Romney to vote against budget deal: Agreement 'perpetuates fiscal recklessness'

Romney to vote against budget deal: Agreement 'perpetuates fiscal recklessness'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneySenate gears up for battle over witnesses in impeachment trial McConnell: I doubt any GOP senator will vote to impeach Trump Trump hosts pastor who says 'Jews are going to hell' at White House Hanukkah party MORE (R-Utah) announced Thursday he intends to vote against a budget deal the White House struck with House Democrats earlier this week as conservatives continue to express concerns over increases to the national debt. 

“Utah balances its budget every year, and while it may not be in fashion in Washington, we still care deeply about fiscal responsibility. The federal government, however, has followed a very different course, and our national debt now totals over $22 trillion,” Romney said in a statement to The Hill. 

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“This deal unfortunately perpetuates fiscal recklessness by adding another $2 trillion to the debt, and I cannot support it. We must repair our fiscal foundation and set a course to a balanced budget now so that we avoid a future debt crisis that would pose grave hardships for our children and grandchildren.”

Romney joins Sens. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonHillicon Valley: Twitter to start verifying 2020 primary candidates | FTC reportedly weighs injunction over Facebook apps | Bill would give DHS cyber unit subpoena powers | FCC moves to designate 988 as suicide-prevention hotline Senate Republicans air complaints to Trump administration on trade deal Senate bill would give DHS cyber agency subpoena powers MORE (R-Wis.), Mike BraunMichael BraunRepublicans consider skipping witnesses in Trump impeachment trial College Republicans launch campaign calling for GOP to take action on climate change Senate braces for brawl on Trump impeachment rules MORE (R-Ind.), James LankfordJames Paul LankfordThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Lankford to be named next Senate Ethics chairman Trump to sign order penalizing colleges over perceived anti-Semitism on campus: report MORE (R-Okla.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenators zero in on shadowy court at center of IG report The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Five takeaways on Horowitz's testimony on Capitol Hill MORE (R-Utah) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulPentagon to take bigger role in vetting foreign students after Pensacola shooting Overnight Defense: House passes compromise defense bill | Turkey sanctions advance in Senate over Trump objections | Top general says military won't be 'raping, burning and pillaging' after Trump pardons Rand Paul: 'We need to re-examine' US-Saudi relationship after Florida shooting MORE (R-Ky.) in opposing the deal. Other Republicans, including Sens. Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleySenate Republicans air complaints to Trump administration on trade deal Hillicon Valley: Pentagon pushes back on Amazon lawsuit | Lawmakers dismiss Chinese threat to US tech companies | YouTube unveils new anti-harassment policy | Agencies get annual IT grades Lawmakers dismiss Chinese retaliatory threat to US tech MORE (Mo.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioWhite House makes push for paid family leave and child care reform Tom Hanks weighs in on primary: 'Anybody can become president' GOP senator blocks bill aimed at preventing Russia election meddling MORE (Fla.) and John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.), are still undecided. 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate gears up for battle over witnesses in impeachment trial Vulnerable Democrats tout legislative wins, not impeachment Trump appears to set personal record for tweets in a day MORE and Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiVulnerable Democrats tout legislative wins, not impeachment Photographer leaves Judiciary hearing after being accused of taking photos of member notes Overnight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — House passes sweeping Pelosi bill to lower drug prices | Senate confirms Trump FDA pick | Trump officials approve Medicaid work requirements in South Carolina MORE (D-Calif.) reached a two-year budget deal on Monday that also suspends the debt ceiling through July 2021. The agreement sets the top-line numbers for overall defense and nondefense spending at $738 billion and $632 billion for fiscal 2020 and $740 billion and $634.5 billion for fiscal 2021.

Trump has urged Congress to pass the agreement as fiscal hawks in both chambers of Congress express concerns over estimates that the deal could add trillions to deficits over a decade. 

“Our credit card is maxed out,” Rep. Mark WalkerBradley (Mark) Mark WalkerThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democrats worry about diversity on next debate stage North Carolina congressman says he won't seek reelection after redistricting NC rep explores Tillis primary challenge MORE (R-N.C.), a member of House leadership, tweeted this week. “What this budget deal does is ask the credit card company for another $320 billion in credit NOW for the chance to get paid back $75 billion in a decade. No bank would take that. American taxpayers shouldn’t either.” 

The House Freedom Caucus, a conservative group of Republicans that includes some of Trump’s staunchest allies, also came out in opposition to the budget deal this week, calling it “a $323 billion spending frenzy with no serious offsets.”

However, the agreement has support from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate gears up for battle over witnesses in impeachment trial McConnell: I doubt any GOP senator will vote to impeach Trump McConnell says he'll be in 'total coordination' with White House on impeachment trial strategy MORE (R-Ky.) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyHouse passes sweeping Pelosi bill to lower drug prices CEO group pushes Trump, Congress on paid family, medical leave The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by UANI — Sparks fly as House Judiciary debates impeachment articles MORE (R-Calif.), who have expressed confidence that the deal is the best the White House could have been reached with Pelosi.