Graham advised McConnell to 'keep positive' when talking to Trump

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamOvernight Defense: Shanahan exit shocks Washington | Pentagon left rudderless | Lawmakers want answers on Mideast troop deployment | Senate could vote on Saudi arms deal this week | Pompeo says Trump doesn't want war with Iran Shanahan drama shocks Capitol Hill, leaving Pentagon rudderless Shanahan drama shocks Capitol Hill, leaving Pentagon rudderless MORE (R-S.C.) has some advice for people talking to President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP senator introduces bill to hold online platforms liable for political bias Rubio responds to journalist who called it 'strange' to see him at Trump rally Rubio responds to journalist who called it 'strange' to see him at Trump rally MORE: Stay positive.

Graham, who has emerged as a close ally of the president's, recently told Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Defense: Shanahan exit shocks Washington | Pentagon left rudderless | Lawmakers want answers on Mideast troop deployment | Senate could vote on Saudi arms deal this week | Pompeo says Trump doesn't want war with Iran Senators reach .5B deal on Trump's emergency border request Senators reach .5B deal on Trump's emergency border request MORE (R-Ky.) that he needs to "keep positive" during his interactions with Trump, according to The New York Times.

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The newspaper, citing a senator who overheard the exchange, reported that Graham told the GOP leader that "you got to keep positive, get in fast and get out fast" when talking with Trump.

“Your biggest problem is that he thinks you only call him with bad news,” Graham reportedly continued in his advice to the Senate leader.

While McConnell is known for being strategic and tight-lipped about his plans, Trump uses Twitter to weigh in on topics at any hour. McConnell has told reporters that he's "not a fan of the daily tweets," and routinely declines to comment on Trump's most recent series of posts.

But McConnell, like Graham, is up for reelection in a state won by Trump during the 2016 election and where the president remains popular heading into 2020, when the White House and control of Congress are up for grabs.

McConnell and Trump have largely stuck together publicly on policy, including the recent fight over the president's emergency declaration to construct the U.S.-Mexico border wall.

The Kentucky senator also led Republicans earlier this month in changing the rules to reduce the amount of time it takes for the Senate to confirm most of Trump's nominees.