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Senate fails to override Trump veto over emergency declaration

Senate fails to override Trump veto over emergency declaration
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Senators voted 53-36, falling short of the two-thirds needed to successfully override Trump's veto.
 
Ten Republican senators voted to override Trump's veto: Sens. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntBottom Line GOP vows quick confirmation of Trump's Supreme Court pick amid coronavirus turmoil This week: Coronavirus complicates Senate's Supreme Court fight MORE (Mo.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate GOP eyes Oct. 26 for confirming Barrett to Supreme Court GOP blocks Schumer effort to adjourn Senate until after election This week: Clock ticks on chance for coronavirus deal MORE (Maine), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeTed Cruz won't wear mask to speak to reporters at Capitol Michigan Republican isolating after positive coronavirus test Barrett fight puts focus on abortion in 2020 election MORE (Utah), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenate GOP eyes Oct. 26 for confirming Barrett to Supreme Court This week: Clock ticks on chance for coronavirus deal Climate change — Trump's golden opportunity MORE (Alaska), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulMichigan Republican isolating after positive coronavirus test GOP Rep. Mike Bost tests positive for COVID-19 Top Democrats introduce resolution calling for mask mandate, testing program in Senate MORE (Ky.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGOP blocks Schumer effort to adjourn Senate until after election Candymakers meet virtually with lawmakers for annual fly-in, discuss Halloween safety Democrats look past Election Day in Barrett fight  MORE (Ohio), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyGOP noncommittal about vote on potential Trump-Pelosi coronavirus deal 10 bellwether counties that could signal where the election is headed The Memo: Trump's second-term chances fade MORE (Utah), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOwners of meatpacker JBS to pay 0M fine over foreign bribery charges Questions raised about conflicts of interest around Biden son-in-law America needs an industrial policy — now more than ever MORE (Fla.), Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyAppeals court rules NSA's bulk phone data collection illegal Dunford withdraws from consideration to chair coronavirus oversight panel GOP senators push for quick, partial reopening of economy MORE (Pa.) and Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerSenate Republicans offer constitutional amendment to block Supreme Court packing Government efforts to 'fix' social media bias overlooks the destruction of our discourse The Section 230 fight Congress should be having MORE (Miss.).
 
The vote came less than a day after Trump vetoed the resolution, which initially passed by the House and Senate last month.
 
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Trump, in his veto message to the Senate, said the national emergency has allowed the administration to "counter large-scale unlawful migration" and facilitated the construction of his long-promised border wall.

"In short, the situation on our southern border remains a national emergency, and our Armed Forces are still needed to help confront it," he added.
 
Trump declared a national emergency earlier this year after Congress gave him less than $1.4 billion for barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border. As part of the declaration, Trump shifted $3.6 billion away from military construction projects to go toward the wall. 
 
The move infuriated both Democrats and Republicans, who publicly warned him against using his emergency powers to build the wall. GOP lawmakers, in particular, worried that it would let a future Democratic president leapfrog Congress on issues like gun control or climate change. 
 
But the veto override had been expected to fall short after the resolution initially passed the Senate with only 54 votes, including the support of 11 Republican senators. 
 
It's the second time Congress has failed to override Trump's veto of a resolution nixing his emergency declaration. The House tried, unsuccessfully, in March to override Trump's initial veto. 
 
 
"It's up to this body to assert our constitutional authority and override that veto. Not only is it a fundamental constitutional principle at stake, the president's emergency declaration has real-life impacts, impacts to our national security and impacts to the 23 states whose projects are now gone," Udall said.