SPONSORED:

Dem introducing constitutional amendment to abolish Electoral College

Sen. Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzDemocrats blast Biden climate adviser over infrastructure remarks Parliamentarian changes Senate calculus for Biden agenda Senate climate advocates start digging in on infrastructure goals MORE (D-Hawaii) is set this week to introduce a constitutional amendment to abolish the Electoral College, The Daily Beast first reported Monday.

An aide told the outlet that the amendment is supported by Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandCosmetic chemicals need a makeover Overnight Defense: Austin and Milley talk budget, Afghanistan, sexual assault and more at wide-ranging Senate hearing Top general: Military justice overhaul proposed by Gillibrand 'requires some detailed study' MORE (D-N.Y.), Dick DurbinDick DurbinHarris calls for pathway to citizenship for Dreamers on DACA anniversary The Hill's Morning Report - Biden on Putin: 'a worthy adversary' McConnell sparks new Supreme Court fight MORE (D-Ill.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinYouth climate activists march outside California homes of Pelosi and Feinstein Cosmetic chemicals need a makeover Progressives want to tighten screws beyond Manchin and Sinema MORE (D-Calif.). Multiple news outlets confirmed Schatz's plan.

The Hawaii lawmaker's office did not immediately respond to The Hill's request for comment on the reports.

ADVERTISEMENT

The proposal comes on the heels of a package of election reform bills introduced last week by Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyOvernight Energy: Schumer to trigger reconciliation process Wednesday | Bipartisan bill would ban 'forever chemicals' in cosmetics | Biden admin eyes step toward Trump-era proposal for uranium reserve Progressives threaten to block bipartisan infrastructure proposal Youth climate activists march outside California homes of Pelosi and Feinstein MORE (D-Ore.).

These efforts are not currently merged together, according to the Daily Beast.

One of Merkley's bills would propose a constitutional amendment to nix the Electoral College and elect the president by a direct popular vote. 

Abolishing the Electoral College has gained popularity in progressive circles recently.

Several 2020 White House hopefuls, like Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenProgressives rave over Harrison's start at DNC On The Money: Schumer to trigger reconciliation process on Wednesday | Four states emerge as test case for cutting off jobless benefits Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC MORE (D-Mass.), Cory BookerCory BookerZombie Tax punishes farmers to fill DC coffers Rand Paul does not support a national minimum wage increase — and it's important to understand why Absences force Senate to punt vote on Biden nominee MORE (D-N.J.) and Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisDemocrats learn hard truths about Capitol breach Harris calls for pathway to citizenship for Dreamers on DACA anniversary Abbott says he'll solicit public donations for border wall MORE (D-Calif.), have expressed openness to the reform.

Booker said last week during a CNN town hall that he believes that the person who wins the most votes should be the president, but added that "we have to win the next election under the rules that are there now."

Harris separately said she was "open" to the idea, while Warren urged supporters to sign a petition supporting "getting rid of the Electoral College."

Any amendment would face a tough road: It would first need to win over two-thirds of both chambers of Congress and then be ratified by three-fourths of the states.