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Schumer warns Intel officials that Trump could expose whistleblower

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerPew poll: 50 percent approve of Democrats in Congress Former state Rep. Vernon Jones launches challenge to Kemp in Georgia Schumer lays groundwork for future filibuster reform MORE (D-N.Y.) is warning top intelligence community officials that President TrumpDonald TrumpFreedom Caucus member condemns GOP group pushing 'Anglo-Saxon political traditions' MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell's new free speech site to ban certain curse words Secret Facebook groups of special operations officers include racist comments, QAnon posts: report MORE could expose a whistleblower at the center of the House impeachment inquiry.

Schumer sent a letter to acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph MaguireJoseph MaguireJudge dismisses Nunes's defamation suit against Washington Post Retired Navy admiral behind bin Laden raid says he voted for Biden Congressional Democrats request FBI briefing on foreign election interference efforts MORE and Inspector General Michael Atkinson on Monday saying he's "concerned" Trump might disclose the individual's identity and wants to know what steps are being taken to protect the person.

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"In light of the President’s ill-advised statements, his lack of respect for the rule of law and his well-documented habit of condoning violence by his supporters, I am concerned that he may disclose the whistleblower’s identity or cause it to be disclosed by others in the Administration," Schumer wrote in the letter.

Trump and his allies have repeatedly lashed out at the whistleblower, who filed a complaint tied to Trump pushing the Ukraine government to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenFour members of Sikh community among victims in Indianapolis shooting Overnight Health: NIH reverses Trump's ban on fetal tissue research | Biden investing .7B to fight virus variants | CDC panel to meet again Friday on J&J On The Money: Moderates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats | Justice Dept. sues Trump ally Roger Stone for unpaid taxes MORE and his son and the administration's decision to delay aid to the country.

Schumer's letter, which was first reported by Politico, comes shortly after Trump used a Cabinet meeting to double down on his demand that the whistleblower be publicly identified.

"I think they want to impeach me because it's the only way they're going to win. ... They've got nothing. All they have is a phone call that is perfect. All they have is a whistleblower who's disappeared. Where is he?" Trump asked.

Trump has also called the whistleblower a "fraud," and argued he has the right to confront the individual.

Schumer added in his letter that if the whistleblower's identity is disclosed, Maguire and Atkinson have the responsibility to protect the person from retaliation.

"I understand that some security measures may already have been put in place, but I fear that safety risks may intensify in the event that the whistleblower’s identity is disclosed. I also note reports that one or more additional whistleblowers may come forward, creating added security concern," Schumer wrote.

"I therefore ask that you inform me regarding your plans to ensure that these whistleblowers are adequately protected," he added.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffOvernight Defense: Administration says 'low to moderate confidence' Russia behind Afghanistan troop bounties | 'Low to medium risk' of Russia invading Ukraine in next few weeks | Intelligence leaders face sharp questions during House worldwide threats he Hillicon Valley: Biden administration sanctions Russia for SolarWinds hack, election interference Intelligence leaders face sharp questions during House worldwide threats hearing MORE (D-Calif.) said earlier this month that testimony from the intelligence community whistleblower may no longer be necessary since the White House released a partial transcript of the call in question.

"Given that we already have the call record, we don't need the whistleblower who wasn't on the call to tell us what took place during the call," he told Margaret Brennan during an interview on CBS's "Face the Nation."