Schumer warns Intel officials that Trump could expose whistleblower

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerLawmakers push Trump to restore full funding for National Guards responding to pandemic Bipartisan senators ask congressional leadership to extend census deadline Lawmakers of color urge Democratic leadership to protect underserved communities in coronavirus talks MORE (D-N.Y.) is warning top intelligence community officials that President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrat calls on White House to withdraw ambassador to Belarus nominee TikTok collected data from mobile devices to track Android users: report Peterson wins Minnesota House primary in crucial swing district MORE could expose a whistleblower at the center of the House impeachment inquiry.

Schumer sent a letter to acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph MaguireJoseph MaguireCongressional Democrats request FBI briefing on foreign election interference efforts Wells Fargo told employees to delete TikTok from work phones Hillicon Valley: Pompeo floats TikTok ban | Civil rights groups slam Facebook after call | Election security funding included in proposal MORE and Inspector General Michael Atkinson on Monday saying he's "concerned" Trump might disclose the individual's identity and wants to know what steps are being taken to protect the person.

ADVERTISEMENT

"In light of the President’s ill-advised statements, his lack of respect for the rule of law and his well-documented habit of condoning violence by his supporters, I am concerned that he may disclose the whistleblower’s identity or cause it to be disclosed by others in the Administration," Schumer wrote in the letter.

Trump and his allies have repeatedly lashed out at the whistleblower, who filed a complaint tied to Trump pushing the Ukraine government to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenNAACP seeks to boost Black voter turnout in six states Biden touts Trump saying Harris would be 'fine choice' for VP pick Kamala Harris: The conventional (and predictable) pick all along MORE and his son and the administration's decision to delay aid to the country.

Schumer's letter, which was first reported by Politico, comes shortly after Trump used a Cabinet meeting to double down on his demand that the whistleblower be publicly identified.

"I think they want to impeach me because it's the only way they're going to win. ... They've got nothing. All they have is a phone call that is perfect. All they have is a whistleblower who's disappeared. Where is he?" Trump asked.

Trump has also called the whistleblower a "fraud," and argued he has the right to confront the individual.

Schumer added in his letter that if the whistleblower's identity is disclosed, Maguire and Atkinson have the responsibility to protect the person from retaliation.

"I understand that some security measures may already have been put in place, but I fear that safety risks may intensify in the event that the whistleblower’s identity is disclosed. I also note reports that one or more additional whistleblowers may come forward, creating added security concern," Schumer wrote.

"I therefore ask that you inform me regarding your plans to ensure that these whistleblowers are adequately protected," he added.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffGOP chairmen hit back at accusation they are spreading disinformation with Biden probe Schiff, Khanna call for free masks for all Americans in coronavirus aid package House Intelligence panel opens probe into DHS's involvement in response to protests MORE (D-Calif.) said earlier this month that testimony from the intelligence community whistleblower may no longer be necessary since the White House released a partial transcript of the call in question.

"Given that we already have the call record, we don't need the whistleblower who wasn't on the call to tell us what took place during the call," he told Margaret Brennan during an interview on CBS's "Face the Nation."