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McConnell's Democratic challenger says she likely would have voted for Kavanaugh

Amy McGrath, who announced this week she will challenge Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe bizarre back story of the filibuster The Bible's wisdom about addressing our political tribalism Democrats don't trust GOP on 1/6 commission: 'These people are dangerous' MORE (R-Ky.) in 2020, said in an interview Wednesday that she would have likely voted to confirm Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughMedia circles wagons for conspiracy theorist Neera Tanden The Jan. 6 case for ending the Senate filibuster Laurence Tribe: Justice Thomas is out of order on 2020 election MORE.

“I was very concerned about Judge Kavanaugh, what I felt like were the far-right stances that he had. However, there was nothing in his record that I think would disqualify him in any way,” McGrath, a former Marine fighter pilot, told the Louisville Courier-Journal.

“And the fact is when you have the president and the Senate, this is our system, and so I don't think there was anything that would have disqualified him in my mind,” she said, adding when pressed on how she would have voted: "yeah, I probably would have voted for him."

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McGrath later flipped her position, tweeting in the evening that "upon further reflection" she would not have voted for Kavanaugh's confirmation.

Kavanaugh’s nomination became a flashpoint after psychology professor and research psychologist Christine Blasey Ford said he sexually assaulted her when both were teenagers, allegations which he denied. Senators eventually voted 50-48 to confirm Kavanaugh, ending a rancorous debate over his nomination.

McGrath told the newspaper that she thought Ford’s allegations were “credible” but “given the amount of time that lapsed in between and from a judicial standpoint, I don't think it would really disqualify him.”

Three Democrats who voted against Kavanaugh’s confirmation — Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillThe Memo: Punish Trump or risk a repeat, warn Democrats GOP senators criticized for appearing to pay half-hearted attention to trial Hawley watches trial from visitor's gallery MORE (Mo.), Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampCentrist Democrats pose major problem for progressives Harrison seen as front-runner to take over DNC at crucial moment Biden to tap Vilsack for Agriculture secretary: reports MORE (N.D.) and Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyEverybody wants Joe Manchin Centrist Democrats pose major problem for progressives Biden and Schumer face battles with left if Democrats win big MORE (Ind.) — lost their seats in the 2018 midterms.

McConnell has touted his ability to advance President TrumpDonald TrumpNoem touts South Dakota coronavirus response, knocks lockdowns in CPAC speech On The Trail: Cuomo and Newsom — a story of two embattled governors McCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP takes back lower chamber in 2022 MORE's judicial nominees, including Kavanaugh and Justice Neil GorsuchNeil GorsuchThe Jan. 6 case for ending the Senate filibuster Laurence Tribe: Justice Thomas is out of order on 2020 election McConnell backs Garland for attorney general MORE, as one of his biggest accomplishments as he seeks reelection to the upper chamber.

In 2018, when McGrath was running against Rep. Andy BarrAndy BarrHouse Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Energy issues rule allowing companies to develop own efficiency tests for products | GOP lawmakers push back on Federal Reserve's climate risk efforts GOP lawmakers push back on Federal Reserve's climate risk efforts MORE (R-Ky.) in a House race, she spoke out against Kavanaugh in a Facebook post two months before Ford’s allegations were made public.

“Kavanaugh will likely be confirmed and we are starkly reminded, again, that elections have consequences, and this consequence will be with us for an entire generation,” McGrath said in 2018, although she did not say then whether she would have voted to confirm him.

Updated: July 11 at 10:40 a.m.