McConnell: Changes to tax law to fund infrastructure a 'non-starter'

McConnell: Changes to tax law to fund infrastructure a 'non-starter'
© Greg Nash

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Senate leaves until September without coronavirus relief agreement | Weekly jobless claims fall below 1 million for first time since March | Trump says no Post Office funding means Democrats 'can't have universal mail-in voting' Overnight Health Care: Senate leaves until September without coronavirus relief deal | US records deadliest day of summer | Georgia governor drops lawsuit over Atlanta's mask mandate Senate leaves until September without coronavirus relief deal MORE (R-Ky.) on Tuesday said that proposals to pay for infrastructure improvements by rolling back 2017 tax cuts were off the table, according to The Washington Post.

The Kentucky senator said that the tax bill was responsible for the “robust economy” and he would not back a plan to “step on growth.”

“That’s a non-starter,” McConnell told reporters when asked about the proposal. “This tax bill is what’s generated this robust economy, and the last thing we wanna do is step on all of this growth by stepping back and repealing, in effect, what has generated all of this prosperity and low unemployment.”

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Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) and House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSusan Collins asks postmaster general to address delays of 'critically needed mail' Trump says he'd sign bill funding USPS but won't seek changes to help mail voting On The Money: Senate leaves until September without coronavirus relief agreement | Weekly jobless claims fall below 1 million for first time since March | Trump says no Post Office funding means Democrats 'can't have universal mail-in voting' MORE (D-Calif.) reportedly reached an agreement during a White House meeting Tuesday with President TrumpDonald John TrumpUSPS warns Pennsylvania mail-in ballots may not be delivered in time to be counted Michael Cohen book accuses Trump of corruption, fraud Trump requests mail-in ballot for Florida congressional primary MORE to seek a deal on a $2 trillion infrastructure bill.

They said they did not reach an agreement with the White House on how to pay for the package, but vowed to meet in three weeks to brainstorm ideas on funding.

Other Republican leaders have also blasted the idea of revisiting the 2017 tax cuts to pay for the package.

“The common denominator, no matter what the subject the Democrats bring up, is a tax increase,” House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyQAnon-supporting congressional candidate embraced 9/11 conspiracy theory Win by QAnon believer creates new headaches for House GOP GOP leaders go into attack mode against Harris MORE (R-Calif.) told reporters before the meeting Tuesday. “[On] infrastructure, they’ll only agree to something unless they’re able to raise taxes.”

Congressional Republicans, none of whom were invited to the Tuesday meeting, have said they will only support an infrastructure package with no tax increases.

“Obviously, Speaker Pelosi didn't go into the meeting with any pay-fors today,” House Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseWin by QAnon believer creates new headaches for House GOP Scott Fitzgerald wins Wisconsin GOP primary to replace Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner GOP leaders go into attack mode against Harris MORE (R-La.) said.

“So at some point, they're going to have to show how they would pay for it — we've been trying to negotiate with them on a bill that will be fully paid for, with no new taxes.”