Trump judicial nominee says he withdrew over 'gross mischaracterizations' of record

Trump judicial nominee says he withdrew over 'gross mischaracterizations' of record
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A Michigan attorney who asked the White House to withdraw his nomination to a federal judgeship on Tuesday said in a statement Wednesday that he was forced to bow out over “gross mischaracterizations” of his work as a lawyer.

Michael Bogren, a nominee for the District Court of the Western District of Michigan, withdrew amid Republican concerns over a brief he signed off on defending the city of East Lansing.

Bogren wrote in a statement Wednesday that he had been informed likely Republican opposition had doomed his nomination, saying that was the result of “gross mischaracterizations of my representation of the City of East Lansing” in a 2017 case.

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In the brief, defending the city against a Catholic couple who sued after they were barred from a farmers’ market for refusing to host a same-sex wedding on their farm, Bogren invokes the Ku Klux Klan and imams who oppose allowing women to drive.

“The claim is I compared Catholics to the KKK. That claim is utterly untrue,” Bogren said in a statement Wednesday. “What I argued on behalf of my client is the First Amendment does not create an exception to anti-discrimination laws based on religious beliefs — whatever those religious beliefs might be. It was not my intention to compare Catholics to the KKK, and the brief cannot be fairly read as doing so.”

Bogren said in his statement that he had been the victim of an “unfounded personal attack,” adding “it is truly unfortunate that what used to be a dignified process has sunk to this level.”

Senate Judiciary Committee Republicans, including Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGOP senator introduces bill to hold online platforms liable for political bias GOP lawmaker delays House for second week GOP lawmaker delays House for second week MORE (Texas), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisKoch political arm endorses Colorado Sen. Gardner Koch political arm endorses Colorado Sen. Gardner Overnight Defense: US to send 1K more troops to Mideast amid Iran tensions | Iran threatens to break limit on uranium production in 10 days | US accuses Iran of 'nuclear blackmail' | Details on key defense bill amendments MORE (N.C.) and Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyGOP senator introduces bill to hold online platforms liable for political bias Hillicon Valley: Facebook unveils new cryptocurrency | Waters wants company to halt plans | Democrats look to force votes on election security | Advertisers partner with tech giants on 'digital safety' | House GOP unveils cyber agenda Hillicon Valley: Facebook unveils new cryptocurrency | Waters wants company to halt plans | Democrats look to force votes on election security | Advertisers partner with tech giants on 'digital safety' | House GOP unveils cyber agenda MORE (Mo.), had all expressed concerns about Bogren before his withdrawal, while both of his home state senators, Democrats Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann Stabenow It's time to let Medicare to negotiate drug prices Trump judicial nominee says he withdrew over 'gross mischaracterizations' of record Trump judicial nominee says he withdrew over 'gross mischaracterizations' of record MORE and Gary PetersGary Charles PetersHillicon Valley: GOP senator wants one agency to run tech probes | Huawei expects to lose B in sales from US ban | Self-driving car bill faces tough road ahead | Elon Musk tweets that he 'deleted' his Twitter account Hillicon Valley: GOP senator wants one agency to run tech probes | Huawei expects to lose B in sales from US ban | Self-driving car bill faces tough road ahead | Elon Musk tweets that he 'deleted' his Twitter account New push to regulate self-driving cars faces tough road MORE, had expressed support.