Klobuchar pressures Barr, Mueller for more information on special counsel's findings

Klobuchar pressures Barr, Mueller for more information on special counsel's findings
© Greg Nash

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharElection security advocates see strong ally in Harris The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - The choice: Biden-Harris vs. Trump-Pence California Democrats back Yang after he expresses disappointment over initial DNC lineup MORE (D-Minn.) is pressing both Attorney General William BarrBill BarrHillicon Valley: 'Fortnite' owner sues Apple after game is removed from App Store | Federal agencies seize, dismantle cryptocurrency campaigns of major terrorist organizations Federal agencies seize, dismantle cryptocurrency campaigns of major terrorist organizations How would a Biden Justice Department be different? MORE and special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE for more information about the report into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

“We need more information from both Special Counsel Mueller and Attorney General Barr following last week’s Senate hearing and the release of the Special Counsel’s report,” Klobuchar, a 2020 presidential candidate, said in a statement. 

“The Attorney General’s mischaracterizations of the redacted report’s findings have raised more questions than they have answered. The American people deserve a Justice Department that is committed to the impartial administration of justice and I will continue to press for answers on their behalf,” she noted.

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In her letter to Mueller, Klobuchar requested further information on his interactions with Barr after the special counsel sent his report to the Department of Justice. 

The request comes after Mueller wrote a letter to Barr on March 27 expressing concerns about the attorney general's four-page summary of the report. The Justice Department eventually released a redacted version of the full report. 

Klobuchar submitted a number of questions, including whether Mueller agreed with Barr’s characterization of the report and the conduct of former Trump campaign manager Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortTrump says he would consider pardons for those implicated in Mueller investigation Graham releases newly declassified documents on Russia probe The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Argentum - Mask mandates, restrictions issued as COVID-19 spreads MORE and former White House counsel Don McGahn during the course of the investigation. 

The senator also made public questions she had sent to Barr, including about whether the special counsel had reviewed President TrumpDonald John TrumpUSPS warns Pennsylvania mail-in ballots may not be delivered in time to be counted Michael Cohen book accuses Trump of corruption, fraud Trump requests mail-in ballot for Florida congressional primary MORE’s tax returns and Trump Organization’s financial statements, and whether Barr believed the findings of the report constituted evidence that Trump obstructed justice during the investigation. 

Russian cyberattacks and disinformation campaigns during the 2016 presidential election were also a focus of Klobuchar’s questions to Barr.

Klobuchar asked whether the Justice Department had notified all the voting technology companies that were targeted by Russia in 2016, and what steps were being taken by the Justice Department to prevent this type of attack on election infrastructure during future elections. 

Additionally, Klobuchar asked Barr about the 3,500 Facebook advertisements purchased by the Russian Internet Research Agency in 2016, and what steps the Justice Department is taking to ensure this does not happen again.

Klobuchar, along with Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham says FBI chief 'committed to being helpful' after Trump criticism Democrat flips GOP-held state House seat in South Carolina Ron Johnson signals some GOP senators concerned about his Obama-era probes MORE (R-S.C.) and Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerHillicon Valley: 'Fortnite' owner sues Apple after game is removed from App Store | Federal agencies seize, dismantle cryptocurrency campaigns of major terrorist organizations Election security advocates see strong ally in Harris Democrats ramp up warnings on Russian election meddling MORE (D-Va.), reintroduced the Honest Ads Act on Wednesday. The bill is intended to mitigate foreign threats to U.S. elections by increasing the transparency of political advertisements on social media platforms.