Schumer calls for briefing on 2020 election security after Mueller report

Schumer calls for briefing on 2020 election security after Mueller report
© Greg Nash

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTurf war derails bipartisan push on surprise medical bills Senate confirms Trump's nominee to lead FDA CEO group pushes Trump, Congress on paid family, medical leave MORE (D-N.Y.) is calling for the Trump administration to brief the Senate on what actions it is taking to prevent interference in the 2020 presidential election.

"The Senate should be briefed directly by leaders of the Department of Homeland Security, FBI, and Cyber Command, in a classified space, on what, if any, actions are underway to protect the 2020 election cycle and whether additional authorities or resources are required," Schumer wrote in a letter Tuesday to the Senate Democratic Caucus. "We need to ensure the leaders of these organizations have their voices heard."

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His letter comes as lawmakers have their first chance after a two-week recess to discuss in person what steps they want to take in the wake of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerJeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay Trump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts MORE's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Schumer, who predicted that Senate Democrats would have a "robust internal caucus discussion," outlined "a few bipartisan actions" the upper chamber could start on, including the briefing, ahead of the 2020 election.

“The Trump Administration is not forcefully and adequately responding to the attack on our democracy outlined in the Mueller Report. The United States Senate can and should fill this vacuum with serious debate and action,” Schumer wrote.

Schumer is also calling on the Senate to pass additional Russia sanctions legislation and include additional money in government funding bills for carrying out elections and bolstering the country's election infrastructure.

But any additional legislation potentially faces an uphill battle in the GOP-controlled Senate.

Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioWhite House makes push for paid family leave and child care reform Tom Hanks weighs in on primary: 'Anybody can become president' GOP senator blocks bill aimed at preventing Russia election meddling MORE (R-Fla.) and Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenOvernight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — House passes sweeping Pelosi bill to lower drug prices | Senate confirms Trump FDA pick | Trump officials approve Medicaid work requirements in South Carolina Senate confirms Trump's nominee to lead FDA GOP senator blocks bill aimed at preventing Russia election meddling MORE (D-Md.) previously introduced legislation that would impose penalties for future election interference, while Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump: 'I wouldn't mind' a long Senate impeachment process Poll finds Graham with just 2-point lead on Democratic challenger Hill editor-in-chief calls IG report 'a game-changer' MORE (R-S.C.) rolled out the "sanctions bill from hell." Neither cleared Congress in the lead up to the 2018 election.

Meanwhile, Sens. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Lankford to be named next Senate Ethics chairman Trump to sign order penalizing colleges over perceived anti-Semitism on campus: report MORE (R-Okla.) and Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSenate gears up for battle over witnesses in impeachment trial Booker says he will not make December debate stage Yang: 2020 rivals in Senate should be able to campaign amid impeachment MORE (D-Minn.) have offered election security legislation. But Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntOn The Money: Lawmakers strike spending deal | US, China reach limited trade deal ahead of tariff deadline | Lighthizer fails to quell GOP angst over new NAFTA Lighthizer fails to quell GOP angst on trade deal Republicans consider skipping witnesses in Trump impeachment trial MORE (R-Mo.), the chairman of the Rules Committee, has indicated he doesn't believe additional legislation is needed.

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