Romney, Collins, Murkowski only Senate GOP holdouts on Graham's impeachment resolution

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSeveral GOP lawmakers express concern over Trump executive orders Graham says he appreciates Trump orders, but 'would much prefer a congressional agreement' Sunday shows preview: White House, congressional Democrats unable to breach stalemate over coronavirus relief MORE (R-S.C.) said on Friday that all but three GOP senators had signed onto his resolution condemning the House impeachment inquiry. 

GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsCoronavirus deal key to Republicans protecting Senate majority From a Republican donor to Senate GOP: Remove marriage penalty or risk alienating voters The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump's visit to battleground Ohio overshadowed by coronavirus MORE (Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOn The Money: Pessimism grows as coronavirus talks go down to the wire | Jobs report poised to light fire under COVID-19 talks | Tax preparers warn unemployment recipients could owe IRS Pessimism grows as coronavirus talks go down to the wire Hillicon Valley: Facebook removes Trump post | TikTok gets competitor | Lawmakers raise grid safety concerns MORE (Alaska) and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyFrom a Republican donor to Senate GOP: Remove marriage penalty or risk alienating voters Tennessee primary battle turns nasty for Republicans NRCC poll finds McBath ahead of Handel in Georgia MORE (Utah) have not yet signed onto the resolution, according to an updated list of co-sponsors shared by Graham the day after he introduced the measure. 

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A spokesperson for Collins didn't immediately respond to a request for comment about whether or not she would back the resolution.

A spokeswoman for Romney noted that he said on Thursday that he would look at the resolution. 

"I’d like to see a vote taken in the House to decide whether there is support for impeachment. I’d love to see a more open process," Romney said. 

Murkowski also told reporters on Thursday that she hadn't yet read the resolution, which formally opposes the impeachment inquiry and urges House Democrats to hold an official vote on it. 

The resolution also says the House should give President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeWine tests negative for coronavirus a second time Several GOP lawmakers express concern over Trump executive orders Beirut aftermath poses test for US aid to frustrating ally MORE "due process" including "the ability to confront his accusers" and that House Republicans should be able to subpoena their own witnesses. 

When Graham introduced the resolution, he had 39 co-sponsors, but that quickly ticked up to 44, with only nine Republicans not signed on as of Thursday afternoon: Romney, Collins, Murkowski and Sens. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerCoronavirus deal key to Republicans protecting Senate majority From a Republican donor to Senate GOP: Remove marriage penalty or risk alienating voters The US military has options against China MORE (Colo.), Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderSeveral GOP lawmakers express concern over Trump executive orders The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the Air Line Pilots Association - Negotiators 'far apart' as talks yield little ahead of deadline Trump-backed Hagerty wins Tennessee GOP Senate primary MORE (Tenn.), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziChamber of Commerce endorses Ernst for reelection Republicans battle over COVID-19 package's big price tag Conservative group launches ad campaign for Rep. Roger Marshall in Kansas Senate race MORE (Wyo.), Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanLincoln Project targets Senate races in Alaska, Maine, Montana with M ad buy Overnight Energy: Official says protesters not cleared from Lafayette Square for Trump | Trump administration blasts banks refusing to fund Arctic drilling | 2019 coal production hit lowest level since 1978 Trump administration blasts banks that refuse to fund arctic drilling MORE (Alaska), Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonMatt Lieberman faces calls to drop out of Georgia Senate race over 'racist and discriminatory' tropes in 2018 book Sabato's Crystal Ball shifts Iowa Senate race to 'toss-up,' Georgia toward GOP WNBA players wear 'Vote Warnock' shirts in support of Loeffler Democratic challenger MORE (Ga.) and Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanNot a pretty picture: Money laundering and America's art market Pessimism grows as coronavirus talks go down to the wire Senators holding behind-the-scenes talks on breaking coronavirus package stalemate MORE (Ohio). 

Graham tweeted early Thursday evening that Portman and Sullivan had signed on as co-sponsors, while Alexander, Isakson, Gardner and Enzi were in the list of co-sponsors released by Graham on Friday.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump signs executive orders after coronavirus relief talks falter Coronavirus deal key to Republicans protecting Senate majority Coronavirus talks collapse as negotiators fail to reach deal MORE (R-Ky.), who supports the resolution, has not said if it will come up for a vote. If it did, it would currently fail to overcome a procedural hurdle that requires legislation get 60 votes in order to advance on the Senate floor. 

Republicans have fumed over the House impeachment inquiry, which has held near-daily closed-door depositions with current and former administration officials

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi, Schumer slam Trump executive orders, call for GOP to come back to negotiating table Trump signs executive orders after coronavirus relief talks falter Sunday shows preview: White House, congressional Democrats unable to breach stalemate over coronavirus relief MORE (D-Calif.) has said a formal vote for the inquiry isn't required. Republicans, however, want a vote because it would put swing-district Democrats on the record and give them more leverage to call their own witnesses. 

Neither Collins, who is up for reelection next year, nor Murkowski nor Romney has backed the House impeachment inquiry or removing Trump from office. 

But they've each refrained from taking a position, or chided colleagues who have already made a decision on impeachment. 

"I'll keep an open mind until and unless there is some kind of decision reached by the House. ... It's a purposeful effort on my part to stay unbiased, and to see the evidence as it's brought forward," Romney told reporters in Utah earlier this month.

Murkowski, speaking during a recent health care event in Alaska, said it was “troubling ... that even before there has been any considered review, that people have decided.” Meanwhile, Collins said it was "entirely inappropriate" for colleagues to have already "made up their minds." 

—Updated at 4:29 p.m.