Rand Paul: 'Time for Congress to investigate' Obama

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulMellman: Looking to Iowa Pelosi gets standing ovation at Kennedy Center Honors Senate braces for brawl on Trump impeachment rules MORE (R-Ky.) said Wednesday that lawmakers should investigate former President Obama, suggesting that he could have played a role in the years-long Russia investigation that concluded over the weekend.

In a tweet, the senator suggested that Congress should probe the origins of the now-concluded special counsel investigation into Russian election interference and possible ties with the Trump campaign, seemingly suggesting that Obama was involved in the FBI probe that predated it.

"I agree with @kimguilfoyle Time for Congress to investigate. What did President Obama know and when? How did this hoax go on for so long unabated?" Paul asked.

Obama reportedly was informed by the FBI in 2016 that the bureau was investigating Russian attempts to interfere in the 2016 election, but, according to former Vice President Biden's telling, Obama was warned against going public with the investigation by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellRepublicans consider skipping witnesses in Trump impeachment trial On The Money: Pelosi, Trump tout deal on new NAFTA | McConnell says no trade vote until impeachment trial wraps up | Lawmakers push spending deadline to Thursday McConnell: Senate impeachment trial will begin in January MORE (R-Ky.).

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Obama, during his tenure, said he confronted Russian President Vladimir Putin about Russian interference in the 2016 election. The former president, according to The New York Times, said he told Putin “to cut it out, there were going to be serious consequences if he did not.”

The FBI's probe of the campaign began following comments former Trump campaign adviser George PapadopoulosGeorge Demetrios PapadopoulosTrump can't cry foul on FISA – unless he's suddenly a civil libertarian Misfired 'Hurricane': Comey's team abused Carter Page and the FBI Former FBI general counsel wants apology from Trump MORE reportedly made to Australian diplomats about Russia's theft of emails from the Democratic National Committee in May 2016.

The New York Times reported in 2018 that Papadopoulos's comments led to the FBI’s counterintelligence investigation into Russian interference, which evolved into the special counsel probe after President TrumpDonald John TrumpRepublicans consider skipping witnesses in Trump impeachment trial Bombshell Afghanistan report bolsters calls for end to 'forever wars' Lawmakers dismiss Chinese retaliatory threat to US tech MORE fired former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyMisfired 'Hurricane': Comey's team abused Carter Page and the FBI Trump rebukes FBI chief Wray over inspector general's Russia inquiry The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - Democrats to release articles of impeachment today MORE in 2017.

Trump and his allies have repeatedly attacked the Mueller investigation as a partisan effort to undermine his presidency.