Democrats introduce constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United

Senate Democrats introduced a constitutional amendment on Tuesday to undo the 2010 Citizens United Supreme Court decision. 
 
A group of Democrats, led by Sen. Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallKey races to watch in Tuesday's primaries DHS watchdog to investigate COVID-19 cases in ICE detention facilities Hispanic Caucus makes major ad buy for New Mexico Democratic candidate for House MORE (D-N.M.), and progressive activists rallied outside the Supreme Court to unveil the amendment, which faces an unlikely path to being ratified. 
 
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"Few decisions in the 200 and some odd years of this republic have threatened our democracy like Citizens United. People say they want to get rid of the swamp. Citizens United is the embodiment of the swamp," Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerJudd Gregg: Biden — a path to the presidency, or not Montana barrels toward blockbuster Senate fight Federal judges should be allowed to be Federalist Society members MORE (D-N.Y.) said at the rally. 
 
Schumer added that "overturning Citizens United is probably more important than any other single thing we could do to preserve this great and grand democracy." 
 
Democrats pledged that if they took control of the Senate during the 2020 election, they would bring legislation overturning Citizens United up for a vote. 
 
"We reported this amendment to the floor [in 2014]. What happened to it? A [Senate Majority Leader Mitch] McConnell [R-Ky.] filibuster happened to it. ... With a new leader by the name of Schumer in the Senate, we can be sure that it won't be a filibuster stopping us," said Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinFrustration builds in key committee ahead of Graham subpoena vote  Senate Democrat introduces bill to protect food supply Democratic unity starts to crack in coronavirus liability reform fight MORE (D-Ill.), the No. 2 Senate Democrat. 
 
The 2010 Supreme Court ruling prohibited the government from limiting spending by companies, nonprofit organizations and unions on political campaign advertisements. The court's majority wrote that such provisions would inhibit freedom of speech.
 
The Senate Democratic amendment would let Congress and states set rules on spending and money in elections. 
 
But to be added as an amendment to the Constitution, the Democratic proposal would need to be approved by two-thirds of both the House and Senate and be approved by three-fourths of the states. 
 
Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffFlynn urged Russian diplomat to have 'reciprocal' response to Obama sanctions, new transcripts show The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation Hillicon Valley: Trump signs order targeting social media legal protections | House requests conference with Senate after FISA vote canceled | Minneapolis systems temporarily brought down by hackers MORE (D-Calif.) introduced his own amendment to nix Citizens United in May. 
 
"The Supreme Court's decision in Citizens United overturned decades of legal precedent and has enabled billions in dark money to pour into our elections," Schiff said in a statement.