Trump judicial nominee says he withdrew over 'gross mischaracterizations' of record

Trump judicial nominee says he withdrew over 'gross mischaracterizations' of record
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A Michigan attorney who asked the White House to withdraw his nomination to a federal judgeship on Tuesday said in a statement Wednesday that he was forced to bow out over “gross mischaracterizations” of his work as a lawyer.

Michael Bogren, a nominee for the District Court of the Western District of Michigan, withdrew amid Republican concerns over a brief he signed off on defending the city of East Lansing.

Bogren wrote in a statement Wednesday that he had been informed likely Republican opposition had doomed his nomination, saying that was the result of “gross mischaracterizations of my representation of the City of East Lansing” in a 2017 case.

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In the brief, defending the city against a Catholic couple who sued after they were barred from a farmers’ market for refusing to host a same-sex wedding on their farm, Bogren invokes the Ku Klux Klan and imams who oppose allowing women to drive.

“The claim is I compared Catholics to the KKK. That claim is utterly untrue,” Bogren said in a statement Wednesday. “What I argued on behalf of my client is the First Amendment does not create an exception to anti-discrimination laws based on religious beliefs — whatever those religious beliefs might be. It was not my intention to compare Catholics to the KKK, and the brief cannot be fairly read as doing so.”

Bogren said in his statement that he had been the victim of an “unfounded personal attack,” adding “it is truly unfortunate that what used to be a dignified process has sunk to this level.”

Senate Judiciary Committee Republicans, including Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTrade deal talks expand as Congress debates tech legal shield Sanders meets with MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred Cruz knocks Chick-fil-A over past donation: It has 'lost its way' MORE (Texas), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democrats worry about diversity on next debate stage North Carolina congressman says he won't seek reelection after redistricting Overnight Health Care: House to vote next week on drug prices bill | Conway says Trump trying to find 'balance' on youth vaping | US spent trillion on hospitals in 2018 MORE (N.C.) and Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyTikTok's leader to meet with lawmakers next week Overnight Defense: Trump leaves door open to possible troop increase in Middle East | Putin offers immediate extension of key nuclear treaty Trade deal talks expand as Congress debates tech legal shield MORE (Mo.), had all expressed concerns about Bogren before his withdrawal, while both of his home state senators, Democrats Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowBoth sides have reason to want speedy Trump impeachment trial GOP set for all-out battle over Michigan Senate seat Overnight Energy: EPA delays board's review of 'secret science' rules | Keystone pipeline spill affecting more land than thought | Dems seek probe into Forest Service grants tied to Alaska logging MORE and Gary PetersGary Charles PetersTrump to hold campaign rally in Michigan Senators sound alarm on dangers of ransomware attacks after briefing GOP set for all-out battle over Michigan Senate seat MORE, had expressed support.