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Here are the Senate Democrats backing a Trump impeachment inquiry over Ukraine call

Here are the Senate Democrats backing a Trump impeachment inquiry over Ukraine call
© Greg Nash

Details of President TrumpDonald John TrumpMore than 300 military family members endorse Biden Five takeaways from the final Trump-Biden debate Biden: 'I would transition from the oil industry' MORE's phone conversation with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, in which he pressed for an investigation into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenMore than 300 military family members endorse Biden Five takeaways from the final Trump-Biden debate Biden: 'I would transition from the oil industry' MORE, have led to a flurry of calls for an impeachment inquiry.

Much of that activity has taken place in the House, where Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump predicts GOP will win the House Hillicon Valley: Five takeaways on new election interference from Iran, Russia | Schumer says briefing on Iranian election interference didn't convince him effort was meant to hurt Trump | Republicans on Senate panel subpoena Facebook, Twitter CEOs | On The Money: Pelosi cites progress, but says COVID-19 relief deal might be post-election | Eviction crisis sparked by pandemic disproportionately hits minorities | Weekly jobless claims fall to 787K MORE (D-Calif.) on Tuesday announced a formal impeachment inquiry, but several previous holdouts in the Senate have also joined the chorus.

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Others like Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisThe Hill's Campaign Report: Trump, Biden face off for last time on the debate stage Obama says he voted by mail: 'It's not as tough as a lot of folks think' Clean energy opportunities in a time of crisis MORE (Calif.), Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharDurbin says he will run for No. 2 spot if Dems win Senate majority Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing MORE (Minn.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenBiden defends his health plan from Trump attacks Progressives blast Biden plan to form panel on Supreme Court reform Biden endorses Texas Democratic House candidate Julie Oliver MORE have been calling for impeachment action since before the Ukraine news.

Here are the Senate Democrats who have called for an impeachment or an inquiry this week.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerFive takeaways on Iran, Russia election interference Pelosi calls Iran 'bad actor' but not equivalent to Russia on election interference Schumer says briefing on Iranian election interference didn't convince him effort was meant to hurt Trump MORE (N.Y.)

Schumer announced on Wednesday that he supported Pelosi’s impeachment inquiry.

"I strongly support Speaker Pelosi’s decision. If we don’t reckon with President Trump’s persistent transgressions, the very foundation of this great republic is at risk," Schumer said. "The president kept pushing and pushing and pushing the constitutional envelope. Finally, the president’s conduct made an impeachment inquiry unavoidable.”

"I know she did not make this decision lightly and took no pleasure in making it,” he added. “It is her carefully considered judgment that it is now in the best interest of our country and our Constitution to proceed with an impeachment inquiry.”

Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinBipartisan group of senators call on Trump to sanction Russia over Navalny poisoning Republicans advance Barrett's Supreme Court nomination after Democrats boycott committee vote The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Goldman Sachs - Pelosi, Mnuchin push stimulus talks forward, McConnell applies brakes MORE (Ill.)

Before Schumer’s statement, Durbin was the highest-ranking Senate Democrat to endorse an impeachment inquiry.

“I think this may be the straw that broke the camel’s back,” the Senate Democratic whip said Tuesday. “There’s so much cumulative evidence here and many of us have wondered if this would ever see the light of day in an impeachment inquiry. But I think now we have to move forward.”

Sen. Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyHealthcare, retirement security seen as top issues for older voters, lawmakers say The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Goldman Sachs - Two weeks out, Trump attempts to rally the base Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing MORE (Pa.)

Casey is the most recent senator to call for impeachment proceedings, and he's one of the most moderate Senate Democrats to do so.

“Given this clear abuse of power, I believe I have an obligation to outline the conduct, both during the Russian investigation and the Ukraine matter, that is within the well-established definition of the ‘high crimes and misdemeanors’ that the Senate would consider in an impeachment trial,” he said in a statement Wednesday afternoon.

“Surely, not every instance of presidential wrongdoing merits impeachment. Using the vast powers of impeachment in a cavalier fashion would be an insult to our Constitution,” Casey added. “However, a failure by Congress to pursue impeachment in the face of grave offenses by the President is just as insulting to our Constitution and our values.”

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyOvernight Health Care: Trump takes criticism of Fauci to a new level | GOP Health Committee chairman defends Fauci | Birx confronted Pence about Atlas Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing Senate Democrats seek to alleviate public concern about some results not being available on election night MORE (Conn.)

Murphy announced his support for an impeachment inquiry Tuesday, saying, “It is now my belief that the House of Representatives must begin an impeachment inquiry into the president’s corrupt efforts to press a foreign nation into the service of his reelection campaign.”

Murphy had been sharply critical of the handling of the whistleblower report before coming out in favor of an impeachment inquiry, particularly after Sen. John CornynJohn CornynThe Hill's Campaign Report: Obama to hit the campaign trail l Biden's eye-popping cash advantage l New battleground polls favor Biden Quinnipiac poll finds Biden, Trump tied in Texas Biden endorses Texas Democratic House candidate Julie Oliver MORE (R-Texas) questioned whether the whistleblower was a “leaker.”

"This is just a head shaking moment for me that Republicans don't give a damn about the national security of this country and are willing to let the president get away with this fundamental corruption," Murphy said Monday. "If that is the direction that they take—attacking the whistleblower, trying to cover up this corruption, it's a really, really sad day for the country."

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (Conn.)

Blumenthal on Tuesday morning called for the House to form an impeachment committee, hours before Pelosi announced the inquiry.

“I am calling today for a House Select Committee to investigate and move forward with impeachment proceedings against the President. I reached this decision with sadness, but also anger,” Blumenthal said in a statement.

“Congress must demand accountability," he added. "At this moment, the threat to the rule of law and our democracy has reached a new height and requires all of us to step forward.”

Sen. Chris van Hollen (Md.)

Van Hollen announced his support for an impeachment inquiry Tuesday shortly before Pelosi’s announcement.

“As the White House continues to prevent the House of Representatives from exercising their Constitutionally-mandated oversight role, it has become clear that the tools provided by an impeachment inquiry must be employed,” van Hollen said in a statement.

“I have not come to this decision lightly — and I regret that the President’s actions require these measures. But the American people deserve the truth and confidence in their government, and I support an impeachment inquiry in order to expose the facts and protect our democracy,” he added.

Sen. Tina SmithTina Flint SmithTina Smith and Jason Lewis tied in Minnesota Democratic senators unveil bill to ban discrimination in financial services industry Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing MORE (Minn.)

Smith struck a cautious note in her endorsement of an impeachment inquiry Tuesday, noting in a statement that impeachment is not the same as removal from office, which would meet a dead end in the GOP-controlled Senate.

“Impeachment is the only way in our system of constitutional checks and balances to establish whether a President has abused his power and put his own interests ahead of our national security and the rule of law,” Smith said in a statement.

“My job as Senator is to uphold the Constitution and the rule of law, and I must fulfill my responsibility to listen to all the evidence before making a final judgment,” she added.

Sen. Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzCoordinated federal leadership is needed for recovery of US travel and tourism Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing Hillicon Valley: Facebook, Twitter's handling of New York Post article raises election night concerns | FCC to move forward with considering order targeting tech's liability shield | YouTube expands polices to tackle QAnon MORE (Hawaii)

Schatz called for impeachment on Monday.

“[Trump] and his legal team argue that a sitting president’s authorities are so vast that they literally transcend the law. They argue that the Congress has a remedy for this criminality and defiance – the impeachment process,” Schatz said in a statement Monday.

“If that is their view, so be it. On behalf of the people who elected us, we must formalize and accelerate the impeachment process so that Congress, by exercising its responsibility under Article 1 of the Constitution, can provide some measure of accountability,” he added.

Updated at 7:23 p.m.