McSally on Moore running for Senate again: 'This place has enough creepy old men'

Senate Republicans threw cold water on the prospect of another Senate bid by Roy MooreRoy Stewart MooreFormer AG Sessions enters Alabama Senate race Campaign ad casts Sessions as a 'traitor' ahead of expected Senate run Doug Jones on potential challenge from Sessions: Alabama GOP primary will be 'really divisive' MORE, who announced his candidacy Thursday, according to Politico.

“Give me a break. This place has enough creepy old men,” Sen. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyThis week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry Progressive veterans group launches campaign labeling Trump as a 'national security threat' Advocates step up efforts for horse racing reform bill after more deaths MORE (R-Ariz.) told the publication in response to Moore’s announcement.

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Moore won the Republican primary for the seat in 2017, beating former Alabama Attorney General Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeState 'certificate of need' laws need to go GOP frets over nightmare scenario for Senate primaries Roy Moore trails Republican field in Alabama MORE, who was backed by the state party and President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy Official testifies that Bolton had 'one-on-one meeting' with Trump over Ukraine aid Louisiana governor wins re-election MORE.

However, he narrowly lost to Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) in a December special election following a series of allegations from women who accused him of sexual misconduct when they were teens and, in several cases, underage. Moore has denied all the allegations.

“The people of Alabama are smarter than that,” Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerTariffs threaten 1.5M jobs: Study This week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry Progressive veterans group launches campaign labeling Trump as a 'national security threat' MORE (R-Colo.), who is also on the ballot in 2020 and considered one of the most vulnerable Republican senators, told the publication. “They certainly didn’t choose him last time, why would they choose him this time?”

Gardner, the then-chair of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, vowed in 2017 not to seat Moore if he won.

“There will be a lot of efforts made to ensure that we have a nominee other than him and one who can win in November,” Senate Majority Whip John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy Hillicon Valley: Twitter shares more details on political ad rules | Supreme Court takes up Google-Oracle fight | Pentagon chief defends Microsoft cloud contract House, Senate announce agreement on anti-robocall bill MORE (R-S.D.) told Politico. “He’s already proven he can’t.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy On The Money: Trump asks Supreme Court to block Dem subpoena for financial records | Kudlow 'very optimistic' for new NAFTA deal | House passes Ex-Im Bank bill opposed by Trump, McConnell Top House Democrats ask for review of DHS appointments MORE (R-Ky.), who implied after the allegations broke in 2017 that he would expel Moore from the Senate, said Thursday he would “oppose him in every way.”

President Trump and his eldest son Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpResistance or unhinged behavior? Partisan hatred reaches Trump's family George Conway and Trump Jr. trade personal insults during impeachment hearing Trump: 'Everybody knows who the whistleblower is' MORE have both also blasted Moore’s decision to run again, with the younger Trump tweeting Thursday that the decision was “doing a disservice to all conservatives.”

McSally testified in March that she was sexually assaulted by a superior officer during her time in the Air Force and has frequently spoken out on the issue.