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Romney 'sickened' by Trump's behavior in Mueller report

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneySenate GOP open to confirming Yellen to be Biden's Treasury secretary Overnight Health Care: Moderna to apply for emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine candidate | Hospitals brace for COVID-19 surge | US more than doubles highest number of monthly COVID-19 cases Bipartisan Senate group holding coronavirus relief talks amid stalemate MORE (R-Utah) said Friday that he is "sickened" by the behavior described in special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's report, including the actions of President TrumpDonald John TrumpGeraldo Rivera on Trump sowing election result doubts: 'Enough is enough now' Murkowski: Trump should concede White House race Scott Atlas resigns as coronavirus adviser to Trump MORE.
 
"I am sickened at the extent and pervasiveness of dishonesty and misdirection by individuals in the highest office of the land, including the President," Romney said in a statement posted to Twitter.
 
Romney's comments came a day after Attorney General William BarrBill BarrNew DOJ rule could allow executions by electrocution, firing squad Clyburn: Biden falling short on naming Black figures to top posts Five federal inmates scheduled for execution before Inauguration Day MORE released the 448-page report detailing Mueller's findings from his probe into the 2016 election and the Trump campaign as well as his conclusion that Congress may probe potential obstruction of justice.
Mueller's report details various instances in which White House aides acted to protect the president and themselves by ignoring certain directives from Trump involving probes around his campaign and administration.
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"Reading the report is a sobering revelation of how far we have strayed from the aspirations and principles of the founders," Romney said Friday. 
 
While the report found no collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign, it went into extensive detail about Russian efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, including documenting "numerous links" and conversations between Trump campaign officials and Moscow.
 
"Although ... the Campaign expected it would benefit electorally from information stolen and released through Russian efforts, the investigation did not establish that members of the Trump Campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference activities," Mueller wrote. 
 
Romney, in his statement Friday, said that he was "appalled" that members of the Trump campaign would welcome help from Russian officials. 
 
"I am appalled that, among other things, fellow citizens working in a campaign for president welcomed help from Russia—including information that had been illegally obtained; that none of them acted to inform American law enforcement," Romney said. 
 
Romney's pushback against the behavior of Trump and White House aides described in Mueller's report comes as Senate Republicans, who are scattered around the country because of the two-week holiday recess, have largely stopped short of weighing in on the details of the report. 
 
 
And Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham: Trump should attend Biden inauguration 'if' Biden wins Biden budget pick sparks battle with GOP Senate Georgia governor rejects Trump's call to 'overrule' elections officials with emergency powers MORE (R-S.C.), the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, used his initial statement on the report to praise Barr, who has become the focus of Democratic ire over his handling of Mueller's findings.
 
Romney added Friday that it was "good news that there was insufficient evidence" to charge Trump with conspiring with Russia during the 2016 election or obstructing justice. 
 
"The alternative would have taken us through a wrenching process with the potential for constitutional crisis," he said. "The business of government can move on."