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Romney, Collins, Murkowski only Senate GOP holdouts on Graham's impeachment resolution

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamPortman on Trump's dominance of GOP: Republican Party's policies are 'even more popular' Overnight Defense: Biden sends message with Syria airstrike | US intel points to Saudi crown prince in Khashoggi killing | Pentagon launches civilian-led sexual assault commission Graham: Trump will 'be helpful' to all Senate GOP incumbents MORE (R-S.C.) said on Friday that all but three GOP senators had signed onto his resolution condemning the House impeachment inquiry. 

GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate mulls changes to .9 trillion coronavirus bill Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote Collins urges Biden to revisit order on US-Canada border limits MORE (Maine), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiNew super PAC aims to support lawmakers who voted to impeach or convict Trump Kinzinger: GOP 'certainly not united' on 'vision for the future' Graham: Trump will 'be helpful' to all Senate GOP incumbents MORE (Alaska) and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyEx-Trump aide Pierson planning run for Congress Five takeaways from CPAC 2021 Trump shows he holds stranglehold on GOP, media in CPAC barnburner MORE (Utah) have not yet signed onto the resolution, according to an updated list of co-sponsors shared by Graham the day after he introduced the measure. 

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A spokesperson for Collins didn't immediately respond to a request for comment about whether or not she would back the resolution.

A spokeswoman for Romney noted that he said on Thursday that he would look at the resolution. 

"I’d like to see a vote taken in the House to decide whether there is support for impeachment. I’d love to see a more open process," Romney said. 

Murkowski also told reporters on Thursday that she hadn't yet read the resolution, which formally opposes the impeachment inquiry and urges House Democrats to hold an official vote on it. 

The resolution also says the House should give President TrumpDonald TrumpSacha Baron Cohen calls out 'danger of lies, hate and conspiracies' in Golden Globes speech Sorkin uses Abbie Hoffman quote to condemn Capitol violence: Democracy is 'something you do' Ex-Trump aide Pierson planning run for Congress MORE "due process" including "the ability to confront his accusers" and that House Republicans should be able to subpoena their own witnesses. 

When Graham introduced the resolution, he had 39 co-sponsors, but that quickly ticked up to 44, with only nine Republicans not signed on as of Thursday afternoon: Romney, Collins, Murkowski and Sens. Cory GardnerCory GardnerBiden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court rules against fast-track of Trump EPA's 'secret science' rule | Bureau of Land Management exodus: Agency lost 87 percent of staff in Trump HQ relocation | GM commits to electric light duty fleet by 2035 MORE (Colo.), Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderCongress addressed surprise medical bills, but the issue is not resolved Trump renominates Judy Shelton in last-ditch bid to reshape Fed Senate swears-in six new lawmakers as 117th Congress convenes MORE (Tenn.), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziLummis adopts 'laser eyes' meme touting Bitcoin Senate swears-in six new lawmakers as 117th Congress convenes With Senate at stake, Georgia is on all our minds MORE (Wyo.), Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Finger-pointing on Capitol riot; GOP balks at Biden relief plan Sanders votes against Biden USDA nominee Vilsack Senate confirms Vilsack as Agriculture secretary MORE (Alaska), Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonLoeffler leaves door open to 2022 rematch against Warnock Perdue on potential 2022 run: GOP must regain the Senate Bottom line MORE (Ga.) and Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSunday shows - Trump's reemergence, COVID-19 vaccines and variants dominate Portman on Trump's dominance of GOP: Republican Party's policies are 'even more popular' Sunday shows preview: 2024 hopefuls gather at CPAC; House passes coronavirus relief; vaccine effort continues MORE (Ohio). 

Graham tweeted early Thursday evening that Portman and Sullivan had signed on as co-sponsors, while Alexander, Isakson, Gardner and Enzi were in the list of co-sponsors released by Graham on Friday.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump shows he holds stranglehold on GOP, media in CPAC barnburner Trump rules out starting a new party: 'Fake news' Sunday shows - Trump's reemergence, COVID-19 vaccines and variants dominate MORE (R-Ky.), who supports the resolution, has not said if it will come up for a vote. If it did, it would currently fail to overcome a procedural hurdle that requires legislation get 60 votes in order to advance on the Senate floor. 

Republicans have fumed over the House impeachment inquiry, which has held near-daily closed-door depositions with current and former administration officials

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump shows he holds stranglehold on GOP, media in CPAC barnburner Biden brings back bipartisan meetings at the White House McCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP takes back lower chamber in 2022 MORE (D-Calif.) has said a formal vote for the inquiry isn't required. Republicans, however, want a vote because it would put swing-district Democrats on the record and give them more leverage to call their own witnesses. 

Neither Collins, who is up for reelection next year, nor Murkowski nor Romney has backed the House impeachment inquiry or removing Trump from office. 

But they've each refrained from taking a position, or chided colleagues who have already made a decision on impeachment. 

"I'll keep an open mind until and unless there is some kind of decision reached by the House. ... It's a purposeful effort on my part to stay unbiased, and to see the evidence as it's brought forward," Romney told reporters in Utah earlier this month.

Murkowski, speaking during a recent health care event in Alaska, said it was “troubling ... that even before there has been any considered review, that people have decided.” Meanwhile, Collins said it was "entirely inappropriate" for colleagues to have already "made up their minds." 

—Updated at 4:29 p.m.