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McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial'

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden backs 0B compromise coronavirus stimulus bill US records over 14 million coronavirus cases On The Money: COVID-19 relief picks up steam as McConnell, Pelosi hold talks | Slowing job growth raises fears of double-dip recession | Biden officially announces Brian Deese as top economic adviser MORE (R-Ky.) brushed aside a question on Wednesday about trying to quickly dismiss the articles of impeachment against President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden says GOP senators have called to congratulate him Biden: Trump attending inauguration is 'of consequence' to the country Biden says family will avoid business conflicts MORE, noting the chamber would have to have a trial.

"I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell told reporters.

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He added about the potential time frame for an impeachment trial, "on the issue of how long it goes on, it's really kind of up to the Senate. People will have to conclude are they learning something new? At some point we'll get to an end." 

McConnell's comments come as there's been chatter among some Senate Republicans that they should quickly try to dismiss any articles of impeachment that are sent over from the House. 

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulOvernight Defense: Lawmakers release compromise defense bill in defiance of Trump veto threat | Senate voting next week on blocking UAE arms sale | Report faults lack of training, 'chronic fatigue' in military plane crashes Senate to vote next week on blocking Trump's UAE arms sale McConnell in tough position as House eyes earmark return MORE (R-Ky.), a close ally of Trump's, also told reporters recently that he wanted to be able to quickly to dismiss any articles of impeachment. 

But members of leadership, as well as rank-and-file senators, have said they expect to go through a trial. 

Democrats tried, but failed, to dismiss the articles of impeachment against then-President Clinton. 

A motion to dismiss would need a simple majority of 51 votes.  

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Capital One — Pressure builds as UK approves COVID-19 vaccine Biden brushes off criticism of budget nominee Republican frustration builds over Cabinet picks MORE (R-Texas) told reporters on Wednesday that he did not expect there would be enough support to quickly dismiss any articles of impeachment and avoid a trial. 

“There’s some people talking about trying to stop the bill, dismiss charges basically as soon as they get over here. I think that’s not going to happen. That would require 51 votes,” he said.