Schumer calls for briefing on 2020 election security after Mueller report

Schumer calls for briefing on 2020 election security after Mueller report
© Greg Nash

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSaagar Enjeti: Biden's latest blunder; Krystal Ball: Did Schumer blow our chance to beat McConnell? Johnson eyes Irish border in Brexit negotiations Lewandowski on potential NH Senate run: If I run, 'I'm going to win' MORE (D-N.Y.) is calling for the Trump administration to brief the Senate on what actions it is taking to prevent interference in the 2020 presidential election.

"The Senate should be briefed directly by leaders of the Department of Homeland Security, FBI, and Cyber Command, in a classified space, on what, if any, actions are underway to protect the 2020 election cycle and whether additional authorities or resources are required," Schumer wrote in a letter Tuesday to the Senate Democratic Caucus. "We need to ensure the leaders of these organizations have their voices heard."

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His letter comes as lawmakers have their first chance after a two-week recess to discuss in person what steps they want to take in the wake of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerMueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony MORE's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Schumer, who predicted that Senate Democrats would have a "robust internal caucus discussion," outlined "a few bipartisan actions" the upper chamber could start on, including the briefing, ahead of the 2020 election.

“The Trump Administration is not forcefully and adequately responding to the attack on our democracy outlined in the Mueller Report. The United States Senate can and should fill this vacuum with serious debate and action,” Schumer wrote.

Schumer is also calling on the Senate to pass additional Russia sanctions legislation and include additional money in government funding bills for carrying out elections and bolstering the country's election infrastructure.

But any additional legislation potentially faces an uphill battle in the GOP-controlled Senate.

Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioGOP group calls on Republican senators to stand up to McConnell on election security in new ads What the gun safety debate says about Washington Trump moves forward with F-16 sale to Taiwan opposed by China MORE (R-Fla.) and Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenSenate Democrats push Trump to permanently shutter migrant detention facility USDA eases relocation timeline as researchers flee agency Fed to launch real-time payments system in 2023 MORE (D-Md.) previously introduced legislation that would impose penalties for future election interference, while Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP group calls on Republican senators to stand up to McConnell on election security in new ads Cindy McCain says no one in Republican Party carries 'voice of reason' after husband's death Trump says he'll decide on foreign aid cuts within a week MORE (R-S.C.) rolled out the "sanctions bill from hell." Neither cleared Congress in the lead up to the 2018 election.

Meanwhile, Sens. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordGOP group calls on Republican senators to stand up to McConnell on election security in new ads Hillicon Valley: GOP hits back over election security bills | Ratcliffe out for intel chief | Social media companies consider policies targeting 'deepfakes' | Capital One, GitHub sued over breach The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden camp feels boost after Detroit debate MORE (R-Okla.) and Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSenate Democrats push for arms control language in defense policy bill The Hill's Morning Report - Trump hews to NRA on guns and eyes lower taxes Harris to appear in CNN climate town hall after backlash MORE (D-Minn.) have offered election security legislation. But Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntGOP group calls on Republican senators to stand up to McConnell on election security in new ads Ex-CIA chief worries campaigns falling short on cybersecurity GOP group targets McConnell over election security bills in new ad MORE (R-Mo.), the chairman of the Rules Committee, has indicated he doesn't believe additional legislation is needed.

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