Schumer warns Intel officials that Trump could expose whistleblower

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerPelosi slams Trump executive order on pre-existing conditions: It 'isn't worth the paper it's signed on' 3 reasons why Biden is misreading the politics of court packing Cruz blocks amended resolution honoring Ginsburg over language about her dying wish MORE (D-N.Y.) is warning top intelligence community officials that President TrumpDonald John TrumpSteele Dossier sub-source was subject of FBI counterintelligence probe Pelosi slams Trump executive order on pre-existing conditions: It 'isn't worth the paper it's signed on' Trump 'no longer angry' at Romney because of Supreme Court stance MORE could expose a whistleblower at the center of the House impeachment inquiry.

Schumer sent a letter to acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph MaguireJoseph MaguireCongressional Democrats request FBI briefing on foreign election interference efforts Wells Fargo told employees to delete TikTok from work phones Hillicon Valley: Pompeo floats TikTok ban | Civil rights groups slam Facebook after call | Election security funding included in proposal MORE and Inspector General Michael Atkinson on Monday saying he's "concerned" Trump might disclose the individual's identity and wants to know what steps are being taken to protect the person.

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"In light of the President’s ill-advised statements, his lack of respect for the rule of law and his well-documented habit of condoning violence by his supporters, I am concerned that he may disclose the whistleblower’s identity or cause it to be disclosed by others in the Administration," Schumer wrote in the letter.

Trump and his allies have repeatedly lashed out at the whistleblower, who filed a complaint tied to Trump pushing the Ukraine government to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPelosi slams Trump executive order on pre-existing conditions: It 'isn't worth the paper it's signed on' Hillicon Valley: Subpoenas for Facebook, Google and Twitter on the cards | Wray rebuffs mail-in voting conspiracies | Reps. raise mass surveillance concerns Fox News poll: Biden ahead of Trump in Nevada, Pennsylvania and Ohio MORE and his son and the administration's decision to delay aid to the country.

Schumer's letter, which was first reported by Politico, comes shortly after Trump used a Cabinet meeting to double down on his demand that the whistleblower be publicly identified.

"I think they want to impeach me because it's the only way they're going to win. ... They've got nothing. All they have is a phone call that is perfect. All they have is a whistleblower who's disappeared. Where is he?" Trump asked.

Trump has also called the whistleblower a "fraud," and argued he has the right to confront the individual.

Schumer added in his letter that if the whistleblower's identity is disclosed, Maguire and Atkinson have the responsibility to protect the person from retaliation.

"I understand that some security measures may already have been put in place, but I fear that safety risks may intensify in the event that the whistleblower’s identity is disclosed. I also note reports that one or more additional whistleblowers may come forward, creating added security concern," Schumer wrote.

"I therefore ask that you inform me regarding your plans to ensure that these whistleblowers are adequately protected," he added.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffSchiff claims DHS is blocking whistleblower's access to records before testimony GOP lawmakers distance themselves from Trump comments on transfer of power Rubio on peaceful transfer of power: 'We will have a legitimate & fair election' MORE (D-Calif.) said earlier this month that testimony from the intelligence community whistleblower may no longer be necessary since the White House released a partial transcript of the call in question.

"Given that we already have the call record, we don't need the whistleblower who wasn't on the call to tell us what took place during the call," he told Margaret Brennan during an interview on CBS's "Face the Nation."