McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial'

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDems plan marathon prep for Senate trial, wary of Trump trying to 'game' the process Senate GOP mulls speeding up Trump impeachment trial Republicans will pay on Election Day for politicizing Trump's impeachment MORE (R-Ky.) brushed aside a question on Wednesday about trying to quickly dismiss the articles of impeachment against President TrumpDonald John TrumpNational Archives says it altered Trump signs, other messages in Women's March photo Dems plan marathon prep for Senate trial, wary of Trump trying to 'game' the process Democratic lawmaker dismisses GOP lawsuit threat: 'Take your letter and shove it' MORE, noting the chamber would have to have a trial.

"I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell told reporters.

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He added about the potential time frame for an impeachment trial, "on the issue of how long it goes on, it's really kind of up to the Senate. People will have to conclude are they learning something new? At some point we'll get to an end." 

McConnell's comments come as there's been chatter among some Senate Republicans that they should quickly try to dismiss any articles of impeachment that are sent over from the House. 

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP threatens to weaponize impeachment witnesses amid standoff Paul predicts no Republicans will vote to convict Trump Graham on impeachment trial: 'End this crap as quickly as possible' MORE (R-Ky.), a close ally of Trump's, also told reporters recently that he wanted to be able to quickly to dismiss any articles of impeachment. 

But members of leadership, as well as rank-and-file senators, have said they expect to go through a trial. 

Democrats tried, but failed, to dismiss the articles of impeachment against then-President Clinton. 

A motion to dismiss would need a simple majority of 51 votes.  

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynHillicon Valley: Biden calls for revoking tech legal shield | DHS chief 'fully expects' Russia to try to interfere in 2020 | Smaller companies testify against Big Tech 'monopoly power' Bipartisan group of senators introduces legislation to boost state cybersecurity leadership Koch network could target almost 200 races in 2020, official says MORE (R-Texas) told reporters on Wednesday that he did not expect there would be enough support to quickly dismiss any articles of impeachment and avoid a trial. 

“There’s some people talking about trying to stop the bill, dismiss charges basically as soon as they get over here. I think that’s not going to happen. That would require 51 votes,” he said.