Giuliani predicts Senate Judiciary will call on Biden to testify on Ukraine

President TrumpDonald John TrumpZuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Trump leaning toward keeping a couple hundred troops in eastern Syria: report Warren says making Israel aid conditional on settlement building is 'on the table' MORE’s personal lawyer Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiHurd: No Ukrainian officials have told State Department 'they felt like their arms were being twisted' House Democrat pledges 'there will be open hearings' in impeachment inquiry Combatting fake news on social media will take a village MORE said he believes Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamZuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Graham: 'Stupid' for Trump to ask China to investigate Biden Turkey sanctions face possible wall in GOP Senate MORE (R-S.C.) will call former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenZuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Graham: 'Stupid' for Trump to ask China to investigate Biden Romney: Republicans don't criticize Trump because they fear it will help Warren MORE and his son Hunter Biden to testify before his panel about corruption in Ukraine.

Graham told reporters weeks ago that he had no intention of bringing the Bidens in, but Giuliani said he believed that position had changed amid an escalating Democratic impeachment effort. 

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“I think that changed. Go ask him now,” Giuliani told The Hill Wednesday when asked if Graham made a mistake by ruling out the possible appearance of Joe or Hunter Biden before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

A spokeswoman for the Judiciary Committee did not indicate Graham's position had changed, saying the senator will make a final determination on witnesses at a later date.

“On witnesses, we’ll hear from Giuliani and then determine what, if any, additional witnesses need to be called,” said Taylor Reidy.

Giuliani says the Bidens are key witnesses related to an investigation into corruption in Ukraine and allegations that interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election stemmed from Ukraine and not Russia.

“If I were in the House and I had subpoena power, my first witness would be Joe Biden — for Trump. Because I would want to show the corruption that he unleashed in Ukraine that deprived us of the information that could have exonerated the president,” Giuliani said.

“My second witness would be Hunter and then a group of Ukrainians who would explain how they were engaged in vast corruption there, which would justify the president asking the president of Ukraine to follow up,” he added, referring to a July 25 phone conversation between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

Biden called for Trump's impeachment on Wednesday, the first time he has gone that far. The impeachment effort in the House centers on Trump's efforts to get Zelensky to investigate Biden. 

Graham expressed reluctance before the two-week congressional recess about delving into the allegations Giuliani has raised. 

“I don’t want to turn the Senate into a circus,” Graham said, adding he saw no reason to call Hunter Biden before committee. “We’re not going to do anything because we don’t have any jurisdiction. I have no interest in opening up that front. I don’t want to blow up the Senate.”

Graham also said he had no interest in calling Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrFederal prosecutors interviewed multiple FBI officials for Russia probe review: report Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe Mulvaney ties withheld Ukraine aid to political probe sought by Trump MORE before his panel to testify on Ukrainian corruption or Trump’s call with Zelensky, asserting it was the Senate Intelligence Committee’s job.

But Graham appeared to shift course on Tuesday when he announced he will invite Giuliani to speak to his committee about Ukraine-related matters.

"I will offer to Mr. Giuliani the opportunity to come before the Senate Judiciary Committee to inform the committee of his concerns," Graham said in a series of tweets, arguing that he was responding to the unfolding impeachment process in the House.

“Given the House of Representatives’ behavior, it is time for the Senate to inquire about corruption and other improprieties involving Ukraine,” he tweeted. 

Graham said in an interview on Fox News Wednesday that he and Giuliani spoke the day before.

“He’s claiming to have a lot of evidence about corruption in the Ukraine that ties back to the Democrats,” he said. “I think Rudy’s got a story to tell. I want him to tell it in my committee. He’d be respectfully treated.”

The spokeswoman for the Judiciary Committee said the format of Giuliani’s testimony, whether in open session or behind closed doors, is yet to be decided.