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Booker, Harris have missed most Senate votes

Booker, Harris have missed most Senate votes
© Greg Nash

Sens. Cory BookerCory BookerWray says FBI not systemically racist BBC apologizes for interview with fake Cory Booker Democrats push Biden to include recurring payments in recovery package MORE (D-N.J.) and Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisElla Emhoff, inauguration designer join forces on knitwear collaboration Who is the Senate parliamentarian and why is she important? In America, women are frontliners of change MORE (D-Calif.), who are among the six Democratic senators running for the White House, have missed the most votes in the Senate so far this year.

Booker and Harris have both missed 16 roll call votes on the Senate floor, according to a Hill analysis of the 77 total roll call votes the Senate has held since the start of the 116th Congress in January.

Spokespeople for Booker's and Harris's Senate offices didn't immediately respond to a request for comment about their votes. Their absences didn't change the ultimate outcome of any of the votes.

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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersIntercept bureau chief: minimum wage was not 'high priority' for Biden in COVID-19 relief Murkowski never told White House she would oppose Tanden Tanden withdraws nomination as Biden budget chief MORE (I-Vt.) has missed seven votes so far this year, according to The Hill's analysis, including a vote where Republicans squashed an effort to block the Trump administration from lifting sanctions against three business connected to Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska.

Sens. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandGillibrand: Cuomo allegations 'completely unacceptable' Democrats push Biden to include recurring payments in recovery package Pelosi: Sexual harassment allegations against Cuomo 'credible' MORE (D-N.Y.) and Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharBill introduced to create RBG monument on Capitol Hill Lawmakers offer gun control bill to end 'boyfriend loophole' Juan Williams: Hypocrisy runs riot in GOP MORE (D-Minn.), who are also running for the party's nomination, have missed three votes each, while Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOvernight Health Care: Biden says US will have enough vaccine for all adults by end of May | Biden calls on all states to vaccinate teachers by the end of March | Texas, Mississippi lift mask mandates Biden picks for financial agencies offer preview of regulatory agenda Becerra tells Warren he will do 'thorough review' of executive actions on drug prices MORE (D-Mass.) has missed one vote.

Harris's missed votes include David Bernhardt's nomination to be Interior and a slate of district judges.

She was campaigning in Iowa last Thursday, the same day the Senate held its final vote on Bernhardt.

Harris did put a statement into the Congressional Record specifying that had she been present, she would have opposed his nomination.

"I was absent for vote No. 77 on Executive Calendar No. 200, the nomination of David Bernhardt to be Secretary of the Interior. Had I been present, I would have voted no on the nomination," Harris wrote.

Harris also missed the two votes where Republicans used the "nuclear option" to speed up confirmation of most of Trump's nominees, as well as two failed votes on a stalled disaster aid package meant to respond to a spate of recent storms, wildfires and hurricanes.

Republicans criticized her for missing the disaster recovery votes, with the conservative group America Rising arguing that "running for president is more important to Harris than helping Californians."

Booker's missed votes also include Bernhardt's nomination and a slate of district judges, both of which would have been able to pass without any Democratic support, assuming the Senate's Republicans were present.

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Booker, a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, was also the only senator to miss the vote confirming John Abizaid as U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia. He also missed the formal roll out of Sanders's "Medicare for All" bill, which he is supporting, but spoke at the North America’s Building Trades Unions conference in Washington on the same day. 

Republicans have also missed some roll call votes this year.

Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.), who is up for reelection to his Senate seat next year, has missed 11 roll call votes so far this year, putting him in third place behind Harris and Booker for the number of missed Senate floor votes.

After that are Sens. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrChamber of Commerce labels Biden removal of NLRB general counsel 'extreme' Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote Senators given no timeline on removal of National Guard, Capitol fence MORE (R-N.C.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) who have both missed eight votes, and Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate confirms Rouse as Biden's top economist Overnight Health Care: 50 million coronavirus vaccines given | Pfizer news | Biden health nominees Rand Paul criticized for questioning of transgender health nominee MORE (R-Ky.), who has missed seven. None of the three senators are up for reelection in 2020.

It also isn’t the first time senators vying for their party's presidential nomination have missed Senate votes.

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTanden withdraws nomination as Biden budget chief Boehner book jacket teases slams against Cruz, Trump Senate confirms Biden Commerce secretary pick Gina Raimondo MORE (R-Texas), who was in the middle of a White House bid, and Sanders led the Senate for the most votes missed during the first quarter of 2016. Cruz and Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioGOP senators question Amazon on removal of book about 'transgender moment' CPAC, all-in for Trump, is not what it used to be Watch live: Day 2 at CPAC MORE (R-Fla.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTanden withdraws nomination as Biden budget chief FBI director faces lawmaker frustration over Capitol breach Juan Williams: Hypocrisy runs riot in GOP MORE (R-S.C.), who both ran for president in 2016, also missed the most Senate votes in 2015.

Rubio, who had the worst attendance record, missed 35 percent, or 120 of the 339 roll votes, during the past year, according to GovTrack at the time.