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Romney, Collins, Murkowski only Senate GOP holdouts on Graham's impeachment resolution

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamFeinstein to step down as top Democrat on Judiciary Committee Democrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus Media and Hollywood should stop their marching-to-Georgia talk MORE (R-S.C.) said on Friday that all but three GOP senators had signed onto his resolution condemning the House impeachment inquiry. 

GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsWhoopi Goldberg blasts Republicans not speaking against Trump: 'This is an attempted coup' Democrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus Team Trump offering 'fire hose' of conspiracy Kool-Aid for supporters MORE (Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiWhoopi Goldberg blasts Republicans not speaking against Trump: 'This is an attempted coup' The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Calls mount to start transition as Biden readies Cabinet picks Murkowski calls on Trump to begin transition process, decries 'pressure campaign on state legislators' MORE (Alaska) and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyWhoopi Goldberg blasts Republicans not speaking against Trump: 'This is an attempted coup' GSA offers to brief Congress next week on presidential transition Democrats brush off calls for Biden to play hardball on Cabinet picks MORE (Utah) have not yet signed onto the resolution, according to an updated list of co-sponsors shared by Graham the day after he introduced the measure. 

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A spokesperson for Collins didn't immediately respond to a request for comment about whether or not she would back the resolution.

A spokeswoman for Romney noted that he said on Thursday that he would look at the resolution. 

"I’d like to see a vote taken in the House to decide whether there is support for impeachment. I’d love to see a more open process," Romney said. 

Murkowski also told reporters on Thursday that she hadn't yet read the resolution, which formally opposes the impeachment inquiry and urges House Democrats to hold an official vote on it. 

The resolution also says the House should give President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden team wants to understand Trump effort to 'hollow out government agencies' Trump's remaking of the judicial system Overnight Defense: Trump transgender ban 'inflicts concrete harms,' study says | China objects to US admiral's Taiwan visit MORE "due process" including "the ability to confront his accusers" and that House Republicans should be able to subpoena their own witnesses. 

When Graham introduced the resolution, he had 39 co-sponsors, but that quickly ticked up to 44, with only nine Republicans not signed on as of Thursday afternoon: Romney, Collins, Murkowski and Sens. Cory GardnerCory GardnerHillicon Valley: Trump fires top federal cybersecurity official, GOP senators push back | Apple to pay 3 million to resolve fight over batteries | Los Angeles Police ban use of third-party facial recognition software Senate passes bill to secure internet-connected devices against cyber vulnerabilities Democrats vent to Schumer over Senate majority failure MORE (Colo.), Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderTrump tells GSA that Biden transition can begin Democrats gear up for last oversight showdown with Trump Trump nominee's long road to Fed may be dead end MORE (Tenn.), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziRepublican Cynthia Lummis wins Wyoming Senate election Bottom line Chamber of Commerce endorses McSally for reelection MORE (Wyo.), Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanTrump administration proposal takes aim at bank pledges to avoid fossil fuel financing McSally, staff asked to break up maskless photo op inside Capitol Capitol's COVID-19 spike could be bad Thanksgiving preview MORE (Alaska), Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonOutside groups flood Georgia with advertising buys ahead of runoffs Georgia's Perdue-Ossoff runoff a legacy of the Solid South Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future MORE (Ga.) and Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGOP senator: No indication of widespread voting irregularities, window for Trump challenges is 'closing' Democrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus Biden moves forward as GOP breaks with Trump rise MORE (Ohio). 

Graham tweeted early Thursday evening that Portman and Sullivan had signed on as co-sponsors, while Alexander, Isakson, Gardner and Enzi were in the list of co-sponsors released by Graham on Friday.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFeinstein to step down as top Democrat on Judiciary Committee Voters want a strong economy and leadership, Democrats should listen On The Money: Biden to nominate Yellen for Treasury secretary | 'COVID cliff' looms | Democrats face pressure to back smaller stimulus MORE (R-Ky.), who supports the resolution, has not said if it will come up for a vote. If it did, it would currently fail to overcome a procedural hurdle that requires legislation get 60 votes in order to advance on the Senate floor. 

Republicans have fumed over the House impeachment inquiry, which has held near-daily closed-door depositions with current and former administration officials

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiVoters want a strong economy and leadership, Democrats should listen On The Money: Biden to nominate Yellen for Treasury secretary | 'COVID cliff' looms | Democrats face pressure to back smaller stimulus Democrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus MORE (D-Calif.) has said a formal vote for the inquiry isn't required. Republicans, however, want a vote because it would put swing-district Democrats on the record and give them more leverage to call their own witnesses. 

Neither Collins, who is up for reelection next year, nor Murkowski nor Romney has backed the House impeachment inquiry or removing Trump from office. 

But they've each refrained from taking a position, or chided colleagues who have already made a decision on impeachment. 

"I'll keep an open mind until and unless there is some kind of decision reached by the House. ... It's a purposeful effort on my part to stay unbiased, and to see the evidence as it's brought forward," Romney told reporters in Utah earlier this month.

Murkowski, speaking during a recent health care event in Alaska, said it was “troubling ... that even before there has been any considered review, that people have decided.” Meanwhile, Collins said it was "entirely inappropriate" for colleagues to have already "made up their minds." 

—Updated at 4:29 p.m.