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2020 Dems back repeal of controversial New Hampshire voting law

2020 Dems back repeal of controversial New Hampshire voting law
© Greg Nash

Democratic presidential hopefuls are lining up behind a push by Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenJustice indicts two members of ISIS 'Beatles' cell ISIS militants expected to be sent to US for prosecution: report New Hampshire poll finds Biden up 8 points over Trump MORE (D-N.H.) to oppose a New Hampshire law that would require college students be permanent residents to vote.

Shaheen sent a letter on Monday asking 2020 Democratic White House hopefuls to sign a petition opposing the law, which will go into effect in July. It requires out-of-state residents like college students to pay to obtain a state driver’s license and register their cars within 60 days of casting a ballot.

Several 2020 candidates quickly backed Shaheen's effort to build opposition to the state law, which is being challenged in court, arguing it limits who can participate in the crucial early primary that will help shape the crowded Democratic field.

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Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisUndecided voters in Arizona wary of Trump, crave stability Foreign policy is on the ballot in 2020; so is American credibility Perez on Biden's poll leads: Democrats 'take nothing for granted' MORE (D-Calif.) said on Monday that the New Hampshire law, signed by Gov. Chris Sununu (R) last year, "is intended to disenfranchise college students from."

"The New Hampshire voter suppression law is intended to disenfranchise college students from exercising their right to vote," Harris said in a tweet.

 

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBooker 'outs' Cruz as vegan; Cruz jokingly decries 'scurrilous attack' Why Latinos should oppose Barrett confirmation Judiciary Committee sets vote on Barrett's nomination for next week MORE (D-N.J.), another 2020 candidate, added that protecting a student's "right to vote is paramount."

 

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharSenate Democrats seek to alleviate public concern about some results not being available on election night Washington flooded with Women's March protesters ahead of Barrett confirmation vote Supreme Court battle turns into 2020 proxy war MORE (D-Minn.), Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandHillicon Valley: Facebook, Twitter's handling of New York Post article raises election night concerns | FCC to move forward with considering order targeting tech's liability shield | YouTube expands polices to tackle QAnon Democrats question Amazon over reported interference of workers' rights to organize Dueling town halls represent high stakes for Trump MORE (D-N.Y.) and former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeTexas Dems highlight health care in fight to flip state House Union leader vows 'infrequent' minority voters will help deliver Biden victory Jimmy Carter says his son smoked pot with Willie Nelson on White House roof MORE (D-Texas) are also throwing their support behind Shaheen, who formerly served as governor of New Hampshire.

O'Rourke called the state law "wrong" and "must be overturned," while Gillibrand said she is supporting "efforts to amend and repeal this bill."

 

The New Hampshire House passed a bill last month to reverse the new requirements. It still needs to pass the state Senate, which held a hearing on the proposal earlier this month, before it would be sent to Sununu.

"The last time I checked people don’t want to give up their freedom to vote. We could make it even easier if we passed my bill to register every eligible young person when they turn 18!" Klobuchar added.

Currently, New Hampshire law requires that registered voters only prove "domicile" rather than permanent residency. But Republicans have stewed over the state's voter registration laws for years.

Trump, who lost the state to Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham Clinton Rally crowd chants 'lock him up' as Trump calls Biden family 'a criminal enterprise' Undecided voters in Arizona wary of Trump, crave stability Push to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw MORE, has claimed that "thousands" of people were brought into the state from Massachusetts to vote in 2016.

"If you look at what happened in New Hampshire, where thousands of people came up and voted from a very liberal part of Massachusetts and they came up in buses and they voted," Trump told The Daily Caller last year.

A months-long investigation by New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner, a Democrat elected to his post by the Republican-led legislature, and the state's Justice Department found no evidence of widespread fraud.

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenPush to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw Georgia senator mocks Harris's name before Trump rally: 'Kamala-mala-mala, I don't know' Warren, Porter to headline progressive fundraiser supporting seven swing state candidates MORE (D-Mass.), who is running for the party's nomination, called the New Hampshire law "wrong."


Shaheen, in her letter, argued that the new requirements amount to a "poll tax" that is trying to "subvert voting rights."

"They are being disenfranchised by photo ID requirements, arbitrary challenges to residency, and unfounded allegations of fraud. This new law, by effectively creating a poll tax on college students, is just the latest attempt to undermine Americans’ constitutionally-protected right to vote," Shaheen wrote in the letter to the party's presidential contenders.