SPONSORED:

Trump Jr. reaches deal to testify with Senate Intelligence

Donald Trump Jr.Don TrumpTrump Jr.: There are 'plenty' of GOP incumbents who should be challenged Donald Trump Jr. attacks Cheney at CPAC: 'Lincoln Project Liz' Trump Jr. was deposed in inauguration funds probe MORE has agreed to appear before the Senate Intelligence Committee for a second round of questions, complying with a subpoena from Chairman Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrSenators given no timeline on removal of National Guard, Capitol fence Passage of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act is the first step to heal our democracy Overnight Health Care: COVID-19 vaccine makers pledge massive supply increase | Biden health nominee faces first Senate test | White House defends reopening of facility for migrant kids MORE (R-N.C.), who came under fire from fellow Republicans for demanding the testimony.

Trump Jr. struck the deal Tuesday to interview with the panel next month for between two and four hours. The committee had originally a set a 5 p.m. deadline on Monday for him to respond.

Questions about the Trump Tower project in Moscow and the June 2016 Trump Tower meeting between Trump campaign officials and Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya are fair game, according to a source who was briefed on the deal.

Another source said the committee outlined 10 topics it hoped to discuss with Trump Jr., but the scope of the interview was negotiated down to six topics. The two sides also agreed this would be Trump Jr.’s last appearance before the committee.

ADVERTISEMENT

The agreement ends a tense standoff that divided Republican lawmakers for the past week.

President TrumpDonald TrumpNoem touts South Dakota coronavirus response, knocks lockdowns in CPAC speech On The Trail: Cuomo and Newsom — a story of two embattled governors McCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP takes back lower chamber in 2022 MORE’s staunchest allies, including Sens. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulOvernight Health Care: 50 million coronavirus vaccines given | Pfizer news | Biden health nominees Rand Paul criticized for questioning of transgender health nominee Haley isolated after Trump fallout MORE (R-Ky.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzNoem touts South Dakota coronavirus response, knocks lockdowns in CPAC speech Sunday shows preview: 2024 hopefuls gather at CPAC; House passes coronavirus relief; vaccine effort continues Texas attorney general hits links with Trump before CPAC appearance MORE (R-Texas), as well as House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyMcCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP takes back lower chamber in 2022 Democrats don't trust GOP on 1/6 commission: 'These people are dangerous' Sunday shows preview: 2024 hopefuls gather at CPAC; House passes coronavirus relief; vaccine effort continues MORE (R-Calif.), argued that calling Trump Jr. before the committee for another round of questioning was unnecessary after special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump MORE failed to find evidence of conspiracy between Trump’s 2016 campaign and Russia.

The intense pressure raised questions about whether Burr would back down.

Burr’s committee has been negotiating with Trump Jr. since December to appear for a second time to answer questions. The first time, Trump Jr. only answered questions from committee staff.

Trump Jr. initially agreed to testify to the committee in March but then backed out and rescheduled his appearance for April, according to a briefing that Burr gave to Senate GOP colleagues last week.

When Trump Jr. again broke his agreement to appear before the committee last month, the Intelligence Committee warned he would face a subpoena.

The source said Trump Jr.’s lawyers initially declined to let their client appear for a second grilling after the Mueller report failed to find any criminal misconduct. But faced with extended civil litigation or a possible Senate vote on contempt, Trump Jr. on Tuesday agreed to appear for a second time.

Trump Jr. had been holding out as he sought restrictions on the amount of time he would spend before the committee and the scope of the questions he’d have to answer.

Trump Jr.’s legal team drafted a letter, which was viewed by The Hill, explaining that he would not plead the Fifth but that he would defy the subpoena and risk being held in contempt of Congress.

In the letter, which was never sent, the lawyers argued that Trump Jr. had already testified for 25 hours, which they said was 14 hours longer than former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMedia circles wagons for conspiracy theorist Neera Tanden The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Senate ref axes minimum wage, House votes today on relief bill Democratic strategists start women-run media consulting firm MORE testified about the deadly attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

His lawyers questioned the committee’s motives for calling Trump Jr. back for testimony, arguing that there was no reason for him to respond to claims made by Trump’s former attorney Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenThe Memo: Trump faces deepening legal troubles Trump lashes out after Supreme Court decision on his financial records Supreme Court declines to shield Trump's tax returns from Manhattan DA MORE, who pleaded guilty to lying to Congress and is serving a prison sentence.

At 4:15 p.m. on Monday, 45 minutes before the deadline, the committee staff called Trump Jr.’s legal team to extend the deadline by 24 hours in hopes of reaching a deal. The two sides came to an agreement late in the afternoon on Tuesday, just before the deadline expired.

President Trump on Tuesday called the treatment of his eldest son “very unfair.”

“It’s really a tough situation because my son spent, I guess, over 20 hours testifying about something that [special counsel Robert] Mueller said was 100 percent OK,” Trump told reporters at the White House. “And now they want him to testify again. I don’t know why. I have no idea why. But it seems very unfair to me."

The fight over Trump Jr.’s appearance had become a distraction in the Senate, where Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamOvernight Defense: Biden sends message with Syria airstrike | US intel points to Saudi crown prince in Khashoggi killing | Pentagon launches civilian-led sexual assault commission Graham: Trump will 'be helpful' to all Senate GOP incumbents John Boehner tells Cruz to 'go f--- yourself' in unscripted audiobook asides: report MORE (R-S.C.) on Sunday took the highly unusual step of urging the president’s son to ignore his colleague’s subpoena.

In doing so, Graham broke one of the Senate’s unwritten rules, as it is considered bad form to even speak for a colleague. Urging a potential witness to ignore a colleague’s subpoena is on a whole other level.

Burr appeared annoyed Tuesday when asked about Graham’s advice.

“I’m not addressing any questions on witnesses and [if] that’s what they’re commenting on. You need to talk to Lindsey,” Burr said. “Go talk to them and ask them what they meant.”

“I’m not going to address anything that deals with engagement of witnesses. Period. End of end of sentence,” he said, growing red in the face. “If you guys have got some real questions, shoot ‘em. If not, thank you, good try. I’m not going to answer them.”

Graham, a Trump ally who is up for reelection next year, made a splash over the weekend when he told Fox Business, “If I were Donald Trump Jr.’s lawyer, I would tell him, ‘You don’t need to go back into this environment anymore. You’ve been there for hours and hours and hours and nothing being alleged here changes the outcome of the Mueller investigation.’ ”

The statement sparked an angry backlash from Democrats and puzzled responses from GOP colleagues.

By Tuesday morning more than 65,000 people were using #LindseyGrahamResign on Twitter after a Democratic super PAC urged supporters to retweet it.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), a member of the Judiciary Committee, said that Graham’s statement conflicted with statements he made while serving in the House arguing that former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonTrumpists' assaults on Republicans who refuse to drink the Kool-Aid will help Democrats The Jan. 6 case for ending the Senate filibuster Mellman: White working-class politics MORE could be impeached for failing to cooperate with congressional subpoenas.  

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerSunday shows preview: 2024 hopefuls gather at CPAC; House passes coronavirus relief; vaccine effort continues Democrats demand Saudi accountability over Khashoggi killing US intel: Saudi crown prince approved Khashoggi killing MORE (D-Va.), the vice chairman of the Intelligence Committee, took a little jab at Graham by arguing that potential witnesses are more likely to comply with his committee’s subpoenas because it’s viewed as less partisan than the Judiciary panel.

“I know there’s been a long history of ignoring some of the Judiciary Committee subpoenas and actions. So far our committee’s not had that approach,” he said.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyGrassley to vote against Tanden nomination Grassley says he'll decide this fall whether to run in 2022 Yellen deputy Adeyemo on track for quick confirmation MORE (R-Iowa), the former chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said Graham’s statement “may be unusual” but noted that Graham “is a lawyer and I’m not.”

Graham’s comment was all the more surprising as it came after Burr explained to colleagues at a meeting Thursday the lengths his committee went to in an effort to get the president’s eldest son to make himself available for a second round of questioning.

On Tuesday, Graham reiterated his argument that Trump Jr. had no obligation to submit himself for new questioning.

“Mueller was the final word, I thought, on Russian activity with the Trump campaign, so you’re going to run into a problem as Congress of getting people to cooperate after they’ve been [before committees] multiple times,” he said. “I’m just making the observation that I’m worried now about where all this is headed.”

Graham’s split with Burr reflects broader division among Republican lawmakers over how hard to press for answers on Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election in the wake of Mueller’s report.  

Paul on Sunday called the subpoena “a real travesty of justice.”

“I think it’s very unfair to the president and the president’s family on this,” he said on John Catsimatidis’s radio show.

But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe bizarre back story of the filibuster The Bible's wisdom about addressing our political tribalism Democrats don't trust GOP on 1/6 commission: 'These people are dangerous' MORE (R-Ky.), Paul’s home-state colleague, defended Burr on Tuesday.

Asked if he agreed with Trump’s charge that Burr was treating Trump Jr. unfairly, McConnell, who is close to Burr, declined to criticize his colleague.

“I asked him to undertake this investigation into Russian collusion a couple of years ago. He's indicated publicly that he believes they will find no collusion and we are hoping that we will get a report sometime soon,” the GOP leader told reporters after a lunch meeting with fellow Republican senators.

Jordan Fabian and Jordain Carney contributed.