Grassley: Up to whistleblower to reveal identity

Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyGraham emerges as go-to ally for Biden's judicial picks Iowa Democrat drops bid to challenge Grassley after death of nephew Bipartisan senators press FBI, inspector general for changes following Nassar case MORE (R-Iowa) said Monday that it is up to the whistleblower at the center of the impeachment inquiry to decide whether or not to come forward after President TrumpDonald TrumpMedia giants side with Bannon on request to release Jan. 6 documents Cheney warns of consequences for Trump in dealings with Jan. 6 committee Jan. 6 panel recommends contempt charges for Trump DOJ official MORE urged the media to reveal the individual's identity.

"That's strictly up to the whistleblower," Grassley told reporters.

When asked if Trump's remarks on Sunday were appropriate, the Iowa Republican demurred.

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"All I want to do is make sure the law is followed," he said. "A person like me that has advocated for whistleblowers for a long period of time, including this whistleblower, I want maximum protection for whistleblowers."

Trump and some of his GOP allies on Capitol Hill have been publicly calling for the whistleblower to be unmasked, arguing that the president should be able to confront the individual, whose complaint helped spur the House inquiry.

Trump told reporters on Sunday that they "would be doing the public a service" if they disclosed the individual's identity.

"They know who it is. You know who it is. You just don't want to report it. CNN knows who it is, but you don't want to report it," Trump said. "You know, you’d be doing the public a service if you did."

Grassley has repeatedly defended the whistleblower, and said last month that the individual deserved to be "heard out and protected."

Lawyers for the whistleblower have said that the individual would be willing to answer questions from both the House and Senate Intelligence Committee in writing and under oath.

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham emerges as go-to ally for Biden's judicial picks This Thanksgiving, skip the political food fights and talk UFOs instead Biden move to tap oil reserves draws GOP pushback MORE (R-S.C.), an ally of the president's who is a member of neither committee, said on Monday that Trump "must have full right of confrontation regarding the whistleblower." Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrTexas Democrat Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson announces retirement at end of term On The Money — IRS chief calls for reinforcements Burr brother-in-law ordered to testify in insider trading probe MORE (R-N.C.) also told The Hill late last week that the offer, which was also outlined in The Washington Post last month, was "not acceptable."

House Democrats in September launched an impeachment inquiry amid reports that Trump pressured the president of Ukraine to investigate 2020 Democratic presidential front-runner Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden and Harris host 'family' Hanukkah celebration with more than 150 guests Symone Sanders to leave the White House at the end of the year Overnight Defense & National Security — Senate looks to break defense bill stalemate MORE and his son. No evidence of criminal wrongdoing by the Bidens has emerged. 

Trump has repeatedly said he did nothing wrong.