Whistleblower complaint delivered to Congress

Members of Congress have started to review the whistleblower complaint about President Trump’s call with a foreign nation that spurred the House to launch a formal impeachment inquiry. 

The complaint, which a source confirmed to be over Trump’s call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, was delivered to Congress after being requested by both the House and Senate Intelligence committees. 

Members of the Senate Intelligence committee were going in and out of the Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility to review the complaint Wednesday afternoon. 

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One lawmaker said the complaint was 10 to 12 pages long.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck SchumerChuck SchumerRomney: I never got a call from White House to discuss voting rights Kyrsten Sinema's courage, Washington hypocrisy and the politics of rage Joe Biden's disastrous 48 hours MORE (D-N.Y.) told reporters the complaint is “very troubling.” 

“All I’ll tell you is this. Two things: Number one, having read the documents in there, I’m even more worried about what happened than when I read the memorandum of the conversation. There are so many facts that have to be examined. It’s very troubling,” Schumer said. 

Rep. Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesGOP lawmaker adheres to term limit pledge, won't run for reelection The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Altria - Winter is here for Democrats Hillicon Valley — GOP leader criticizes Twitter over Greene ban MORE (R-Calif.), the top Republican on the House Intelligence committee, had said the Director of National Intelligence was going transmit the complaint at 4 p.m. 

Earlier Wednesday the White House released a memo with a partial transcript of Trump’s call with Zelensky that showed Trump asking Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenCarville advises Democrats to 'quit being a whiny party' Wendy Sherman takes leading role as Biden's 'hard-nosed' Russia negotiator Sullivan: 'It's too soon to tell' if Texas synagogue hostage situation part of broader extremist threat MORE.

Jordain Carney contributed