GOP chairman says Senate impeachment trial could last 6-8 weeks

Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrHillicon Valley: Apple, Barr clash over Pensacola shooter's phone | Senate bill would boost Huawei alternatives | DHS orders agencies to fix Microsoft vulnerability | Chrome to phase out tracking cookies Senators offer bill to create alternatives to Huawei in 5G tech Voting machine vendors to testify on election security MORE (R-N.C.) predicted the Senate’s handling of potential articles of impeachment could take up to two months.

“We basically hear the case, and then we have to come to a verdict. That will probably be a six- or eight- weeks process,” Burr said at an event at Wake Forest University with Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerHillicon Valley: Apple, Barr clash over Pensacola shooter's phone | Senate bill would boost Huawei alternatives | DHS orders agencies to fix Microsoft vulnerability | Chrome to phase out tracking cookies Senators offer bill to create alternatives to Huawei in 5G tech Sen. Warner calls on State Department to take measures to protect against cyberattacks MORE (D-Va.).  

ADVERTISEMENT

Burr’s comments come as the House is set to enter the public phase of its impeachment inquiry into whether President TrumpDonald John TrumpNational Archives says it altered Trump signs, other messages in Women's March photo Dems plan marathon prep for Senate trial, wary of Trump trying to 'game' the process Democratic lawmaker dismisses GOP lawsuit threat: 'Take your letter and shove it' MORE tied aid to Ukraine to the country opening an investigation into Vice President Biden and his son Hunter Biden. 

An eight-week time frame would be longer than the Senate’s roughly five-week trial of former President Clinton. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDems plan marathon prep for Senate trial, wary of Trump trying to 'game' the process Senate GOP mulls speeding up Trump impeachment trial Republicans will pay on Election Day for politicizing Trump's impeachment MORE (R-Ky.) previously told GOP senators that one potential timeline would be for the House to vote on impeachment articles by Thanksgiving and for the Senate to wrap up its trial by the end of the year. 

Now, the House is aiming to hold an impeachment vote by Christmas, which would set up a Senate trial for next year.