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Schumer joins Pelosi in opposition to post-Brexit trade deal that risks Northern Ireland accord

Schumer joins Pelosi in opposition to post-Brexit trade deal that risks Northern Ireland accord
© Aaron Schwartz

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerIt's not just Manchin: No electoral mandate stalls Democrats' leftist agenda DOJ to probe Trump-era subpoenas of lawmaker records Democrats demand Barr, Sessions testify on Apple data subpoenas MORE (D-N.Y.) on Monday vowed to oppose any post-Brexit trade deal with the United Kingdom that would risk Northern Ireland's peaceful status quo with Ireland.

In a letter to Secretary of State Mike PompeoMike PompeoSunday shows preview: Biden foreign policy in focus as Dem tensions boil up back home Sunday shows preview: Infrastructure expected to dominate as talks continue to drag The triumph and tragedy of 1989: Why Tiananmen still matters MORE, Schumer praised the Good Friday Agreement between Ireland and the U.K. as a "towering achievement of diplomacy and it planted the seeds of a society based on mutual respect and equality, rather than one based on distrust and discrimination."

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The agreement, which created a free and demilitarized border between Ireland and Northern Ireland in 1998, ended the then-decades long Northern Ireland conflict.

Despite successfully maintaining the peace for more than two decades, the agreement is now threatened by the prospect of a British withdrawal from the European Union without a deal.

Exiting that way would likely require imposing a hard border between Northern Ireland and Ireland.

Schumer joins Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiNew Alzheimer's drug sparks backlash over FDA, pricing Sunday shows preview: Biden foreign policy in focus as Dem tensions boil up back home It's not just Manchin: No electoral mandate stalls Democrats' leftist agenda MORE (D-Calif.) in opposing any U.S.-U.K. trade deal that would threaten the Good Friday Agreement.

"In this, I stand shoulder-to-shoulder with the bi-partisan, bi-cameral supporters of the Good Friday Agreement (and opponents of a return to a hard border), especially including Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and will do all in my power to work in a bi-partisan way to prevent such pact from receiving the approval of Congress," the New York Democrat said Monday.

Any new trade deal to substitute the U.S.-U.K. agreements negotiated through the EU would have to be brought to a vote in Congress, meaning the Speaker could block it.

Members of the Trump administration and Republican lawmakers have backed a new trade deal regardless of whether a hard border has to be imposed.

National security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonJohn Bolton: Biden-Putin meeting 'premature' Republicans request documents on Kerry's security clearance process Trump pushes back on Bolton poll MORE said earlier this month that the U.S. would support a "no deal" Brexit, which would likely trigger the hard border. Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyHouse unveils antitrust package to rein in tech giants Iowa governor questions lack of notice on migrant children flights to Des Moines Senate crafts Pelosi alternative on drug prices MORE (R-Iowa) also recently said he would support a no-deal exit.

New British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has promised an exit from the EU by Oct. 31, but faces several roadblocks to negotiating a new deal.