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Romney, Collins, Murkowski only Senate GOP holdouts on Graham's impeachment resolution

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamOn The Money: Yellen, Powell brush off inflation fears | Fed keeps rates steady, upgrades growth projections Democrats shift tone on unemployment benefits Bipartisan infrastructure group grows to 20 senators MORE (R-S.C.) said on Friday that all but three GOP senators had signed onto his resolution condemning the House impeachment inquiry. 

GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate confirms Radhika Fox to lead EPA's water office Pelosi says she's giving Senate more time on Jan. 6 commission Overnight Energy: Schumer to trigger reconciliation process Wednesday | Bipartisan bill would ban 'forever chemicals' in cosmetics | Biden admin eyes step toward Trump-era proposal for uranium reserve MORE (Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenate confirms Radhika Fox to lead EPA's water office Democrat presses Haaland on oil and gas review Hundreds in West Virginia protest Manchin's opposition to voting rights legislation MORE (Alaska) and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyChina's genocide must be stopped How Biden can get the infrastructure bill through Congress The Hill's 12:30 Report: Sights and sounds from Biden's European trip MORE (Utah) have not yet signed onto the resolution, according to an updated list of co-sponsors shared by Graham the day after he introduced the measure. 

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A spokesperson for Collins didn't immediately respond to a request for comment about whether or not she would back the resolution.

A spokeswoman for Romney noted that he said on Thursday that he would look at the resolution. 

"I’d like to see a vote taken in the House to decide whether there is support for impeachment. I’d love to see a more open process," Romney said. 

Murkowski also told reporters on Thursday that she hadn't yet read the resolution, which formally opposes the impeachment inquiry and urges House Democrats to hold an official vote on it. 

The resolution also says the House should give President TrumpDonald TrumpNorth Carolina Senate passes trio of election measures 14 Republicans vote against making Juneteenth a federal holiday Border state governors rebel against Biden's immigration chaos MORE "due process" including "the ability to confront his accusers" and that House Republicans should be able to subpoena their own witnesses. 

When Graham introduced the resolution, he had 39 co-sponsors, but that quickly ticked up to 44, with only nine Republicans not signed on as of Thursday afternoon: Romney, Collins, Murkowski and Sens. Cory GardnerCory GardnerBiden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court rules against fast-track of Trump EPA's 'secret science' rule | Bureau of Land Management exodus: Agency lost 87 percent of staff in Trump HQ relocation | GM commits to electric light duty fleet by 2035 MORE (Colo.), Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderAuthorities link ex-Tennessee governor to killing of Jimmy Hoffa associate The Republicans' deep dive into nativism Senate GOP faces retirement brain drain MORE (Tenn.), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziThe unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - CDC news on gatherings a step toward normality Lummis adopts 'laser eyes' meme touting Bitcoin MORE (Wyo.), Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanConcerns grow over China's Taiwan plans China conducts amphibious landing drill near Taiwan after senators' visit US, Taiwan to discuss trade, investments, Blinken says MORE (Alaska), Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonLoeffler meets with McConnell amid speculation of another Senate run Loeffler group targets Democrats with billboards around baseball stadium Warnock raises nearly M since January victory MORE (Ga.) and Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanG-7 summit exposes incoherence of US foreign policy Senate panel unanimously advances key Biden cyber nominees Hillicon Valley: Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC | Lawmakers urge Biden to be tough on cyber during summit with Putin | TSA working on additional security regulations following Colonial Pipeline hack MORE (Ohio). 

Graham tweeted early Thursday evening that Portman and Sullivan had signed on as co-sponsors, while Alexander, Isakson, Gardner and Enzi were in the list of co-sponsors released by Graham on Friday.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellLoeffler meets with McConnell amid speculation of another Senate run Manchin opens door to supporting scaled-down election reform bill Pelosi, Schumer must appoint new commissioners to the CARES Act oversight panel MORE (R-Ky.), who supports the resolution, has not said if it will come up for a vote. If it did, it would currently fail to overcome a procedural hurdle that requires legislation get 60 votes in order to advance on the Senate floor. 

Republicans have fumed over the House impeachment inquiry, which has held near-daily closed-door depositions with current and former administration officials

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy Pelosi Pelosi says she's giving Senate more time on Jan. 6 commission Ocasio-Cortez, Gillibrand and Moulton call for more high-speed rail funding in infrastructure package Pelosi picks Democrats for special panel tackling inequality MORE (D-Calif.) has said a formal vote for the inquiry isn't required. Republicans, however, want a vote because it would put swing-district Democrats on the record and give them more leverage to call their own witnesses. 

Neither Collins, who is up for reelection next year, nor Murkowski nor Romney has backed the House impeachment inquiry or removing Trump from office. 

But they've each refrained from taking a position, or chided colleagues who have already made a decision on impeachment. 

"I'll keep an open mind until and unless there is some kind of decision reached by the House. ... It's a purposeful effort on my part to stay unbiased, and to see the evidence as it's brought forward," Romney told reporters in Utah earlier this month.

Murkowski, speaking during a recent health care event in Alaska, said it was “troubling ... that even before there has been any considered review, that people have decided.” Meanwhile, Collins said it was "entirely inappropriate" for colleagues to have already "made up their minds." 

—Updated at 4:29 p.m.