Graham hints at further questioning of Comey in wake of Mueller findings

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump: 'I wouldn't mind' a long Senate impeachment process Poll finds Graham with just 2-point lead on Democratic challenger Hill editor-in-chief calls IG report 'a game-changer' MORE (R-S.C.) hinted at further questioning of ex-FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by UANI — Judiciary Democrats approve articles of impeachment setting up House vote next week Huckabee teases Hannity appearance, says he'll explain why Trump is eligible for third term Five takeaways on Horowitz's testimony on Capitol Hill MORE on Sunday after the attorney general released a summary of the key findings from special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerJeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay Trump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts MORE's investigation.

"Could not agree more. See you soon," Graham tweeted, sharing a tweet from Comey earlier in the day.  

Comey had tweeted "so many questions" with an image of him in the forest after Attorney General William Barr sent a letter to Congress detailing the conclusions of Mueller's investigation into potential collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

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The letter said that Mueller did not find evidence that the Trump campaign conspired or coordinated with Russia to interfere in the 2016 presidential election.

The letter also said that Mueller and his team had not concluded one way or another whether Trump obstructed justice while president. But Barr added that he and Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinRosenstein, Sessions discussed firing Comey in late 2016 or early 2017: FBI notes Justice Dept releases another round of summaries from Mueller probe Judge rules former WH counsel McGahn must testify under subpoena MORE had decided not to pursue an obstruction charge after reviewing the special counsel's findings.

When asked for clarification on Graham's tweet, his office pointed The Hill to a letter from Graham to Barr about investigating a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrant obtained on Carter Page, a former foreign policy adviser on Trump's campaign.

Republicans have said the FISA warrant obtained on Page was an abuse of federal power and based on faulty evidence.

Among the evidence presented by the Justice Department for the warrant was a controversial dossier compiled in 2016 by former British intelligence agent Christopher Steele.

That dossier alleges ties between the Trump campaign and Russia, but has not been verified.

In applying for the surveillance warrant on Page, the Justice Department had failed to disclose to the court that the research had been paid for, in part, by Democrats.

The concerns over the FISA warrant are part of a larger effort by Republicans to argue that the Justice Department made partisan decisions during the 2016 election, potentially to influence it.

Sunday's conclusion that there was no collusion between Trump's campaign and Russia may reignite efforts from Graham and other Republicans to pursue investigations into that issue.

Comey testified in front of House Republicans in late 2018 and has met with several members of the Senate Judiciary Committee on issues relating to Russia.