate and the way they think it’s appropriate to do so,” he said. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Defense: Trump doubles down on claim Iran attacked tankers | Iran calls accusations 'alarming' | Top nuke official quietly left Pentagon | Pelosi vows Congress will block Saudi arms sale Overnight Defense: Trump doubles down on claim Iran attacked tankers | Iran calls accusations 'alarming' | Top nuke official quietly left Pentagon | Pelosi vows Congress will block Saudi arms sale McConnell defends Trump amid backlash: 'He gets picked at every day' MORE (R-Ky.) joined Isakson in defending McCain but stopped short of criticizing Trump directly. 

“Today and every day I miss my good friend John McCain. It was a blessing to serve alongside a rare patriot and genuine American hero in the Senate,” McConnell wrote in a Wednesday tweet that served to provide Isakson with some political cover.

“His memory continues to remind me every day that our nation is sustained by the sacrifice of heroes,” he said. 

Isakson noted Wednesday that he and McConnell had dinner on Tuesday night at an Atlanta restaurant, although he says he didn’t discuss with the leader his plans to call out Trump.

Former Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeDemocrats needle GOP on standing up to Trump Democrats needle GOP on standing up to Trump Amash gets standing ovation at first town hall after calling for Trump's impeachment MORE (R-Ariz.), McCain’s home-state colleague for nearly six years, said Isakson’s comments reflect broader concern within the Senate GOP conference over Trump’s behavior. 

“Johnny is a decent man. Any decent politician or decent person is offended by this kind of talk, especially six months after John McCain’s death,” Flake told The Hill. 

“Johnny is very soft-spoken so it must have just hit the tipping point. The fact that Johnny is speaking up lets you know how far the president has gone,” he added. 

Flake predicted other Senate Republicans will echo Isakson’s concerns.

But it’s far from clear if that will be the case.

Many Republicans have been reluctant to speak out against the president for fear of sparking a primary challenge. Isakson is not up for reelection until 2022.

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamMcConnell defends Trump amid backlash: 'He gets picked at every day' McConnell defends Trump amid backlash: 'He gets picked at every day' The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by MAPRx — Biden, Sanders to share stage at first DNC debate MORE (R-S.C.), McCain’s best friend in the Senate, did not call out Trump over his disparaging remarks about McCain over the weekend, though he defended his friend. Graham is up for reelection in 2020.

“He stepped forward to risk his life for his country, served honorably under difficult circumstances, and was one of the most consequential senators in the history of the body. Nothing about his service will ever be changed or diminished,” Graham tweeted Sunday. 

He did later call Trump’s criticism of McCain “a huge mistake.” 

Most of the criticism of Trump has come from people like Flake who are former GOP senators — though their remarks, like Isakson’s, are said to reflect the feelings of other senators.

Former Sen. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.), who served 18 years in the Senate with McCain and was an adviser to McConnell’s leadership team, said “it’s almost an attack on Sen. McCain and his incredible record of service to the United States but it’s an attack on the Senate and I think that’s the way most senators probably view it.”

He questioned whether the tensions could lead to problems for Trump with the Senate, however.

“I don’t know where it goes. His relationships with the Congress are so weak now that I don’t think he can hurt it anymore,” he said.

Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerUS women's soccer team reignites equal pay push Blue Dogs look to move forward on infrastructure project Democratic strategist says Republicans are turning immigration debate into 'political football' MORE (N.Y.) on Wednesday tried to take advantage of the rift among Republicans by announcing that he will reintroduce legislation to rename the Russell Senate office building, a memoriam to the late Sen. Richard Russell Jr. (D-Ga.), a longtime opponent of civil rights legislation, after McCain instead.  

Isakson, however, dismissed the effort as “playing politics” and said he would wait for recommendations from a committee, including members of McCain’s family, on how to best honor his former colleague. 

Trump lashed out at McCain over the weekend after court documents confirmed that McCain shared a dossier of compromising allegations about Trump immediately after the 2016 presidential election to then-FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyUnder Trump, our democracy is for sale Sarah Sanders to leave White House Sarah Sanders to leave White House MORE, whom Trump later fired. 

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyMcConnell defends Trump amid backlash: 'He gets picked at every day' McConnell defends Trump amid backlash: 'He gets picked at every day' 'Landslide' for Biden? A look at 40 years of inaccurate presidential polls MORE (R-Utah), who lost the Republican presidential nomination to McCain in 2008, called out Trump’s attacks on Tuesday. 

“I can’t understand why the President would, once again, disparage a man as exemplary as my friend John McCain: heroic, courageous, patriotic, honorable, self-effacing, self-sacrificing, empathetic, and driven by duty to family, country, and God,” Romney tweeted on Tuesday. 

Other Republicans have shied away from challenging Trump, notably Sen. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyDemocratic challenger to Susan Collins announces Senate bid Democratic challenger to Susan Collins announces Senate bid Democrats hope some presidential candidates drop out — and run for Senate  MORE (R-Ariz.), who was appointed to fill McCain’s vacant seat in December and faces a tough reelection next year. 

McSally praised McCain Wednesday as “an American hero,” tweeting “everyone should give him and his family the respect, admiration, and peace they deserve.”

That response, however, drew criticism from EJ Montini, an opinion columnist for The Arizona Republic, who said it didn’t go far enough. 

“She’s afraid. She has an election coming up in 2020, and she’s afraid that if she speaks honestly about Trump, he’ll turn on her,” he wrote.