Democrats give Warren's 'Medicare for All' plan the cold shoulder

Senate Democrats are distancing themselves from Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenBiden's fiscal program: What is the likely market impact? Warren, Schumer introduce plan for next president to cancel ,000 in student debt The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Don't expect a government check anytime soon MORE’s (D-Mass.) “Medicare for All” plan, casting doubt on whether it could pass even if she does win the presidency.

Warren rolled out her proposal for Medicare for All last week, instantly fanning the flames of a raging debate among the Democratic presidential contenders over the idea.

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But even if Warren wins the presidency and Democrats take back the Senate next year, her proposal would still face long odds of actually being enacted given objections among many senators of her own party.

Some Democratic senators on Tuesday said flatly that they would not vote for Warren’s plan if she were president in 2021. 

“No, I wouldn’t; I’ve said consistently that I am not for Medicare for All,” said Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.), who faces a tough reelection race next year. A victory by Jones would greatly help Democrats reach a Senate majority.

Sen. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezKasie Hunt to host lead-in show for MSNBC's 'Morning Joe' Senators ask for removal of tariffs on EU food, wine, spirits: report VOA visa decision could hobble Venezuela coverage MORE (D-N.J.) said “not as I understand it” when asked if he would vote for Warren’s plan.

The proposed elimination of private insurance and its trillions of dollars in tax hikes are prime reasons Democrats cite for rejecting her approach.

Many Democratic senators said they prefer an optional government-run insurance plan, known as a public option, more along the lines of what former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenMomentum growing among Republicans for Supreme Court vote before Election Day Trump expects to nominate woman to replace Ginsburg next week Video of Lindsey Graham arguing against nominating a Supreme Court justice in an election year goes viral MORE and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBipartisan praise pours in after Ginsburg's death Bogeymen of the far left deserve a place in any Biden administration Overnight Defense: Woodward book causes new firestorm | Book says Trump lashed out at generals, told Woodward about secret weapons system | US withdrawing thousands of troops from Iraq MORE are proposing.

“I’m not about to take away private insurance from the union members who have worked so hard to negotiate for it,” Menendez said.

The Medicare for All legislation sponsored by Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersNYT editorial board remembers Ginsburg: She 'will forever have two legacies' Two GOP governors urge Republicans to hold off on Supreme Court nominee Sanders knocks McConnell: He's going against Ginsburg's 'dying wishes' MORE (I-Vt.), a progressive rival to Warren for the Democratic presidential nomination, has support from some Democratic senators, but most are not backing it. The bill has 14 Democratic co-sponsors in addition to Sanders, out of 47 members of the Senate Democratic Conference.

Democrats must win a net gain of three seats and take the White House to gain the Senate majority in 2021, a high bar. If they do, they are expected to have a narrow majority, where only a few Senate Democrats would be enough to kill ambitious liberal proposals even if the party abolished the filibuster to allow measures to pass without Republican support.

And it is not just a handful of moderates who have concerns with Medicare for All, but many mainstream Senate Democrats. 

Asked if he would vote for Warren’s plan in 2021, Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinPPP application window closes after coronavirus talks deadlock  Congress eyes tighter restrictions on next round of small business help Senate passes extension of application deadline for PPP small-business loans MORE (D-Md.) doubted it would come up for a vote at all.

“I don’t know that we’ll have a chance to do that; I think we’ll take up our own proposals,” he said. “I’m for universal coverage, I’m for building on the Affordable Care Act. My preference is to move forward on a public option.”

If Democrats controlled the Senate, he added, “I think we would look to build on the Affordable Care Act,” rather than pass Medicare for All.

Warren, a top-tier candidate now seen as a favorite to win the Iowa caucuses, sought to address concerns about Medicare for All on Friday by emphasizing that her $20.5 trillion plan would not include any middle-class tax increases. She said it would instead be funded by redirecting what employers already pay for health insurance and new taxes on the wealthy.  

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Warren and Sanders also emphasize that Medicare for All would expand coverage to everyone and would eliminate premiums and deductibles, providing much more generous coverage to the millions of people who struggle with high out-of-pocket costs under the current system.

Asked by a reporter in Iowa on Monday how she would get Medicare for All through the Senate, Warren said the election results would send a message.

“When I win, I will turn around to all of my Democratic colleagues and say this is what I ran on,” Warren said, according to a transcript provided by her campaign. “It’s there. And that’s what the majority of the people in the United States said they wanted.”

She acknowledged that “there have to be compromises” in Congress. “But we’ve gotta come together after this primary, we’ve gotta come together for the 2020 election,” she added. “And then, we have to deliver what we run on.”

Some Democrats fear that Medicare for All is a liability in the general election. An optional government-run plan polled better than full-scale Medicare for All in a September Kaiser Family Foundation survey, which found 69 percent support for an optional plan and 52 percent support for the full-scale government plan.

“I line up with Joe Biden. I want to make sure that the Affordable Care Act works,” said Sen. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperDemocrat asks for probe of EPA's use of politically appointed lawyers Overnight Energy: Study links coronavirus mortality to air pollution exposure | Low-income, minority households pay more for utilities: report OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Democrats push resolution to battle climate change, sluggish economy and racial injustice | Senators reach compromise on greenhouse gas amendment stalling energy bill | Trump courts Florida voters with offshore drilling moratorium MORE (D-Del.), who has endorsed Biden. “I supported a public option. I still do.”

Carper and Cardin both declined to say definitively if they would vote “no” on full-scale Medicare for All legislation if it came to a vote.

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerIntelligence chief says Congress will get some in-person election security briefings Overnight Defense: Trump hosts Israel, UAE, Bahrain for historic signing l Air Force reveals it secretly built and flew new fighter jet l Coronavirus creates delay in Pentagon research for alternative to 'forever chemicals' House approves bill to secure internet-connected federal devices against cyber threats MORE (D-Va.) objected to Medicare for All’s elimination of private insurance, saying there need to be “reforms to the private health care marketplace” but that “elimination of that option” is the wrong approach. 

Medicare for All has more support in the House, where about half of the Democratic caucus has signed on to the leading bill.

But the top House Democrat, Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSunday shows preview: Justice Ginsburg dies, sparking partisan battle over vacancy before election Trump is betting big on the suburbs, but his strategy is failing 'bigly' Trump orders flags at half-staff to honor 'trailblazer' Ginsburg MORE (Calif.), raised concerns with the idea last week, telling Bloomberg, “I’m not a big fan of Medicare for All.”

Some Democrats think it is smarter for the party to focus on the winning message that helped the party gain back the House last year and highlight Republican efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act. President TrumpDonald John TrumpUS reimposes UN sanctions on Iran amid increasing tensions Jeff Flake: Republicans 'should hold the same position' on SCOTUS vacancy as 2016 Trump supporters chant 'Fill that seat' at North Carolina rally MORE is supporting a lawsuit to overturn the entire law that is currently making its way through the courts. 

“There are differences on the Democratic side about how fast to get to universal coverage, but Trump wants to take people’s health insurance away,” said Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownBipartisan praise pours in after Ginsburg's death Emboldened Democrats haggle over 2021 agenda Hillicon Valley: Russia 'amplifying' concerns around mail-in voting to undermine election | Facebook and Twitter take steps to limit Trump remarks on voting | Facebook to block political ads ahead of election MORE (D-Ohio).

Cardin noted that a Democratic president would certainly have some sway on which way the party goes on health care, but that the ultimate decision would be up to Congress.

“That’s what’s great about the American system, the independent branches of government,” he said.