McConnell's Democratic challenger says she likely would have voted for Kavanaugh

Amy McGrath, who announced this week she will challenge Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellIn rare move, Schumer forces vote to consider health care bill amid Supreme Court tensions COVID-19 talks hit crucial stretch Supreme Court nominee gives no clues in GOP meeting MORE (R-Ky.) in 2020, said in an interview Wednesday that she would have likely voted to confirm Supreme Court Justice Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughBarrett says Trump offered her Supreme Court nomination three days after Ginsburg death The Hill's 12:30 Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - Judge Amy Coney Barrett makes the rounds on Capitol Hill The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by JobsOhio - Showdown: Trump-Biden debate likely to be nasty MORE.

“I was very concerned about Judge Kavanaugh, what I felt like were the far-right stances that he had. However, there was nothing in his record that I think would disqualify him in any way,” McGrath, a former Marine fighter pilot, told the Louisville Courier-Journal.

“And the fact is when you have the president and the Senate, this is our system, and so I don't think there was anything that would have disqualified him in my mind,” she said, adding when pressed on how she would have voted: "yeah, I probably would have voted for him."

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McGrath later flipped her position, tweeting in the evening that "upon further reflection" she would not have voted for Kavanaugh's confirmation.

Kavanaugh’s nomination became a flashpoint after psychology professor and research psychologist Christine Blasey Ford said he sexually assaulted her when both were teenagers, allegations which he denied. Senators eventually voted 50-48 to confirm Kavanaugh, ending a rancorous debate over his nomination.

McGrath told the newspaper that she thought Ford’s allegations were “credible” but “given the amount of time that lapsed in between and from a judicial standpoint, I don't think it would really disqualify him.”

Three Democrats who voted against Kavanaugh’s confirmation — Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - Judge Amy Coney Barrett makes the rounds on Capitol Hill The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by JobsOhio - Showdown: Trump-Biden debate likely to be nasty Senate Democrats want to avoid Kavanaugh 2.0 MORE (Mo.), Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by JobsOhio - Showdown: Trump-Biden debate likely to be nasty Senate Democrats want to avoid Kavanaugh 2.0 Harris faces pivotal moment with Supreme Court battle MORE (N.D.) and Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by JobsOhio - Showdown: Trump-Biden debate likely to be nasty Senate Democrats want to avoid Kavanaugh 2.0 Trump taps Amy Coney Barrett for Supreme Court, setting up confirmation sprint MORE (Ind.) — lost their seats in the 2018 midterms.

McConnell has touted his ability to advance President TrumpDonald John TrumpFive takeaways from Trump-Biden debate clash The Memo: Debate or debacle? Democrats rip Trump for not condemning white supremacists, Proud Boys at debate MORE's judicial nominees, including Kavanaugh and Justice Neil GorsuchNeil Gorsuch'Long conference' may signal direction of post-Ginsburg court Juan Williams: Trump's Supreme Court power grab Trump suggests Supreme Court nominee would tip panel against Roe v. Wade MORE, as one of his biggest accomplishments as he seeks reelection to the upper chamber.

In 2018, when McGrath was running against Rep. Andy BarrAndy BarrReclaiming the American Dream Powell, Mnuchin stress limits of current emergency lending programs McConnell holds 12-point lead over Democratic challenger McGrath: poll MORE (R-Ky.) in a House race, she spoke out against Kavanaugh in a Facebook post two months before Ford’s allegations were made public.

“Kavanaugh will likely be confirmed and we are starkly reminded, again, that elections have consequences, and this consequence will be with us for an entire generation,” McGrath said in 2018, although she did not say then whether she would have voted to confirm him.

Updated: July 11 at 10:40 a.m.