Dems introduce bill to repeal Trump 'Muslim ban'

Sen. Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsDemocrats want White House hopefuls to cool it on Biden attacks Senators revive effort to create McCain human rights commission Senate Dem to reintroduce bill with new name after 'My Little Pony' confusion MORE (D-Del.) and Rep. Judy ChuJudy May ChuOvernight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Senators unveil sweeping bipartisan health care package | House lawmakers float Medicare pricing reforms | Dems offer bill to guarantee abortion access The Go-Go's rock the stage at annual 'We Write the Songs' DC concert Pelosi faces tipping point on Trump impeachment MORE (D-Calif.) on Wednesday introduced legislation to end President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew EPA rule would expand Trump officials' powers to reject FOIA requests Democratic senator introduces bill to ban gun silencers Democrats: Ex-Commerce aide said Ross asked him to examine adding census citizenship question MORE's ban on travelers to the United States from five Muslim-majority countries.

The legislation, known as the National Origin-Based Antidiscrimination for Nonimmigrants (NO BAN) Act, "repeals the three versions of President Trump’s Muslim ban, strengthens the Immigration and Nationality Act to prohibit discrimination on the basis of religion, and restores the separation of powers by limiting overly broad executive authority to issue future travel bans," its sponsors said in a statement.

ADVERTISEMENT

They added that the measure is supported by more than 90 lawmakers and hundreds of civil rights, faith, national security and community organizations, as well as private companies.

“President Trump’s Muslim Ban is a hateful policy, born from bigotry, that denies both our country and millions of aspiring Americans a better future,” Chu said in the statement.

Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarPelosi, Democratic leaders seek to quell liberal revolt over border bill Sanders unveils student debt plan amid rivalry with Warren Sanders proposes canceling .6 trillion in US student debt MORE (D-Minn.), a co-sponsor of the bill, first referenced the legislation Tuesday on Twitter.

"I ran on a promise to end the President’s hateful Muslim ban," said Omar, one of the first two Muslim women elected to Congress. "No one should be denied basic rights because of their religion, race or national origin. #NoBanAct."

The measure is also co-sponsored by all the senators in the Democratic field of presidential candidates.

Coons said Wednesday on MSNBC "Morning Joe" that the legislation "would prevent this president or a future president from imposing a similar religiously based ban on folks coming into this country, narrowing his powers."

Trump and the White House argue the travel ban is not a Muslim ban. The policy prevents travelers from Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia and Yemen from entering the U.S., and the administration argues it is necessary to protect national security.

Trump's third executive order issuing the ban was upheld in a 5-4 ruling by the Supreme Court last year.

The majority opinion, authored by Chief Justice John Roberts, said Trump was well within his authority to impose the ban based on the president's judgments about national security. Roberts wrote that it was not the court's place to criticize or pass judgment on comments Trump made on the campaign trail about a "total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States" and that the executive order was neutral in not targeting travelers of a specific religion.

In a dissenting opinion, Justice Sonia Sotomayor lashed out at the court's majority, arguing Trump's comments targeting Muslims should have led the justices to strike down the ban.

Legislation introduced to overturn the ban is unlikely to become law with Trump in the White House and Republicans holding a majority in the Senate.

“This is not a bill that I expect to become law in this administration,” Coons acknowledged on MSNBC.

Updated at 12:28 p.m.