GOP senator: Trump has changed presidency 'not necessarily toward the positive'

Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonRon Johnson signals some GOP senators concerned about his Obama-era probes Democrats ramp up warnings on Russian election meddling Hillicon Valley: Facebook removed over 22 million posts for hate speech in second quarter | Republicans introduce bill to defend universities against hackers targeting COVID-19 research | Facebook's Sandberg backs Harris as VP pick MORE (R-Wis.) said on Monday that he thinks President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew Bob Woodward book will include details of 25 personal letters between Trump and Kim Jong Un On The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' Biden commemorates anniversary of Charlottesville 'Unite the Right' rally: 'We are in a battle for the soul of our nation' MORE has changed the presidency, but signaled it isn't necessarily in the right direction. 
 
"I think so, not necessarily toward the positive either," Johnson said during an interview in Wisconsin with WTMJ. 
 
Johnson added that former President Clinton had also shifted the "behavior and the standard of the presidency."
 
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"It's unfortunate. I revere our Constitution. I revere these institutions, including the office of the presidency. It would be nice if everybody conducted themselves, I guess, the way we would here in Wisconsin," Johnson continued. 
 
Johnson was asked about Trump's behavior, but didn't point to a specific incident during the interview. His comments come as Congress is locked in an impeachment fight fueled by the president's interactions with the leader of Ukraine.
 
Johnson, who has emerged as one of Trump's most vocal supporters on Ukraine, said on Monday that "there has been a concerted effort from Day 1 to sabotage this administration." 
 
"I don't agree with everything he's doing, but I have to give him a great deal of credit," Johnson said. 
 
The White House last week released a partial transcript of Trump's call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. In the call, according to the document, Trump asked Zelensky to work with his personal attorney Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiFeehery: Weak mayors destroy America's great cities Coronavirus concerns emerge around debates Giuliani says Black Lives Matter is 'domestic terrorist' group MORE, and expressed hope that he “can look into” former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenRon Johnson signals some GOP senators concerned about his Obama-era probes On The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' Biden commemorates anniversary of Charlottesville 'Unite the Right' rally: 'We are in a battle for the soul of our nation' MORE and his son.
 
Johnson said on Monday that there was no "quid pro quo" in the Trump call, but that he has "a lot of questions" about Ukraine and Democrats.