Tensions flare amid Saudi fight in Senate

Tensions are boiling over in the Senate amid a deep divide over Saudi Arabia and how much pressure to put on the Trump administration to get tough with Riyadh.

The conflict between Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischOvernight Defense: Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators | Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract decision in court | Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families Senate Foreign Relations chair: 'Best' not to pass Turkey sanctions bill 'at this moment' Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators at White House MORE (R-Idaho) and Sen. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezGraham blocks resolution recognizing Armenian genocide after Erdoğan meeting Trump encounters GOP resistance to investigating Hunter Biden Fairness, tradition, and the Constitution demand the 'whistleblower' step forward MORE (N.J.), the panel’s top Democrat, is threatening to sour the committee’s long-standing bipartisan nature, with one aide describing the standoff as “World War III.”

The source of the dispute stems from a decision by the chairman to schedule committee votes for Thursday on two competing measures related to the U.S.-Saudi relationship — one from Risch, the other from Menendez.

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The move sparked backlash from Democrats who argued it violated a deal Menendez and Risch made on how to handle the Saudi legislation. Moving forward without Menendez’s backing would break a long-standing committee tradition of the chairman always securing the ranking member’s support before voting on a bill.

Menendez said he was “deeply concerned” about the fallout if they can’t reach an agreement about how to move forward. He added that he has relayed his concerns to Risch.

“Comity has worked to make the committee, up until now, one of the most bipartisan committees in the Senate, even in the face of the sea of partisanship,” Menendez told The Hill. “So I am deeply concerned about how the committee will operate.”

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyLawmakers spar over upcoming Sondland testimony Johnson: Whistleblower 'exposed things that didn't need to be exposed' Sunday shows — Spotlight shifts to Sondland ahead of impeachment inquiry testimony MORE (D-Conn.) said the Foreign Relations Committee is “unique” because of its bipartisan nature.

“A lot of us would like to see that continue,” he added.

Democrats say Menendez and Risch had agreed that the chairman’s bill would be the base for any Saudi legislation and that Menendez would be able to offer his legislation, which is backed by GOP Sens. Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungTester: Our forefathers would not have tolerated Trump asking Ukraine to investigate Biden The Hill's Morning Report - Fallout from day one of Trump impeachment hearing Overnight Defense: Trump hosts Erdoğan at White House | Says Turkish leader has 'great relationship with the Kurds' | Highlights from first public impeachment hearing MORE (Ind.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy GOP eager for report on alleged FBI surveillance abuse Johnson opens door to subpoenaing whistleblower, Schiff, Bidens MORE (S.C.), as an amendment.

Under the new setup, the committee could end up advancing two bills, with Democrats worrying that Senate GOP leaders will prioritize the Republican measure.

“We’re doing the best we can to work with everybody. Obviously, people have ideas of what they want to do,” Risch said, asked about Democratic complaints about “comity.”

“People can vote for both bills,” Risch said when asked if he would consider merging the bills or dropping one of them.

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Risch has also disputed Menendez’s characterization of their deal, saying he agreed to give his bill a vote, not that it would specifically be as an amendment.

The Menendez bill requires sanctions within 30 days on anyone involved in the murder of Washington Post contributor Jamal Khashoggi, including “any official of the government of Saudi Arabia or member of the royal family” determined to be involved.

The measure also would require a report within 30 days on the kingdom’s human rights record. And to help address the Yemen crisis, the legislation would suspend U.S. weapons sales to Saudi Arabia.

Risch’s bill, which is also backed by Democratic Sens. Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsSenators introduce bipartisan bill restricting police use of facial recognition tech Centrist Democrats seize on state election wins to rail against Warren's agenda Bill Gates visits Capitol to discuss climate change with new Senate caucus MORE (Del.) and Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenOn The Money: US paid record .1B in tariffs in September | Dems ramp up oversight of 'opportunity zones' | Judge hints at letting House lawsuit over Trump tax returns proceed Overnight Energy: EPA watchdog slams agency chief after deputy fails to cooperate in probe | Justices wrestle with reach of Clean Water Act | Bipartisan Senate climate caucus grows Overnight Defense: Trump, Erdogan confirm White House meeting | Public impeachment hearings set for next week | Top defense appropriator retiring MORE (N.H.), would force a “comprehensive review” of the U.S.-Saudi relationship, in addition to denying or revoking visas to members of the Saudi royal family who serve in the Saudi government in positions equivalent to a deputy secretary or agency chief.

Risch argued that his bill is more likely to be signed by President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump reversed course on flavored e-cigarette ban over fear of job losses: report Trump to award National Medal of Arts to actor Jon Voight Sondland notified Trump officials of investigation push ahead of Ukraine call: report MORE.

The Senate has passed resolutions this year to end U.S. support for the Saudi-led military campaign in Yemen and block an arms deal. Trump vetoed the Yemen resolution and the resolutions blocking his arms deal.

“I’ve spent a long time talking with the president about this, I mean a long time. I know what … we can pass that will become part of the foreign policy of the United States and what can’t pass,” Risch said.

But with a majority supporting the Menendez-Young bill, Democrats were expected to try to muscle through tougher Saudi legislation. Murphy acknowledged the tensions between Risch and Menendez but questioned if it would impact the outcome of Thursday's meeting.

“I don’t know that that changes the outcome because you can’t stop members from offering amendments,” Murphy said. “There’s a bipartisan majority in the committee to report out a bill that’s stronger than Sen. Risch’s bill.”

Menendez, Risch and their staffs have been locked in talks this week to try to find an offramp for a showdown on Thursday. The two committee leaders were also spotted having an intense discussion on the Senate floor Tuesday.

Menendez on Wednesday said they are “closer” to an agreement but “not there yet.” Risch said they have had “lots of conversations” and that talks were expected to continue ahead of Thursday’s meeting to try to get a deal.

The fallout over Saudi Arabia comes as members of the panel are also sparring over high-profile Trump nominees, including Kelly Craft, the president’s nominee to be the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Craft’s nomination is also on Thursday’s agenda.

“The committee has largely tried to operate where the agenda is always set by an agreement between the ranking member and chairman, and Sen. Risch has tried to keep to that agreement. But the challenge really becomes when you start getting a backlog on ambassador nominees ... and you can’t get any movement on them,” said Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioGOP senators plan to tune out impeachment week Republicans warn election results are 'wake-up call' for Trump Paul's demand to out whistleblower rankles GOP colleagues MORE (R-Fla.).

He added that there were “some tensions on the details of the Saudi bills as well.” 

In retaliation for Risch moving forward without their signoff, Democrats have filed roughly 400 amendments to legislation that’s on the agenda. Most of those amendments, according to a Democratic aide, are for the two Saudi bills.

Menendez vowed that without an agreement to de-escalate tensions with Risch and restore “comity,” Democrats would force the panel to vote on each of the amendments “as long as is necessary.”

Asked about the tensions between Menendez and Risch and how it would play out Thursday, Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineOvernight Health Care: Trump officials making changes to drug pricing proposal | House panel advances flavored e-cig ban | Senators press FDA tobacco chief on vaping ban Senators press FDA tobacco chief on status of vaping ban Progressive freshmen jump into leadership PAC fundraising MORE (D-Va.) indicated it hadn’t been worked out yet. 

“I don’t think it’s quite resolved yet,” he said. “So you’ve got to buy your ticket and come and see what happens.”