Three 2020 candidates have missed about half of Senate votes

Three 2020 candidates have missed about half of Senate votes
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Three Democratic 2020 presidential candidates have missed about half of their Senate votes since the beginning of the year. 

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerWarren says she will unveil plan to finance 'Medicare for All' Gabbard hits back at 'queen of warmongers' Clinton The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden camp faces new challenges MORE (D-N.J.) has the lowest attendance record for votes in the current Senate, missing more than 52 percent since the start of the 116th Congress in January to the end of September, according to ProPublica numbers first highlighted by the San Francisco Chronicle.

Following Booker, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisWarren says she will unveil plan to finance 'Medicare for All' Kamala Harris reacts to supporter who got tattoo of her handwriting Even with likely Trump impeachment, Democrats face uphill climb to win presidency MORE (D-Calif.) has missed about 50.5 percent of the votes. Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersWarren says making Israel aid conditional on settlement building is 'on the table' Warren says she will unveil plan to finance 'Medicare for All' Ocasio-Cortez says endorsing Sanders early is 'the most authentic decision' she could make MORE (I-Vt.) placed third in terms of vote absences, missing 49.8 percent.

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Fellow White House hopefuls and Democratic Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenZuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Warren, Yang fight over automation divides experts Warren says making Israel aid conditional on settlement building is 'on the table' MORE (Mass.), Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetSenate Democrats want Warren to talk costs on 'Medicare for All' The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden camp faces new challenges Bennet reintroduces bill to ban lawmakers from becoming lobbyists MORE (Colo.) and Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharDeVos calls Democratic presidential hopeful's education plans 'crazy' Senate Democrats want Warren to talk costs on 'Medicare for All' Biden struggles to reverse fall MORE (Minn.) all missed more than a quarter of the votes this year, as did former candidate Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSanders seeks spark from Ocasio-Cortez at Queens rally Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — House passes resolution rebuking Trump over Syria | Sparks fly at White House meeting on Syria | Dems say Trump called Pelosi a 'third-rate politician' | Trump, Graham trade jabs Senate confirms Trump's Air Force secretary pick MORE (D-N.Y.).

Booker and Harris had led with the lowest voting attendance after the year's first session of Congress from January to March. 

Low voting attendance is typical among presidential candidates as they campaign across the country and prepare for debates and other events. The attendance of all of the presidential candidates in the Senate has steadily decreased throughout the year.

The GOP-led Senate has prioritized confirming the president's judicial and Cabinet nominees, which Democratic senators have little hope of hindering from their position the minority.

Republican Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioTurkey says soldier killed despite cease-fire in Syria White House staggers after tumultuous 48 hours Erdoğan got the best of Trump, experts warn MORE (Fla.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamZuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Graham: 'Stupid' for Trump to ask China to investigate Biden Turkey sanctions face possible wall in GOP Senate MORE (S.C.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzHillicon Valley: GOP lawmakers offer election security measure | FTC Dem worries government is 'captured' by Big Tech | Lawmakers condemn Apple over Hong Kong censorship Lawmakers condemn Apple, Activision Blizzard over censorship of Hong Kong protesters The Hill's Morning Report — Trump's impeachment jeopardy deepens MORE (Texas) missed the most votes in 2016 when they were campaigning for the presidency. Rubio had the lowest attendance, missing 35 percent of votes in 2015.

The Hill reached out to the Booker, Harris and Sanders campaigns for comment.