Senate again votes to end Trump emergency declaration on border wall

The Senate again voted on Wednesday to end President TrumpDonald John TrumpGraham to introduce resolution condemning House impeachment inquiry Support for impeachment inches up in poll Fox News's Bret Baier calls Trump's attacks on media 'a problem' MORE’s emergency declaration on the U.S.-Mexico border wall, paving the way for a veto showdown with the White House.

Senators voted 54-41 on a resolution to end the declaration, which Trump used to shift billions of dollars from the military toward wall construction.

Under the National Emergencies Act, a resolution ending the declaration needed only a simple majority to clear the Senate, making it likely to be approved. But underscoring the broad swath of concern about Trump’s actions among the Senate GOP caucus, 11 Republican senators voted to nix the declaration.

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GOP Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderGOP braces for impeachment brawl McConnell tightlipped as impeachment furor grows GOP senator: 'Inappropriate' to discuss opponents, but impeachment a 'mistake' MORE (Tenn.), Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntSenate GOP braces for impeachment trial 'roller coaster' Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe On The Money: Senate fails to override Trump veto over border emergency | Trump resort to host G-7 next year | Senators to push Turkey sanctions despite ceasefire | McConnell tees up funding votes MORE (Mo.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsCNN: Biden likened Clinton impeachment to 'partisan lynching' in 1998 The Memo: Trump 'lynching' firestorm is sign of things to come Susan Collins calls on Trump to retract tweet comparing impeachment inquiry to 'lynching' MORE (Maine), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenate votes for North Macedonia to join NATO Zuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe MORE (Utah), Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranMcConnell signaling Trump trial to be quick, if it happens Overnight Defense — Presented by Huntington Ingalls Industries — Furor over White House readout of Ukraine call | Dems seize on memo in impeachment push | Senate votes to end Trump emergency | Congress gets briefing on Iran Senate again votes to end Trump emergency declaration on border wall MORE (Kan.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiMulvaney defends decision to host G-7 at Doral: Trump 'considers himself to be in the hospitality business' Trump says his Doral resort will no longer host G-7 after backlash Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe MORE (Alaska), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate Democrats to hold caucus meeting Wednesday with ex-ISIS envoy Partisan squabbles endanger congressional response to Trump's course on Syria Paul blocks vote on House-passed Syria resolution for second time MORE (Ky.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanRural broadband in jeopardy unless Congress fixes taxing problem Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe On The Money: Senate fails to override Trump veto over border emergency | Trump resort to host G-7 next year | Senators to push Turkey sanctions despite ceasefire | McConnell tees up funding votes MORE (Ohio), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyOvernight Defense: Trump's Syria envoy wasn't consulted on withdrawal | McConnell offers resolution urging Trump to rethink Syria | Diplomat says Ukraine aid was tied to political investigations Trump's Syria envoy says he wasn't consulted on troop withdrawal Trump 'lynching' comparison draws backlash from lawmakers MORE (Utah), Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyNSA improperly collected US phone records in October, new documents show Overnight Defense: Pick for South Korean envoy splits with Trump on nuclear threat | McCain blasts move to suspend Korean military exercises | White House defends Trump salute of North Korean general WH backpedals on Trump's 'due process' remark on guns MORE (Pa.) and Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerHillicon Valley: Zuckerberg defends handling of misinformation in political ads | Biden camp hits Zuckerberg over remarks | Dem bill would jail tech execs for lying about privacy | Consumer safety agency accidentally disclosed personal data Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe On The Money: Senate fails to override Trump veto over border emergency | Trump resort to host G-7 next year | Senators to push Turkey sanctions despite ceasefire | McConnell tees up funding votes MORE (Miss.) voted to end the president's declaration. 

The vote marks another setback for Trump in the midst of a chaotic week on Capitol Hill. The White House is locked in a burgeoning impeachment battle with Democrats and lawmakers still need to fund the government before Monday to prevent the second shutdown of the year.

Democrats have seized on the administration’s decision to shift money away from military construction projects as a way to politically box in Republicans by forcing them to decide between breaking with Trump or voting to allow money to be shifted away from projects in their own states.

“The vote today is the surest and likely the only way to restore funding the president has stolen from our troops and military projects across the country,” Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTurkey says soldier killed despite cease-fire in Syria Schumer calls for FDA to probe reports of contaminated baby food How Trump and Pelosi went from bad to worse MORE (D-N.Y.) said ahead of the vote.

He added that if Republicans voted to uphold Trump’s use of his emergency powers they would be setting "a dangerous precedent that could embolden not just this president but future presidents to ignore congressional authority.”

Trump’s decision to leapfrog Congress and declare a national emergency came after lawmakers passed a government funding bill that included $1.375 billion for border barriers.

But the decision has become a perennial headache for the GOP. Under the National Emergencies Act, Democrats can force a vote on ending Trump’s emergency declaration every six months. The Senate previously voted to end it in February, with 12 Republicans voting with Democrats, but the House was unable to override a veto.

“It’s a vote the Democrats can insist on. I’m pretty sure there’s no Republican insisting on taking that vote again,” said Blunt, a member of GOP leadership, referring to the second vote.

Under a list circulated by the Pentagon, officials are shifting money away from military construction projects in 14 states that have Republican senators to go instead toward the border wall.

Some of those states will be at the heart of the 2020 battle for control of the Senate, including Arizona, Colorado and North Carolina, where GOP Sens. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyPublisher announces McSally book planned for May release Singer Brandi Carlile drops out of Fortune event over Kirstjen Nielsen's appearance The Hill's Morning Report - Dem debate contenders take aim at Warren MORE (Ariz.), Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerTrump donor hosting Romney fundraiser Bennet reintroduces bill to ban lawmakers from becoming lobbyists GOP warns Graham letter to Pelosi on impeachment could 'backfire' MORE (Colo.) and Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisCash surge puts more Senate races in play Tillis says impeachment is 'a waste of resources' GOP requests update on criminal referrals prompted by 2018 Kavanaugh probe MORE (N.C.) are on the ballot.

Democrats also trolled Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGraham to introduce resolution condemning House impeachment inquiry Overnight Defense: Trump's Syria envoy wasn't consulted on withdrawal | McConnell offers resolution urging Trump to rethink Syria | Diplomat says Ukraine aid was tied to political investigations Partisan squabbles endanger congressional response to Trump's course on Syria MORE (R-Ky.) on Tuesday, holding a press conference with a former educator from Fort Campbell Middle School in Kentucky, which lost $62 million under the emergency declaration.

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McConnell knocked Democrats on Wednesday, arguing they were forcing them to hold a repeat vote even though they knew the outcome — that Congress won’t be able to override a veto.

“Still unwilling to work with the president and Republicans on a long-term bipartisan solution for border security, Senate Democrats are making us repeat the same show vote again. I would urge my colleagues to vote for border security and vote against Democrats’ resolution,” he said.

Republicans who support ending the emergency declaration argue that their decision isn’t about Trump personally but about broader concerns on upholding the separation of powers.

“Let me be clear: The question before us is not whether to support or oppose the wall, or to support or oppose the President. Rather, it is: Do we want the Executive Branch — now or in the future — to hold a power that the Founders deliberately entrusted to Congress?” GOP Sen. Susan Collins (Maine), a co-sponsor of the resolution, asked earlier this month.

But Republicans would also likely have sparked fierce backlash from their party’s base if they broke with Trump on the wall, an issue that fires up the president’s core group of supporters.

They are hoping to backfill the $3.6 billion being diverted to the border as part of the fiscal 2020 funding bills.

Democrats, however, have pledged to block any effort to replace the money. The Senate has also struggled to get its funding bills off the ground. The military construction and Veterans Affairs bill, which would include the backfilled funds, hasn’t yet been brought up in the Senate Appropriations Committee.

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynThune calls Trump remarks on lynching 'inappropriate' Cash surge puts more Senate races in play Trump slams 'very dumb' O'Rourke for proposals on guns, tax exempt status for churches MORE (R-Texas), who is up for reelection, said he would vote to uphold the emergency declaration even though it is resulting in military projects in his state losing money.

“Same way I voted last time. How would I square voting differently?” Cornyn asked.

When a reporter noted his state was losing money according to the Pentagon list, he added: “that’s way too parochial.”

Spokespeople for McSally and Tillis also confirmed ahead of the vote that they would also support the emergency declaration.

“Senator Tillis will once again be supporting President Trump’s emergency declaration because Democrats refuse to provide the president with the tools and resources he needs to address the crisis at our southern border and keep America safe,” said a spokesperson for Tillis.

Democrats urged additional Republicans to support the resolution, but were also realistic about their chances of picking up more GOP votes. Critically for Trump, Republicans were able to keep the vote total below 67, the amount needed to override a veto.

“I do remember what happened with one senator who actually put out a column … saying he was going to vote against this extension of presidential power, 48 hours later he reversed himself,” Durbin said, referring to Tillis. “I don’t know what pressure these Republican senators face … in questioning the president.”