Warren, Booker reintroduce Dignity for Incarcerated Women Act

Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenPoll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Overnight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia Warren-backed amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to defense bill MORE (D-Mass.) and Cory BookerCory BookerJD Vance takes aim at culture wars, childless politicians Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Democrats criticize FBI's handling of tip line in Kavanaugh investigation MORE (D-N.J.) on Tuesday reintroduced the Dignity for Incarcerated Women Act. 

The bill, introduced with Reps. Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalSchumer feels pressure from all sides on spending strategy Liberal House Democrats urge Schumer to stick to infrastructure ultimatum Democrats ramp up spending sales pitch MORE (D-Wash.) and Karen BassKaren Ruth BassBiden: Republicans who say Democrats want to defund the police are lying Omar leads lawmakers in calling for US envoy to combat Islamophobia Democrats face daunting hurdles despite promising start MORE (D-Calif.), aims to reform the way women are treated behind bars.  

The legislation would make it easier for incarcerated women to stay in touch with their families, reintegrate into their communities and receive "trauma-informed" care, according to a statement from the lawmakers. It would also mandate that incarcerated women receive "basic hygienic products" for free.

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"For too long, our criminal justice system has treated incarcerated women as an afterthought," Warren said in a statement. "The Dignity for Incarcerated Women Act starts to change our country's approach to helping women in prison by ensuring that they are treated with dignity and equipping them with the tools, resources, and services they need to successfully return to their families and communities."

"Women face unique circumstances in prison. They are often victims of sexual abuse and trauma, and a majority are moms to small kids. The current federal prison system is not properly designed to address these unique circumstance," Booker said in the statement. "It’s time we restore justice to our broken justice system."

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisJD Vance takes aim at culture wars, childless politicians Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Ron Johnson: 'I may not be the best candidate' for 2022 midterms MORE (D-Calif.), along with Warren, Booker and Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinNew York gun rights case before Supreme Court with massive consequences  Schumer leaves door open for second vote on bipartisan infrastructure deal Bipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor MORE (D-Ill.), first introduced the legislation in 2017.

Harris, Booker and Warren are among more than a dozen candidates vying for the Democratic Party's presidential nomination in 2020.