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Senate Intel chair doesn't want whistleblower's identity disclosed

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrRick Scott caught in middle of opposing GOP factions Bipartisan bill would ban lawmakers from buying, selling stocks Republicans, please save your party MORE (R-N.C.) said on Thursday that he does not think the identity of the whistleblower at the center of the House impeachment inquiry should be publicly disclosed. 
 
Asked by reporters if he wanted the individual's identity to be made public, Burr told reporters that he "never" thought that. 
 
"We protect whistleblowers. We protect witnesses in our committee," Burr added.
 
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His comments come as President TrumpDonald TrumpUS, South Korea reach agreement on cost-sharing for troops Graham: Trump can make GOP bigger, stronger, or he 'could destroy it' Biden nominates female generals whose promotions were reportedly delayed under Trump MORE and some of his allies on Capitol Hill have called for the whistleblower to come forward and for the individual's name to be publicly released.  
 
"[But] I think we should allow the president to know who the accuser is. And I think the whistleblower statute is being terribly abused here," Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham: Trump can make GOP bigger, stronger, or he 'could destroy it' Sunday shows preview: Manchin makes the rounds after pivotal role in coronavirus relief debate Georgia DA investigating Trump taps racketeering expert for probe: report MORE (R-S.C.), the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, told reporters earlier this week.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulWhite House open to reforming war powers amid bipartisan push House approves George Floyd Justice in Policing Act Bipartisan group of senators introduces bill to rein in Biden's war powers MORE (R-Ky.) also called for the media to publicly out the whistleblower during a rally with Trump in Kentucky — to the consternation of many of his colleagues — telling reporters: "Do your job and print his name." 
 
Burr's committee is reviewing the process behind the whistleblower complaint, the handling of which created a high-profile split within the administration. 
 
The complaint — tied to Trump asking Ukraine to open a probe into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenLawmakers, activists remember civil rights icons to mark 'Bloody Sunday' Fauci predicts high schoolers will receive coronavirus vaccinations this fall Biden nominates female generals whose promotions were reportedly delayed under Trump MORE and his son Hunter Biden — is also at the center of the House impeachment inquiry, which is looking into whether or not Trump conditioned aid to the country on it agreeing to open up an investigation. 
 
Burr, however, does want to speak with the whistleblower as part of his committee's investigation into the process. 
 
Lawyers for the whistleblower have offered to have the individual provide written answers to questions under oath. But Burr told The Hill late last week that the setup was "not acceptable."
 
“We have a proven track record of protecting people's identity,” Burr added at the time. 

He added on Thursday that he believed the whistleblower's attorneys had done a "reversal" since they made initial contact about making the individual available. 

"I just think that they were disingenuous when they ... sent us a letter saying how anxious they were to come before the committee," he added.