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McConnell discounts quick dismissal of Trump impeachment articles: 'We'll have to have a trial'

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcCarthy and Biden haven't spoken since election Democrats roll out legislation to expand Supreme Court Wall Street spent .9B on campaigns, lobbying in 2020 election: study MORE (R-Ky.) brushed aside a question on Wednesday about trying to quickly dismiss the articles of impeachment against President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden administration still seizing land near border despite plans to stop building wall: report Illinois House passes bill that would mandate Asian-American history lessons in schools Overnight Defense: Administration says 'low to moderate confidence' Russia behind Afghanistan troop bounties | 'Low to medium risk' of Russia invading Ukraine in next few weeks | Intelligence leaders face sharp questions during House worldwide threats he MORE, noting the chamber would have to have a trial.

"I don't think there's any question that we have to take up the matter. The rules of impeachment are very clear, we'll have to have a trial. My own view is that we should give people the opportunity to put the case on," McConnell told reporters.

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He added about the potential time frame for an impeachment trial, "on the issue of how long it goes on, it's really kind of up to the Senate. People will have to conclude are they learning something new? At some point we'll get to an end." 

McConnell's comments come as there's been chatter among some Senate Republicans that they should quickly try to dismiss any articles of impeachment that are sent over from the House. 

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - CDC in limbo on J&J vax verdict; Rep. Brady retiring Anti-Asian hate crimes bill overcomes first Senate hurdle Fauci on Tucker Carlson vaccine comments: 'Typical crazy conspiracy theory' MORE (R-Ky.), a close ally of Trump's, also told reporters recently that he wanted to be able to quickly to dismiss any articles of impeachment. 

But members of leadership, as well as rank-and-file senators, have said they expect to go through a trial. 

Democrats tried, but failed, to dismiss the articles of impeachment against then-President Clinton. 

A motion to dismiss would need a simple majority of 51 votes.  

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynIntelligence leaders push for mandatory breach notification law Senate GOP signal they won't filibuster debate of hate crimes bill Application portal for venue grants down for five days with no updates MORE (R-Texas) told reporters on Wednesday that he did not expect there would be enough support to quickly dismiss any articles of impeachment and avoid a trial. 

“There’s some people talking about trying to stop the bill, dismiss charges basically as soon as they get over here. I think that’s not going to happen. That would require 51 votes,” he said.