Jury convicts woman of mailing white powder to Sen. Susan Collins

Jury convicts woman of mailing white powder to Sen. Susan Collins
© Greg Nash

A federal jury on Monday reportedly convicted a woman after she sent a letter containing white powder to the home of Maine Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGiffords, Demand Justice to pressure GOP senators to reject Trump judicial pick Senate confirms eight Trump court picks in three days Lawmakers call for investigation into program meant to help student loan borrowers with disabilities MORE (R). 

The jury found Maine resident Suzanne Muscara guilty of mailing a threatening communication, according to reports. Muscara will be sentenced at a later date. 

Muscara reportedly sent a flyer from insurance company Aetna with a handwritten note that said, “Anthrax!!! HA HA HA," according to the Portland Press Herald.

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It also featured a drawing of a stick figure with the letter "X" written on its eyes. An arrow next to the figure included the message, "you," according to the publication. 

The letter had been mailed to Collins just two days after the senator's husband, Thomas Daffron, opened a letter that claimed to contain "ricin residue." The incident led postal screeners to inspect letters headed for Collins's residence. The letter was intercepted on Oct. 17 before reaching her home. 

Muscara admitted to sending the letter to Collins after being identified from fingerprints. However she pushed back against its seriousness, telling investigators that it wasn't intended to be threatening and was meant as a joke.

“It wasn’t a threat, I just thought the note itself was funny,” Muscara said in an interview with the FBI, according to The Press Herald. She also reportedly claimed that the white powder was baking soda. 

United States Postal Inspector Troy Dumond testified in court on Monday that “a chunk of white powder fell on the floor” when he was inspecting mail sent to Collins's home. 

“Senator Collins and her husband, Tom Daffron, are grateful for the extraordinary professionalism and effective investigative work by state and federal law enforcement agencies," Annie Clark, Collins’s communications director, said in a statement to The Hill.