McConnell's Democratic challenger says she likely would have voted for Kavanaugh

Amy McGrath, who announced this week she will challenge Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBossie, Lewandowski warned Trump he was in trouble in 2020: report FISA 'reform': Groundhog Day edition The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Major space launch today; Trump feuds with Twitter MORE (R-Ky.) in 2020, said in an interview Wednesday that she would have likely voted to confirm Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughSpeculation swirls about next Supreme Court vacancy The 10 Senate seats most likely to flip Stakes high for Collins in coronavirus relief standoff MORE.

“I was very concerned about Judge Kavanaugh, what I felt like were the far-right stances that he had. However, there was nothing in his record that I think would disqualify him in any way,” McGrath, a former Marine fighter pilot, told the Louisville Courier-Journal.

“And the fact is when you have the president and the Senate, this is our system, and so I don't think there was anything that would have disqualified him in my mind,” she said, adding when pressed on how she would have voted: "yeah, I probably would have voted for him."

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McGrath later flipped her position, tweeting in the evening that "upon further reflection" she would not have voted for Kavanaugh's confirmation.

Kavanaugh’s nomination became a flashpoint after psychology professor and research psychologist Christine Blasey Ford said he sexually assaulted her when both were teenagers, allegations which he denied. Senators eventually voted 50-48 to confirm Kavanaugh, ending a rancorous debate over his nomination.

McGrath told the newspaper that she thought Ford’s allegations were “credible” but “given the amount of time that lapsed in between and from a judicial standpoint, I don't think it would really disqualify him.”

Three Democrats who voted against Kavanaugh’s confirmation — Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillMissouri county issues travel advisory for Lake of the Ozarks after Memorial Day parties Senate faces protracted floor fight over judges amid pandemic safety concerns Amash on eyeing presidential bid: 'Millions of Americans' want someone other than Trump, Biden MORE (Mo.), Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn Heitkamp70 former senators propose bipartisan caucus for incumbents Susan Collins set to play pivotal role in impeachment drama Pro-trade group launches media buy as Trump and Democrats near deal on new NAFTA MORE (N.D.) and Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyEx-Sen. Joe Donnelly endorses Biden Lobbying world 70 former senators propose bipartisan caucus for incumbents MORE (Ind.) — lost their seats in the 2018 midterms.

McConnell has touted his ability to advance President TrumpDonald John TrumpJustice says it will recommend Trump veto FISA bill Fauci: Nominating conventions may be able to go on as planned Poll: Biden leads Trump by 11 points nationally MORE's judicial nominees, including Kavanaugh and Justice Neil GorsuchNeil GorsuchSpeculation swirls about next Supreme Court vacancy Supreme Court denies Trump officials' effort to block order on moving at-risk inmates Juan Williams: Justice Thomas seizes his moment in the Trump era MORE, as one of his biggest accomplishments as he seeks reelection to the upper chamber.

In 2018, when McGrath was running against Rep. Andy BarrAndy Hale BarrHouse GOP to launch China probes beyond COVID-19 Put entrepreneurs, workers and flexibility in next stimulus package McCarthy unveils new GOP-led China task force MORE (R-Ky.) in a House race, she spoke out against Kavanaugh in a Facebook post two months before Ford’s allegations were made public.

“Kavanaugh will likely be confirmed and we are starkly reminded, again, that elections have consequences, and this consequence will be with us for an entire generation,” McGrath said in 2018, although she did not say then whether she would have voted to confirm him.

Updated: July 11 at 10:40 a.m.