Feinstein, Iranian foreign minister had dinner amid tensions: report

Feinstein, Iranian foreign minister had dinner amid tensions: report
© Aaron Schwartz

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinSanders revokes congressional endorsement for Young Turks founder Cenk Uygur Sanders endorses Young Turks founder Cenk Uygur for Katie Hill's former House seat Houston police chief stands by criticism of McConnell, Cruz, Cornyn: 'This is not political' MORE (D-Calif.) had dinner with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif amid escalating U.S.-Iranian tensions, Politico's Playbook reported early Thursday.

The California lawmaker's office told the news outlet the dinner was "arranged in consultation with the State Department."

"The office was in touch with State in advance of the meeting to let them know it was happening and to get an update on U.S.-Iran activity," Feinstein's office added.

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Feinstein's office did not immediately respond to a request for more information about the meeting from The Hill, which also contacted the White House for comment.

The reported dinner comes amid rising tensions between the U.S. and Iran.

The Trump administration earlier this month deployed bombers and an aircraft carrier to the Persian Gulf in response to unspecified threats from Iran.

Earlier this year, the U.S. named Iran’s Revolutionary Guard a terrorist organization. Tehran responded by designating all U.S. forces in the Middle East as terrorists.

On Tuesday, Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoKobach has lead in Kansas Senate race unless Pompeo enters: report The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by AdvaMed — House panel delays impeachment vote until Friday Senate gears up for battle over witnesses in impeachment trial MORE and acting Defense Secretary Patrick ShanahanPatrick Michael ShanahanDefense chief calls on European allies to be wary of China's investments, blasts Russia Pentagon chief approves 20 more miles of border wall Why Dave Norquist is the perfect choice for DOD's deputy secretary MORE briefed lawmakers on intelligence detailing recent actions by Iran, as President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats ask if they have reason to worry about UK result Trump scramble to rack up accomplishments gives conservatives heartburn Seven years after Sandy Hook, the politics of guns has changed MORE and Republicans warn of a growing threat from Tehran.

Trump withdrew from the Obama-era nuclear deal with Iran one year ago and reimposed sanctions on Tehran.