Senate Intel chair doesn't want whistleblower's identity disclosed

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy North Carolina poised to pass new congressional maps Saagar Enjeti claims Pelosi's impeachment strategy could hurt 2020 Democrats MORE (R-N.C.) said on Thursday that he does not think the identity of the whistleblower at the center of the House impeachment inquiry should be publicly disclosed. 
 
Asked by reporters if he wanted the individual's identity to be made public, Burr told reporters that he "never" thought that. 
 
"We protect whistleblowers. We protect witnesses in our committee," Burr added.
 
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"[But] I think we should allow the president to know who the accuser is. And I think the whistleblower statute is being terribly abused here," Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamHillicon Valley: Commerce extends Huawei waiver | Senate Dems unveil privacy bill priorities | House funding measure extends surveillance program | Trump to tour Apple factory | GOP bill would restrict US data going to China Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Stopgap spending bill includes military pay raise | Schumer presses Pentagon to protect impeachment witnesses | US ends civil-nuclear waiver in Iran Cruz, Graham and Cheney call on Trump to end all nuclear waivers for Iran MORE (R-S.C.), the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, told reporters earlier this week.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard Paul Democratic debate at Tyler Perry's could miss the mark with black voters RNC says ex-Trump ambassador nominee's efforts 'to link future contributions to an official action' were 'inappropriate' GOP divided over impeachment trial strategy MORE (R-Ky.) also called for the media to publicly out the whistleblower during a rally with Trump in Kentucky — to the consternation of many of his colleagues — telling reporters: "Do your job and print his name." 
 
Burr's committee is reviewing the process behind the whistleblower complaint, the handling of which created a high-profile split within the administration. 
 
The complaint — tied to Trump asking Ukraine to open a probe into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenMost Americans break with Trump on Ukraine, but just 45 percent think he should be removed: poll Democrats release two new transcripts ahead of next public impeachment hearings Press: Ukraine's not the only outrage MORE and his son Hunter Biden — is also at the center of the House impeachment inquiry, which is looking into whether or not Trump conditioned aid to the country on it agreeing to open up an investigation. 
 
Burr, however, does want to speak with the whistleblower as part of his committee's investigation into the process. 
 
Lawyers for the whistleblower have offered to have the individual provide written answers to questions under oath. But Burr told The Hill late last week that the setup was "not acceptable."
 
“We have a proven track record of protecting people's identity,” Burr added at the time. 

He added on Thursday that he believed the whistleblower's attorneys had done a "reversal" since they made initial contact about making the individual available. 

"I just think that they were disingenuous when they ... sent us a letter saying how anxious they were to come before the committee," he added.