Former Democratic aide pleads guilty to doxing GOP senators attending Kavanaugh hearing

A former congressional Democratic staff member pleaded guilty on Friday to posting private information about Republican senators who took part in the hearings on sexual assault allegations against then-Supreme Court nominee Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughWisconsin Democrats chair bashes Supreme Court decision on voting: 'I am about to explode' Supreme Court blocks Wisconsin from extending absentee voting deadline A woman accuses Biden of sexual assault — and few liberals listen MORE.

Jackson Cosko, 27, pleaded guilty to two counts of making public restricted personal information and one count each of computer fraud, witness tampering and obstruction of justice, The Washington Post reported.

The five federal felony counts carry maximum penalties up to 20 years in prison. In accordance with a plea agreement, prosecutors said a sentencing range of 46 to 57 months applied under federal guidelines.

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Cosko, who has served about four months in jail since he was charged, will be sentenced on June 13, the newspaper noted.

The agreement comes after Cosko was accused of releasing the private information of five Republican senators last year.

Cosko was reportedly upset after he had been fired from the office of Sen. Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanDemocrats urge administration to automatically issue coronavirus checks to more people Mnuchin says Social Security recipients will automatically get coronavirus checks Lawmakers press IRS to get coronavirus checks to seniors MORE (D-N.H.) in May. He said in court filings that he had "engaged in an extraordinarily extensive data theft scheme" by burglarizing the office several times after his ouster to steal sensitive information he could use later.

According to the Post, Cosko said he "became angry" on Sept. 27 as he watched Kavanaugh, President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenators demand more details from Trump on intel watchdog firing Overnight Health Care: Trump steps up attack on WHO | Fauci says deaths could be lower than first projected | House panel warns federal stockpile of medical supplies depleted | Mnuchin, Schumer in talks over relief deal Trump says he'll look into small business loan program restricting casinos MORE’s then-Supreme Court nominee, testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Kavanaugh's hearing came after he was accused of sexual assault by Christine Blasey Ford.

Ford testified before the Senate panel in late September that she had been assaulted by Kavanaugh when they were in high school in the 1980s. He vehemently denied Ford's and two other women's allegations in his own subsequent hearing.

Cosko admitted to the court that he responded to the contentious hearings by anonymously editing the Wikipedia pages of five Republican senators to add their phone numbers and home addresses, according to the Post.

The information was quickly removed when it was discovered, and aides contacted authorities.

Cosko said the group included GOP Senate Judiciary Committee members Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump attacks WHO amid criticism of his coronavirus response Graham backs Trump, vows no money for WHO in next funding bill UN biodiversity chief calls for international ban of 'wet markets' MORE (S.C.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeZoom, grocery delivery, self-isolation: How lawmakers are surviving coronavirus Justice IG pours fuel on looming fight over FISA court Senator Tom Coburn's government oversight legacy MORE (Utah) and Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchBottom line Bottom line Trump administration backs Oracle in Supreme Court battle against Google MORE (Utah) as well as Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulZoom, grocery delivery, self-isolation: How lawmakers are surviving coronavirus Rand Paul volunteering at hospital after negative coronavirus test Georgia governor says he didn't know asymptomatic people could spread coronavirus MORE (R-Ky.) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell to try to pass small business funds Thursday, warns against holding it 'hostage' Overnight Health Care: Trump steps up attack on WHO | Fauci says deaths could be lower than first projected | House panel warns federal stockpile of medical supplies depleted | Mnuchin, Schumer in talks over relief deal House Republicans, key administration officials push for additional funding for coronavirus small business loans MORE (R-Ky.).

Cosko was caught sneaking into Hassan’s office after 10 p.m.  to log on to an aide’s computer. He was recognized by another staffer and ordered to leave, according to court papers.

The other aide then received a threatening email minutes later with the subject line "I own Everything." The message reportedly stated, "If you tell anyone I will leak it all. Emails signal conversations gmails. Senators children’s health information and socials," according to plea papers reviewed by the Post.

Cosko was arrested on Oct. 3.