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McSally on Moore running for Senate again: 'This place has enough creepy old men'

Senate Republicans threw cold water on the prospect of another Senate bid by Roy MooreRoy Stewart MooreLong-shot Espy campaign sees national boost in weeks before election Ocasio-Cortez slams Tulsi Gabbard for amplifying ballot harvesting video Doug Jones says he will not support Supreme Court nominee before election MORE, who announced his candidacy Thursday, according to Politico.

“Give me a break. This place has enough creepy old men,” Sen. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallySenate is leaning to the Democrats, big time, with a wave Cunningham, Tillis locked in tight race in North Carolina: poll Senate Republicans offer constitutional amendment to block Supreme Court packing MORE (R-Ariz.) told the publication in response to Moore’s announcement.

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Moore won the Republican primary for the seat in 2017, beating former Alabama Attorney General Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeSessions hits back at Trump days ahead of Alabama Senate runoff The biggest political upsets of the decade State 'certificate of need' laws need to go MORE, who was backed by the state party and President TrumpDonald John TrumpMore than 300 military family members endorse Biden Five takeaways from the final Trump-Biden debate Biden: 'I would transition from the oil industry' MORE.

However, he narrowly lost to Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) in a December special election following a series of allegations from women who accused him of sexual misconduct when they were teens and, in several cases, underage. Moore has denied all the allegations.

“The people of Alabama are smarter than that,” Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerDemocrats seek to block appeal of court ruling ousting Pendley, BLM land plans Senate is leaning to the Democrats, big time, with a wave Cunningham, Tillis locked in tight race in North Carolina: poll MORE (R-Colo.), who is also on the ballot in 2020 and considered one of the most vulnerable Republican senators, told the publication. “They certainly didn’t choose him last time, why would they choose him this time?”

Gardner, the then-chair of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, vowed in 2017 not to seat Moore if he won.

“There will be a lot of efforts made to ensure that we have a nominee other than him and one who can win in November,” Senate Majority Whip John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneGOP power shift emerges with Trump, McConnell GOP coronavirus bill blocked as deal remains elusive Clyburn predicts action on coronavirus relief after elections MORE (R-S.D.) told Politico. “He’s already proven he can’t.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell says 'no concerns' after questions about health Overnight Health Care: Trump says he hopes Supreme Court strikes down ObamaCare | FDA approves remdesivir as COVID-19 treatment | Dems threaten to subpoena HHS over allegations of political interference at CDC The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump, Biden face off for last time on the debate stage MORE (R-Ky.), who implied after the allegations broke in 2017 that he would expel Moore from the Senate, said Thursday he would “oppose him in every way.”

President Trump and his eldest son Donald Trump Jr.Don John TrumpTrump Jr. returning to campaign trail after quarantining Trump Jr., UFC star launch anti-socialism bus tour through South Florida Donald Trump Jr. urges hunters to vote for his father MORE have both also blasted Moore’s decision to run again, with the younger Trump tweeting Thursday that the decision was “doing a disservice to all conservatives.”

McSally testified in March that she was sexually assaulted by a superior officer during her time in the Air Force and has frequently spoken out on the issue.