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Romney to vote against budget deal: Agreement 'perpetuates fiscal recklessness'

Romney to vote against budget deal: Agreement 'perpetuates fiscal recklessness'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyChina's genocide must be stopped How Biden can get the infrastructure bill through Congress The Hill's 12:30 Report: Sights and sounds from Biden's European trip MORE (R-Utah) announced Thursday he intends to vote against a budget deal the White House struck with House Democrats earlier this week as conservatives continue to express concerns over increases to the national debt. 

“Utah balances its budget every year, and while it may not be in fashion in Washington, we still care deeply about fiscal responsibility. The federal government, however, has followed a very different course, and our national debt now totals over $22 trillion,” Romney said in a statement to The Hill. 

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“This deal unfortunately perpetuates fiscal recklessness by adding another $2 trillion to the debt, and I cannot support it. We must repair our fiscal foundation and set a course to a balanced budget now so that we avoid a future debt crisis that would pose grave hardships for our children and grandchildren.”

Romney joins Sens. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonSenate passes bill to make Juneteenth a federal holiday Jon Stewart: Coronavirus 'more than likely caused by science' Hillicon Valley: House targets tech giants with antitrust bills | Oversight chair presses JBS over payment to hackers | Trump spokesman to join tech company | YouTube suspends GOP senator MORE (R-Wis.), Mike BraunMichael BraunIU parents protest school's vaccine mandates Rick Scott introduces bill banning 'vaccine passports' for domestic flights Braun-McConnell bill would protect Americans from IRS surveillance MORE (R-Ind.), James LankfordJames Paul LankfordSenate passes resolution condemning recent rise in antisemitic attacks Police reform negotiations enter crucial stretch GOP turns against Jan. 6 probe as midterm distraction MORE (R-Okla.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeBig Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC GOP senators press Justice Department to compare protest arrests to Capitol riot Matt Stoller says cheerleading industry shows why antitrust laws are 'insufficient' MORE (R-Utah) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRand Paul does not support a national minimum wage increase — and it's important to understand why Fauci to Chelsea Clinton: The 'phenomenal amount of hostility' I face is 'astounding' GOP's attacks on Fauci at center of pandemic message MORE (R-Ky.) in opposing the deal. Other Republicans, including Sens. Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyHillicon Valley: Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC | Lawmakers urge Biden to be tough on cyber during summit with Putin | TSA working on additional security regulations following Colonial Pipeline hack Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC Rick Scott urges NBC to demand Winter Olympics be moved from China over human rights abuses  MORE (Mo.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioPast criticism of Trump becomes potent weapon in GOP primaries Lawmakers urge Biden to be tough on cybersecurity during summit with Putin Five years after the Pulse nightclub massacre the fight for LGBTQ+ rights continues MORE (Fla.) and John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.), are still undecided. 

President TrumpDonald TrumpKushner lands book deal, slated for release in 2022 Biden moves to undo Trump trade legacy with EU deal Progressives rave over Harrison's start at DNC MORE and Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocrat says he won't introduce resolution to censure Greene after her apology Democrats weigh next steps on Jan. 6 probe 21 Republicans vote against awarding medals to police who defended Capitol on Jan. 6 MORE (D-Calif.) reached a two-year budget deal on Monday that also suspends the debt ceiling through July 2021. The agreement sets the top-line numbers for overall defense and nondefense spending at $738 billion and $632 billion for fiscal 2020 and $740 billion and $634.5 billion for fiscal 2021.

Trump has urged Congress to pass the agreement as fiscal hawks in both chambers of Congress express concerns over estimates that the deal could add trillions to deficits over a decade. 

“Our credit card is maxed out,” Rep. Mark WalkerBradley (Mark) Mark WalkerPast criticism of Trump becomes potent weapon in GOP primaries Trump endorsement shakes up GOP Senate primary in NC Trump endorses Rep. Ted Budd for Senate in North Carolina MORE (R-N.C.), a member of House leadership, tweeted this week. “What this budget deal does is ask the credit card company for another $320 billion in credit NOW for the chance to get paid back $75 billion in a decade. No bank would take that. American taxpayers shouldn’t either.” 

The House Freedom Caucus, a conservative group of Republicans that includes some of Trump’s staunchest allies, also came out in opposition to the budget deal this week, calling it “a $323 billion spending frenzy with no serious offsets.”

However, the agreement has support from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Schumer to trigger reconciliation process on Wednesday | Four states emerge as test case for cutting off jobless benefits GOP senator: I want to make Biden a 'one-half-term president' McConnell presses for 'actual consequences' in disclosure of tax data MORE (R-Ky.) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyHouse fails to pass bill to promote credit fairness for LGTBQ-owned businesses Democrats weigh next steps on Jan. 6 probe McCarthy pushes back on Biden criticism of GOP at NATO MORE (R-Calif.), who have expressed confidence that the deal is the best the White House could have been reached with Pelosi.