Romney votes against Trump pick over comments attacking Obama

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyTwo Democrats roll out bill to protect inspectors general from politically motivated firing Senators demand more details from Trump on intel watchdog firing Zoom, grocery delivery, self-isolation: How lawmakers are surviving coronavirus MORE (R-Utah) voted against one of President TrumpDonald John TrumpSanders says he wouldn't 'drop dead' if Trump decided on universal healthcare Overnight Health Care: Trump officials lay groundwork for May reopening | Democrats ramp up talks with Mnuchin on next relief deal | Fauci says death toll could be around 60,000 Hillicon Valley: State officials push for more election funds | Coronavirus surveillance concerns ramp up pressure for privacy bill | Senators warned not to use Zoom | Agencies ask FCC to revoke China Telecom's license MORE’s judicial picks Tuesday over past controversial comments the judge made about former President Obama. 

Romney, who faced off against Obama in the 2012 presidential race, cast the lone GOP no vote against Judge Michael Truncale, who was ultimately confirmed to the Eastern District of Texas by a 49-46 margin.

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Truncale raised eyebrows in 2011 when he called Obama an “un-American imposter.”

He later told the Senate Judiciary Committee that he was “merely expressing frustration by what I perceived as a lack of overt patriotism on behalf of President Obama,” adding that he did not subscribe to “birtherism.”

However, Romney found enough fault with the original remark to vote against Truncale’s nomination. 

“He made particularly disparaging comments about President Obama. And as the Republican nominee for president, I just couldn't subscribe to that in a federal judge,” Romney told Politico in a brief interview.

“This was not a matter of qualifications or politics. This was something specifically to that issue as a former nominee of our party,” he added.

Romney has emerged as one of the few GOP critics of Trump, often hitting the president over his rhetoric. He most recently bucked the White House by opposing its plans to nominate Herman CainHerman CainOn The Money: Trump adviser presses House to make Bezos testify | Kudlow says tax-cut proposal coming this fall | NY Fed says Boeing woes could hurt GDP | Delta aims to be first carbon neutral airline The Hill's Morning Report — AG Barr, GOP senators try to rein Trump in Republicans expect Trump to withdraw controversial Fed nominee MORE to the Federal Reserve Board.

Though he votes in line with the president more often than not, he is more likely to oppose the White House than most other Republican senators, according to a tally compiled by FiveThirtyEight.