Romney to vote against budget deal: Agreement 'perpetuates fiscal recklessness'

Romney to vote against budget deal: Agreement 'perpetuates fiscal recklessness'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyDemocrats fear Ohio slipping further away in 2020 Poll shows Michelle Obama would lead in New Hampshire if she entered 2020 Democratic race Trump's GOP impeachment firewall holds strong MORE (R-Utah) announced Thursday he intends to vote against a budget deal the White House struck with House Democrats earlier this week as conservatives continue to express concerns over increases to the national debt. 

“Utah balances its budget every year, and while it may not be in fashion in Washington, we still care deeply about fiscal responsibility. The federal government, however, has followed a very different course, and our national debt now totals over $22 trillion,” Romney said in a statement to The Hill. 

“This deal unfortunately perpetuates fiscal recklessness by adding another $2 trillion to the debt, and I cannot support it. We must repair our fiscal foundation and set a course to a balanced budget now so that we avoid a future debt crisis that would pose grave hardships for our children and grandchildren.”

Romney joins Sens. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold Johnson10 top Republicans who continue to deny the undeniable GOP braces for impeachment brawl Bipartisan senators want federal plan for sharing more info on supply chain threats MORE (R-Wis.), Mike BraunMichael BraunHillicon Valley: Senate Intel report urges action to prevent 2020 Russian meddling | Republicans warn Microsoft of 'urgent' Huawei threat | Court rules FBI surveillance violated Americans' rights GOP senators warn Microsoft of 'urgent' threat from Huawei Senate passes stopgap spending bill, sending it to Trump MORE (R-Ind.), James LankfordJames Paul LankfordMcConnell support for election security funds leaves Dems declaring victory Election security funds passed by Senate seen as welcome first step Senate committee approves 0 million for state election security efforts MORE (R-Okla.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeA decade of policymaking failures is to blame for new Syria crisis Zuckerberg defends meetings with conservative politicians, pundits GOP requests update on criminal referrals prompted by 2018 Kavanaugh probe MORE (R-Utah) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulCNN catches heat for asking candidates about Ellen, Bush friendship at debate Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Trump isolated amid Syria furor | Pompeo, Pence to visit Turkey in push for ceasefire | Turkish troops advance in Syria | Graham throws support behind Trump's sanctions Rand Paul rips Lindsey Graham: 'Wrong about almost every foreign policy decision' MORE (R-Ky.) in opposing the deal. Other Republicans, including Sens. Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyHong Kong dismisses concessions as protests escalate The Hill's Morning Report - Trump grapples with Turkey controversy This week: Congress returns to chaotic Washington MORE (Mo.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioHillicon Valley: Warren turns up heat in battle with Facebook | Instagram unveils new data privacy feature | Advocacy group seeks funding to write about Big Tech TikTok adds former lawmakers to help develop content moderation policies This week: Congress returns to chaotic Washington MORE (Fla.) and John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.), are still undecided. 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpWarren defends, Buttigieg attacks in debate that shrank the field Five takeaways from the Democratic debate in Ohio Democrats debate in Ohio: Who came out on top? MORE and Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump-GOP tensions over Syria show signs of easing Democratic debate starts with immediate question on Trump impeachment White House, Pentagon, Giuliani reject House subpoenas MORE (D-Calif.) reached a two-year budget deal on Monday that also suspends the debt ceiling through July 2021. The agreement sets the top-line numbers for overall defense and nondefense spending at $738 billion and $632 billion for fiscal 2020 and $740 billion and $634.5 billion for fiscal 2021.

Trump has urged Congress to pass the agreement as fiscal hawks in both chambers of Congress express concerns over estimates that the deal could add trillions to deficits over a decade. 

“Our credit card is maxed out,” Rep. Mark WalkerBradley (Mark) Mark WalkerCalifornia inspires other states to push to pay college athletes To boost minority serving institutions, bipartisan Future Act needs immediate action Pressure rises on Cheney to make decision MORE (R-N.C.), a member of House leadership, tweeted this week. “What this budget deal does is ask the credit card company for another $320 billion in credit NOW for the chance to get paid back $75 billion in a decade. No bank would take that. American taxpayers shouldn’t either.” 

The House Freedom Caucus, a conservative group of Republicans that includes some of Trump’s staunchest allies, also came out in opposition to the budget deal this week, calling it “a $323 billion spending frenzy with no serious offsets.”

However, the agreement has support from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump-GOP tensions over Syria show signs of easing Trump again vetoes resolution blocking national emergency for border wall Trump invites congressional leaders to meeting on Turkey MORE (R-Ky.) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthy10 top Republicans who continue to deny the undeniable Furious Republicans prepare to rebuke Trump on Syria Five ways Trump's Syria decision spells trouble MORE (R-Calif.), who have expressed confidence that the deal is the best the White House could have been reached with Pelosi.