Grassley: Up to whistleblower to reveal identity

Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Health Care: Nevada union won't endorse before caucuses after 'Medicare for All' scrap | McConnell tees up votes on two abortion bills | CDC confirms 15th US coronavirus case Mnuchin defends Treasury regulations on GOP tax law Wyden, Mnuchin clash over Trump tax returns, Hunter Biden probe MORE (R-Iowa) said Monday that it is up to the whistleblower at the center of the impeachment inquiry to decide whether or not to come forward after President TrumpDonald John TrumpRussian sanctions will boomerang States, cities rethink tax incentives after Amazon HQ2 backlash A Presidents Day perspective on the nature of a free press MORE urged the media to reveal the individual's identity.

"That's strictly up to the whistleblower," Grassley told reporters.

When asked if Trump's remarks on Sunday were appropriate, the Iowa Republican demurred.

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"All I want to do is make sure the law is followed," he said. "A person like me that has advocated for whistleblowers for a long period of time, including this whistleblower, I want maximum protection for whistleblowers."

Trump and some of his GOP allies on Capitol Hill have been publicly calling for the whistleblower to be unmasked, arguing that the president should be able to confront the individual, whose complaint helped spur the House inquiry.

Trump told reporters on Sunday that they "would be doing the public a service" if they disclosed the individual's identity.

"They know who it is. You know who it is. You just don't want to report it. CNN knows who it is, but you don't want to report it," Trump said. "You know, you’d be doing the public a service if you did."

Grassley has repeatedly defended the whistleblower, and said last month that the individual deserved to be "heard out and protected."

Lawyers for the whistleblower have said that the individual would be willing to answer questions from both the House and Senate Intelligence Committee in writing and under oath.

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSenate braces for fight over impeachment whistleblower testimony US defense chief says Taliban deal 'looks very promising' but not without risk Lawmakers wary as US on cusp of initial deal with Taliban MORE (R-S.C.), an ally of the president's who is a member of neither committee, said on Monday that Trump "must have full right of confrontation regarding the whistleblower." Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrSenate braces for fight over impeachment whistleblower testimony US prosecutors bring new charges against China's Huawei Graham vows to approach Hunter Biden probe with caution: 'I'm not going to be the Republican Christopher Steele' MORE (R-N.C.) also told The Hill late last week that the offer, which was also outlined in The Washington Post last month, was "not acceptable."

House Democrats in September launched an impeachment inquiry amid reports that Trump pressured the president of Ukraine to investigate 2020 Democratic presidential front-runner Joe BidenJoe BidenJoe Biden lost his fastball — can he get it back before South Carolina? Where the 2020 Democrats stand on taxes Bloomberg hits Sanders supporters in new ad MORE and his son. No evidence of criminal wrongdoing by the Bidens has emerged. 

Trump has repeatedly said he did nothing wrong.