Democrats introduce constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United

Senate Democrats introduced a constitutional amendment on Tuesday to undo the 2010 Citizens United Supreme Court decision. 
 
 
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"Few decisions in the 200 and some odd years of this republic have threatened our democracy like Citizens United. People say they want to get rid of the swamp. Citizens United is the embodiment of the swamp," Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTrump defends 'crime buster' Giuliani amid reported probe Louisiana voters head to the polls in governor's race as Trump urges GOP support Trump urges Louisiana voters to back GOP in governor's race then 'enjoy the game' MORE (D-N.Y.) said at the rally. 
 
Schumer added that "overturning Citizens United is probably more important than any other single thing we could do to preserve this great and grand democracy." 
 
Democrats pledged that if they took control of the Senate during the 2020 election, they would bring legislation overturning Citizens United up for a vote. 
 
"We reported this amendment to the floor [in 2014]. What happened to it? A [Senate Majority Leader Mitch] McConnell [R-Ky.] filibuster happened to it. ... With a new leader by the name of Schumer in the Senate, we can be sure that it won't be a filibuster stopping us," said Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinSenators take fundraising efforts to Nats playoff games Overnight Health Care: Watchdog finds DEA allowed more opioids even as overdose deaths rose | Judge temporarily blocks Georgia abortion law | Three states report more vaping deaths | Dem proposes new fix for surprise medical bills During impeachment storm, senators cross aisle to lessen mass incarceration MORE (D-Ill.), the No. 2 Senate Democrat. 
 
The 2010 Supreme Court ruling prohibited the government from limiting spending by companies, nonprofit organizations and unions on political campaign advertisements. The court's majority wrote that such provisions would inhibit freedom of speech.
 
The Senate Democratic amendment would let Congress and states set rules on spending and money in elections. 
 
But to be added as an amendment to the Constitution, the Democratic proposal would need to be approved by two-thirds of both the House and Senate and be approved by three-fourths of the states. 
 
Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffTrump hits Fox News's Chris Wallace over Ukraine coverage Schiff: Whistleblower testimony might not be necessary A Republican Watergate veteran's perspective on a Trump impeachment MORE (D-Calif.) introduced his own amendment to nix Citizens United in May. 
 
"The Supreme Court's decision in Citizens United overturned decades of legal precedent and has enabled billions in dark money to pour into our elections," Schiff said in a statement.