Graham says he'll invite Giuliani to testify about Ukraine

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamWhat you need to know about FBI official Dana Boente's retirement Rosenstein steps back into GOP crosshairs The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump tweets as tensions escalate across US MORE (R-S.C.) said on Tuesday that he will invite President TrumpDonald John TrumpSessions accepts 'Fox News Sunday' invitation to debate, Tuberville declines Priest among those police cleared from St. John's Church patio for Trump visit Trump criticizes CNN on split-screen audio of Rose Garden address, protesters clashing with police MORE's personal lawyer Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiRudy Giuliani calls on Cuomo to remove Bill de Blasio Sunday shows preview: States begin to reopen even as some areas in US see case counts increase Moussaoui says he now renounces terrorism, bin Laden MORE to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee about Ukraine.
 
"I will offer to Mr. Giuliani the opportunity to come before the Senate Judiciary Committee to inform the committee of his concerns," Graham said in a string of tweets.
Graham said that his decision came after hearing from Giuliani on "numerous occasions disturbing allegations ... about corruption in Ukraine and the many improprieties surrounding the firing of former Prosecutor General Viktor Shokin."
 
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"Given the House of Representatives’ behavior, it is time for the Senate to inquire about corruption and other improprieties involving Ukraine," he added.
 
Graham didn't specifically mention former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPresidents and 'presidents' Biden to blast Trump's church photo op in Philadelphia speech Rudy Giuliani calls on Cuomo to remove Bill de Blasio MORE or the Democratic presidential contender's son Hunter Biden as part of his public invitation.
 
But the hearing would likely give Giuliani a forum to air his claims that Biden, while serving as vice president, pushed a former top prosecutor in Ukraine to be fired to help his son.
 
There's been no evidence of wrongdoing by the former vice president.
 
"I would consider it very seriously just have to check out the question of privilege," Giuliani said in a text message to The Hill.

It would also give three 2020 Democratic presidential candidates — Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerSchumer calls on McConnell to schedule vote on law enforcement reform bill before July 4 This week: Senate reconvenes as protests roil nation amid pandemic City leaders, Democratic lawmakers urge Trump to tamp down rhetoric as protests rage across US MORE (N.J.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHarris: Trump 'just tear-gassed peaceful protesters for a photo op' Harris, Jeffries question why Manafort, Cohen released while others remain in prison George Floyd's death ramps up the pressure on Biden for a black VP MORE (Calif.) and Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharBottom line Judd Gregg: Biden — a path to the presidency, or not Vogue's Anna Wintour urges Biden to pick woman of color for VP MORE (Minn.) — a high-profile stage to question Giuliani, and knock Trump.

Harris quickly pounced on Graham's announcement, writing in a tweet: "Good. I have questions."

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinGraham announces hearing on police use of force after George Floyd killing Frustration builds in key committee ahead of Graham subpoena vote  The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Major space launch today; Trump feuds with Twitter MORE (Calif.), the top Democrat on the Judiciary panel, added in a statement that Democrats would support having Giuliani testify and would want to question him "about his role in seeking the Ukrainian government’s assistance to investigate one of the president’s political rivals."

"Democratic members have plenty of questions for Mr. Giuliani and this would give us an opportunity to help separate fact from fiction for the American people," she added. 

The decision to invite Giuliani marks a reversal for Graham, who had previously indicated that he wanted "all things Ukraine" investigated but didn't think the Senate should be the body leading the probe.

Asked what action he would take in the Judiciary Committee about Hunter Biden's dealings in Ukraine, Graham told reporters before the two-week recess that "we're not going to do anything."

“I don’t want to turn the Senate into a circus,” Graham added. “I want somebody to look at the conflict of interest outside of politics.”

He had also previously criticized Giuliani, telling reporters last month that "I’m not sure he’s helping the president by being on TV every 15 minutes."

Graham has emerged as a vocal defender of Trump, even as most of his Senate GOP colleagues have remained mum about the president publicly asking China and Ukraine to investigate a potential 2020 rival.

His probe into "corruption and other improprieties" tied to Ukraine comes as the Senate Intelligence Committee is investigating a whistleblower complaint tied to Trump's actions toward Ukraine. That panel's chairman, Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.), unlike Graham, has largely remained silent in the wake of the allegations against Trump.

House Democrats are also at the start of an impeachment inquiry centered on Trump asking the Ukrainian government to work with Giuliani to look into the Bidens and allegations that the president tried to withhold aid to Ukraine in an effort to get Kiev to launch such a probe.

Graham blasted House Democrats late Monday amid reports that they could hold a closed-door interview with the whistleblower outside of the Capitol complex or distort the person's voice or appearance over concerns that Republicans will leak the individual's identity.

"To House Democrats: Everyone in America -- including President @realDonaldTrump -- has the right to confront their accuser," Graham tweeted on Monday.

Giuliani, meanwhile, has become a key figure in the House impeachment inquiry.

House Democrats subpoenaed Giuliani late last month as part of an effort to force him to hand over documents, including text messages and phone records, regarding Hunter Biden and efforts by Giuliani or his associates to pressure current or former Ukrainian officials to investigate matters regarding the Bidens or any other American.

Giuliani also told CNN earlier this month that part of the documents handed over by the State Department inspector general to congressional staffers, and Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinHouse holds first-ever proxy votes during pandemic Dozens of Democrats plan to vote remotely in a first for the House House members race to prepare for first-ever remote votes MORE (D-Md.), originated with him.

The State Department watchdog turned over a packet of paperwork that Democrats blasted as "propaganda." The paperwork, according to staffers who attended the briefing, included theories about former Vice President Biden, his son Hunter Biden and former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch. 

--Alexander Bolton and Brett Samuels contributed to this report, which was updated at 12:55 p.m.