Sherrod Brown: Congress can't combat mass shootings due to McConnell and Trump being 'in bed with the gun lobby'

Sherrod Brown: Congress can't combat mass shootings due to McConnell and Trump being 'in bed with the gun lobby'
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Ohio Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownDayton Democrat launches challenge to longtime GOP rep Dayton mayor: Trump visit after shooting was 'difficult on the community' Consoler in Chief like Biden is the perfect antidote to a Divider in Chief like Trump MORE (D) on Wednesday said the inability to find a solution to mass shootings is due to President TrumpDonald John TrumpWarren unveils Native American policy plan Live-action 'Mulan' star spurs calls for boycott with support of Hong Kong police Don't let other countries unfairly tax America's most innovative companies MORE and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSocial media never intended to be in the news business — but just wait till AI takes over Ex-CIA chief worries campaigns falling short on cybersecurity Two-thirds of Americans support assault weapons ban: Fox News poll MORE (R-Ky.) being "in bed with the gun lobby."

Asked during a press conference if both parties take blame for not being able to find a solution, Brown shot back, "No."

"Republicans for years now have dug in and done the bidding of the NRA. The National Rifle Association, the gun lobby, gives millions of dollars to Republican candidates and spends millions and millions against Democrats like me that have stood up to the NRA," Brown said while speaking alongside Dayton, Ohio, Mayor Nan Whaley (D).

"We can’t get anything done in the Senate because Mitch McConnell and the president of the United States are in bed with the gun lobby," he added.

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Brown made the comments after he met with President Trump during his visit to Dayton to meet with first responders and survivors of a mass shooting in the city that left nine people dead.

The incident occurred the same weekend a mass shooting in El Paso, Texas, left at least 23 people dead. 

Brown acknowledged that there are a lot of things Congress can do to combat mass shootings but emphasized that guns are a "big, big part."

"Certainly, mental health services matter, but the same people that say, 'It’s mental health. It’s not too many guns on the street' are the same people that try to cut Medicaid and the same people that try to repeal the Affordable Care Act," Brown argued. "Be honest about this. Guns is a big, big part of this."

Brown stated during the press conference that he had told Trump to tell McConnell to bring the Senate back into session for a vote on gun legislation. 

That same day, more than 200 Democratic House lawmakers sent a letter to McConnell urging a vote on House-passed legislation aimed at strengthening background checks for gun purchases.

Trump indicated that he's “all in favor” of background checks. But he added that he didn't believe there would be a strong movement to enforce legislation banning high-powered weapons such as the one used in the attack in Dayton.

Trump is meeting with first responders and shooting survivors in Dayton and El Paso on Wednesday.