Trump Jr. reaches deal to testify with Senate Intelligence

Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpDick Cheney to attend fundraiser supporting Trump reelection: report House chairman warns foreign governments to 'cease and desist' spending money at Trump properties Chris Cuomo: 'I should be better than the guys baiting me' MORE has agreed to appear before the Senate Intelligence Committee for a second round of questions, complying with a subpoena from Chairman Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrHoekstra emerges as favorite for top intelligence post Trump casts uncertainty over top intelligence role Trump withdraws Ratcliffe as Intelligence pick MORE (R-N.C.), who came under fire from fellow Republicans for demanding the testimony.

Trump Jr. struck the deal Tuesday to interview with the panel next month for between two and four hours. The committee had originally a set a 5 p.m. deadline on Monday for him to respond.

Questions about the Trump Tower project in Moscow and the June 2016 Trump Tower meeting between Trump campaign officials and Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya are fair game, according to a source who was briefed on the deal.

Another source said the committee outlined 10 topics it hoped to discuss with Trump Jr., but the scope of the interview was negotiated down to six topics. The two sides also agreed this would be Trump Jr.’s last appearance before the committee.

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The agreement ends a tense standoff that divided Republican lawmakers for the past week.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpO'Rourke: Trump driving global, U.S. economy into recession Manchin: Trump has 'golden opportunity' on gun reforms Objections to Trump's new immigration rule wildly exaggerated MORE’s staunchest allies, including Sens. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGraham promises ObamaCare repeal if Trump, Republicans win in 2020 Conservatives buck Trump over worries of 'socialist' drug pricing Rand Paul to 'limit' August activities due to health MORE (R-Ky.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTrump moves forward with F-16 sale to Taiwan opposed by China The Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape O'Rourke says he will not 'in any scenario' run for Senate MORE (R-Texas), as well as House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyI'm not a Nazi, I'm just a dude: What it's like to be the other Steve King Trump finds consistent foil in 'Squad' Tlaib says she won't visit Israel after being treated like 'a criminal' MORE (R-Calif.), argued that calling Trump Jr. before the committee for another round of questioning was unnecessary after special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony Kellyanne Conway: 'I'd like to know' if Mueller read his own report MORE failed to find evidence of conspiracy between Trump’s 2016 campaign and Russia.

The intense pressure raised questions about whether Burr would back down.

Burr’s committee has been negotiating with Trump Jr. since December to appear for a second time to answer questions. The first time, Trump Jr. only answered questions from committee staff.

Trump Jr. initially agreed to testify to the committee in March but then backed out and rescheduled his appearance for April, according to a briefing that Burr gave to Senate GOP colleagues last week.

When Trump Jr. again broke his agreement to appear before the committee last month, the Intelligence Committee warned he would face a subpoena.

The source said Trump Jr.’s lawyers initially declined to let their client appear for a second grilling after the Mueller report failed to find any criminal misconduct. But faced with extended civil litigation or a possible Senate vote on contempt, Trump Jr. on Tuesday agreed to appear for a second time.

Trump Jr. had been holding out as he sought restrictions on the amount of time he would spend before the committee and the scope of the questions he’d have to answer.

Trump Jr.’s legal team drafted a letter, which was viewed by The Hill, explaining that he would not plead the Fifth but that he would defy the subpoena and risk being held in contempt of Congress.

In the letter, which was never sent, the lawyers argued that Trump Jr. had already testified for 25 hours, which they said was 14 hours longer than former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonLewandowski on potential NH Senate run: If I run, 'I'm going to win' Fighter pilot vs. astronaut match-up in Arizona could determine control of Senate Progressive Democrats' turnout plans simply don't add up MORE testified about the deadly attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

His lawyers questioned the committee’s motives for calling Trump Jr. back for testimony, arguing that there was no reason for him to respond to claims made by Trump’s former attorney Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenI'm not a Nazi, I'm just a dude: What it's like to be the other Steve King Wyden blasts FEC Republicans for blocking probe into NRA over possible Russia donations Hope Hicks defends accuracy of her congressional testimony MORE, who pleaded guilty to lying to Congress and is serving a prison sentence.

At 4:15 p.m. on Monday, 45 minutes before the deadline, the committee staff called Trump Jr.’s legal team to extend the deadline by 24 hours in hopes of reaching a deal. The two sides came to an agreement late in the afternoon on Tuesday, just before the deadline expired.

President Trump on Tuesday called the treatment of his eldest son “very unfair.”

“It’s really a tough situation because my son spent, I guess, over 20 hours testifying about something that [special counsel Robert] Mueller said was 100 percent OK,” Trump told reporters at the White House. “And now they want him to testify again. I don’t know why. I have no idea why. But it seems very unfair to me."

The fight over Trump Jr.’s appearance had become a distraction in the Senate, where Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham warns Trump on Taliban deal in Afghanistan: Learn from 'Obama's mistakes' Appropriators warn White House against clawing back foreign aid Trump meets with national security team on Afghanistan peace plan MORE (R-S.C.) on Sunday took the highly unusual step of urging the president’s son to ignore his colleague’s subpoena.

In doing so, Graham broke one of the Senate’s unwritten rules, as it is considered bad form to even speak for a colleague. Urging a potential witness to ignore a colleague’s subpoena is on a whole other level.

Burr appeared annoyed Tuesday when asked about Graham’s advice.

“I’m not addressing any questions on witnesses and [if] that’s what they’re commenting on. You need to talk to Lindsey,” Burr said. “Go talk to them and ask them what they meant.”

“I’m not going to address anything that deals with engagement of witnesses. Period. End of end of sentence,” he said, growing red in the face. “If you guys have got some real questions, shoot ‘em. If not, thank you, good try. I’m not going to answer them.”

Graham, a Trump ally who is up for reelection next year, made a splash over the weekend when he told Fox Business, “If I were Donald Trump Jr.’s lawyer, I would tell him, ‘You don’t need to go back into this environment anymore. You’ve been there for hours and hours and hours and nothing being alleged here changes the outcome of the Mueller investigation.’ ”

The statement sparked an angry backlash from Democrats and puzzled responses from GOP colleagues.

By Tuesday morning more than 65,000 people were using #LindseyGrahamResign on Twitter after a Democratic super PAC urged supporters to retweet it.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), a member of the Judiciary Committee, said that Graham’s statement conflicted with statements he made while serving in the House arguing that former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonThe magic of majority rule in elections The return of Ken Starr Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress MORE could be impeached for failing to cooperate with congressional subpoenas.  

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerFacebook users in lawsuit say company failed to warn them of known risks before 2018 breach New intel chief inherits host of challenges Overnight Defense: US, Russia tensions grow over nuclear arms | Highlights from Esper's Asia trip | Trump strikes neutral tone on Hong Kong protests | General orders ethics review of special forces MORE (D-Va.), the vice chairman of the Intelligence Committee, took a little jab at Graham by arguing that potential witnesses are more likely to comply with his committee’s subpoenas because it’s viewed as less partisan than the Judiciary panel.

“I know there’s been a long history of ignoring some of the Judiciary Committee subpoenas and actions. So far our committee’s not had that approach,” he said.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGOP senators call for Barr to release full results of Epstein investigation Trump health official: Controversial drug pricing move is 'top priority' Environmental advocates should take another look at biofuels MORE (R-Iowa), the former chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said Graham’s statement “may be unusual” but noted that Graham “is a lawyer and I’m not.”

Graham’s comment was all the more surprising as it came after Burr explained to colleagues at a meeting Thursday the lengths his committee went to in an effort to get the president’s eldest son to make himself available for a second round of questioning.

On Tuesday, Graham reiterated his argument that Trump Jr. had no obligation to submit himself for new questioning.

“Mueller was the final word, I thought, on Russian activity with the Trump campaign, so you’re going to run into a problem as Congress of getting people to cooperate after they’ve been [before committees] multiple times,” he said. “I’m just making the observation that I’m worried now about where all this is headed.”

Graham’s split with Burr reflects broader division among Republican lawmakers over how hard to press for answers on Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election in the wake of Mueller’s report.  

Paul on Sunday called the subpoena “a real travesty of justice.”

“I think it’s very unfair to the president and the president’s family on this,” he said on John Catsimatidis’s radio show.

But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellAre Democrats turning Trump-like? House Democrat calls for gun control: Cities can ban plastic straws but 'we can't ban assault weapons?' Churches are arming and training congregants in response to mass shootings: report MORE (R-Ky.), Paul’s home-state colleague, defended Burr on Tuesday.

Asked if he agreed with Trump’s charge that Burr was treating Trump Jr. unfairly, McConnell, who is close to Burr, declined to criticize his colleague.

“I asked him to undertake this investigation into Russian collusion a couple of years ago. He's indicated publicly that he believes they will find no collusion and we are hoping that we will get a report sometime soon,” the GOP leader told reporters after a lunch meeting with fellow Republican senators.

Jordan Fabian and Jordain Carney contributed.