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Sanders backs bill creating reparations study commission

 
 
"If the House and Senate pass that bill, of course I would sign it," he responded. "There needs to be a study."
 
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The issue of reparations for descendants of slavery has become a topic of debate among his fellow 2020 Democratic primary candidates, including Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisSenate GOP's campaign arm rakes in M as Georgia runoffs heat up Biden, Harris to sit with CNN's Tapper in first post-election joint interview The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Capital One — Giuliani denies discussing preemptive pardon with Trump MORE (D-Calif.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOn The Money: McConnell offering new coronavirus relief bill | Biden introduces economic team, vows swift action on relief | Rare Mnuchin-Powell spat takes center stage at COVID-19 hearing Biden introduces economic team, vows swift action on struggling economy Louisville mayor declares racism a public health crisis MORE (D-Mass.).
 
 
Meanwhile, Jackson Lee’s bill has picked up support in Congress, including from Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPressure builds for coronavirus relief with no clear path to deal Top GOP senator warns government funding deal unlikely this week Houston will send residents checks of up to ,200 for pandemic relief MORE (D-Calif.). While it would form a commission to study the issue of reparations, it does not call for black Americans to receive payments.
 
Some House Democrats have backed direct reparations payments, whereas Sanders on Friday appeared to be sticking by his previous position that he wanted to focus on "distressed communities."
 
"But let me also say this: I think that what we need to do ... is to pay real attention to the most distressed communities in America," Sanders said. "We have got to use 10 percent of all federal funds to make sure that kids who need it get the education, get the jobs, get the environmental protection that they need and that would be a major focus of my efforts."
 
Sanders referred to legislation by Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.), a Congressional Black Caucus member and the third-ranking House Democrat, that would require federal programs to direct at least 10 percent of their funds to communities where at least 20 percent of the population has lived below the poverty line for at least the past 30 years.
 
Clyburn and Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerBiden budget pick sparks battle with GOP Senate Policy center calls for new lawmakers to make diverse hires Dangerously fast slaughter speeds are putting animals, people at greater risk during COVID-19 crisis MORE (D-N.J.), who is also running for the Democratic presidential nomination, introduced legislation this week that would expand the 10-20-30 model to apply to a broader set of federal accounts.
 
Sanders has previously come under criticism for his comments on reparations. 
 
Democratic presidential candidate Julián Castro knocked Sanders last month for saying there were better ways to address the issue than "just writing out a check."
 
"However, it’s interesting to me that when it comes to 'Medicare for all,' health care, you know, the response there has been, ‘We need to write a big check.’ That when it comes to tuition-free or debt-free college, the answer has been that we need to write a big check," Castro told CNN.
 
Mike Lillis contributed.