Collins: Mueller report includes 'an unflattering portrayal' of Trump

Collins: Mueller report includes 'an unflattering portrayal' of Trump
© Stefani Reynolds

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Stagwell President Mark Penn says Trump is losing on fighting the virus; Fauci says U.S. 'going in the wrong direction' in fight against virus GOP senators debate replacing Columbus Day with Juneteenth as a federal holiday Senate passes extension of application deadline for PPP small-business loans MORE (R-Maine) said Friday that special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's report gives an "unflattering portrayal" of President TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse panel approves 0.5B defense policy bill House panel votes against curtailing Insurrection Act powers after heated debate House panel votes to constrain Afghan drawdown, ask for assessment on 'incentives' to attack US troops MORE, including an effort to oust the former FBI director from his special counsel role.

“He was not only very upset by the special counsel’s investigations, but tried several times through intermediaries to end it, and it is an unflattering portrayal of the President," Collins told Maine Public Radio.

Her comments come after Attorney General William BarrBill BarrBarr praises Seattle police chief as officers clear protest zone Judge strikes down Trump administration rule denying asylum to most migrants at southern border Supreme Court declines challenge to DOJ execution method MORE released the 448-page report on Thursday, detailing Mueller's findings from the probe into the 2016 election and the Trump campaign as well as his conclusion that Congress may probe potential obstruction of justice.

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As part of the obstruction section of his report, Mueller detailed 10 "episodes," including efforts by Trump to end the investigation, both when it was being overseen by former FBI Director James Comes and then by Mueller.

In one episode described by Mueller, Trump in 2017 ordered then-White House counsel Don McGahn to tell Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinRepublicans release newly declassified intelligence document on FBI source Steele GOP's Obama-era probes fuel Senate angst Graham postpones Russia probe subpoena vote as tensions boil over MORE to get rid of the special counsel. But McGahn refused, warning that he would rather resign.

In a subsequent episode described by Mueller, Trump in 2018 then tried to get McGahn to deny that he ever asked the White House counsel to help fire Mueller.

Trump, as described in the Mueller report, also tried several times to get then-Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsDoug Jones cuts pro-mask campaign ad: 'Our health depends on each other' The Hill's Morning Report - Republicans shift, urge people to wear masks Push to oust Manhattan attorney sparks fresh crisis for DOJ MORE to reverse his decision to recuse himself from the investigation and take over the probe.

Collins, who is a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, told Maine NPR on Friday that she believed Mueller's report was a "very thorough undertaking."

"The Russians were determined to try to influence public opinion and interfere in our elections, and that is a serious threat to our democratic institution,” Collins said.

Collins, who is up for reelection in 2020, isn't the only GOP senator raising early alarm bells over parts of the Mueller report.

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyOvernight Defense: Lawmakers demand answers on reported Russian bounties for US troops deaths in Afghanistan | Defense bill amendments target Germany withdrawal, Pentagon program giving weapons to police Senators aim to limit Trump's ability to remove troops from Germany Voters must strongly reject the president's abuses by voting him out this November MORE (R-Utah) said in a statement on Friday that he was "sickened" by some of the behavior described in the report, including actions by Trump.

"I am sickened at the extent and pervasiveness of dishonesty and misdirection by individuals in the highest office of the land, including the President," Romney said in a statement posted to Twitter.